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Full text of "University of New Haven Graduate School Catalog, 1997-99"

AC 30 



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1997/99 ^-1999 Graduate School Catalog 

arad /our UNH Education Equals Career Success 




University of NewHaven 



West Haven, CT 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/universityofne199799univ 



University of NewHaven 



GRADUATE 

SCHOOL 

CATALOG 

1997-99 



300 Orange Avenue 
West Haven, CT 06516 

Main Number: (203) 932-7000 

Graduate Admissions: (203) 932-7133 
or Toil-Free: 1-800-DIAL-UNH 
E-mail: gradinfo@charger.newhaven.edu 
FAX: (203) 932-7137 

Internet/URL Code: www.newhaven.edu 

Voice/TDD Number: (203) 932-7331 



This catalog supersedes all previous 
bulletins, catalogs and brochures published 
by the Graduate School and describes 
academic programs to be offered beginning 
in fall 1997. Graduate students admitted to 
the university for the fall of 1997 and 
thereafter are bound by the regulations 
published in this catalog. 

The University of New Haven is commit- 
ted to affirmative action and to a policy 
which provides for equal opportunity in 
employment, advancement, admission, 
educational opportunity and administration 
of financial aid to all persons on the basis of 
individual merit. This policy is adminis- 
tered without regard to race, color, national 
or ethnic origin, age, gender, religion, 
sexual orientation or disabilities not related 
to performance. It is the policy of the 
University of New Haven not to discrimi- 
nate on the basis of gender in its admission, 
educational programs, activities or employ- 
ment policies as required by Title IX of the 
1972 Educational Amendments. This school 
is authorized under federal law to enroll 
non-immigrant alien students. 

Inquiries regarding affirmative action, 
equal opportunity and Title IX may be 
directed to the university's equal opportu- 
nity/affirmative action officer. Persons who 
have special needs requiring accommoda- 
tion should notify the university's Disabili- 
ties Accommodation Services Office, by 
Voice/TDD number (203) 932-7331. 



Every effort has been made to ensure that 
the information contained in this publica- 
tion is accurate and current as of the date of 
publication; however, the university cannot 
be held responsible for typographical errors 
or omissions that may have occurred. 

Volume XX, No. 9, June 1997 

The University of New Haven is pub- 
lished nine times a year in February, April 
(2), May (2), June, July, and November (2) 
by the University of New Haven, 300 
Orange Avenue, West Haven, CT 06516. 
Second class postage paid at New Haven, 
CT, publication number USPS 423-410. 
Postmaster: please send form 3579 to Office 
of Public Relations, University of New 
Haven, PO. Box 9605, New Haven, CT 
06535-0605. 



The university reserves the right, at 
any time, to make whatever changes 
may be deemed necessary in admission 
requirements, fees, charges, tuition, 
policies, regulations and academic 
programs prior to the start of any class, 
term, semester, trimester or session. All 
such changes are effective at such times 
as the proper authorities determine and 
may apply not only to prospective 
students but also to those already 
enrolled in the university. 



Dear Graduate Student: 




This catalog is the formal document through which we at the University of New Haven 
present our graduate academic programs to you. A quick perusal of its various sections will 
introduce you to the breadth and diversity of our educational offerings. A more in-depth 
examination will, we beUeve, help you select the area or areas of interest which will best serve 
your personal, professional and educational needs. 

The university's Graduate School strives to maintain a balance between industry's needs 
and those of our students, who find themselves in an increasingly complex and global mar- 
ketplace. Founded in 1969, the Graduate School is currently one of the largest such schools in 
Connecticut and our master's and doctoral level graduates are well placed in industry and 
the public sector throughout the state and across the nation. 

As a graduate student at UNH, you will find a challenging educational environment and a 
highly qualified faculty, many of whom have professional experience in addition to excellent 
academic credentials. You will also find a wide range of support services; our classrooms, 
laboratories, library and other facilities are carefully designed and maintained to enhance the 
academic environment on campus. 

Flexible scheduling, which includes offering courses on a trimester basis, allows you to 
progress at your own pace and in conjunction with the time constraints of a working profes- 
sional. In addition, a wide range of social, cultural and intellectual activities is available to 
you to complement your academic pursuits. 

The University of New Haven and its Graduate School are focused on helping you meet 
the standards and goals that you have set for yourself. We welcome you to UNH and wish 
you the best in your educational endeavors here at our university. 



Sincerel 




President 



^IW^J. 



eNardis 



University of New Haven 
Graduate Degree Programs 



College of Arts & Sciences 

Cellular & Molecular Biology, M.S. 
Community Psychology, M.A. 
Education 

M.S., Teacher Certification 
M.S., Professional Education 
Sixth Year Diploma, School 
Administration 
Environmental Science, M.S. 
Human Nutrition, M.S. 
Industrial / Organizational 
Psychology, M.A. 

School of Business 

Sc.D., Management Systems 
M.B.A., Business Administration 
M.B.A., Executive Program 
M.P. A., Public Administration 
M.B.A./M.P.A., dual degree 
Accounting, M.S. 
Finance & Financial Services, M.S. 
Health Care Administration, M.S. 
Industrial Relations, M.S. 
Taxation, M.S. 

School of Engineering & Applied 
Science 

Computer & Information 

Science, M.S. 
Electrical Engineering, M.S. 
Environmental Engineering, M.S. 
Industrial Engineering, M.S.I.E. 
M.B.A./M.S.I.E., dual degree 
Mechanical Engineering, M.S.M.E. 
Operations Research, M.S. 



School of Hotel, Restaurant, Tourism & 
Dietetics Administration 

Hospitality & Tourism, M.S. 

School of Public Safety & Professional 
Studies 

Criminal Justice, M.S. 
Fire Science, M.S. 
Forensic Science, M.S. 
Industrial Hygiene, M.S. 
Occupational Safety & Health 
Management, M.S. 



Graduate Certificates 

College of Arts & Sciences 

Applications of Psychology 

Geographical Information Systems 

International Relations 

Legal Studies 

Mental Retardation Services 

School of Business 

Accounting (3 options) 

Business Management 

Finance 

Health Care Management 

Human Resources Management 

International Business 

Long-Term Health Care 

Marketing (2 options) 

Public Administration 

Public Management (2 options) 

Taxation (2 options) 

Technology Management 

Telecommunication Management 

School of Engineering & Applied Science 

Civil Engineering Design 
Computer and Information Science 
Logistics /Advanced Logistics 

School of Hotel, Restaurant, Tourism & Dietetics 

Hospitality and Tourism 

School of Public Safety & Professional Studies 
Arson Investigation 
Criminal Justice /Security 

Management 
Fire Science /Administration and 

Technology 
Forensic Science /Advanced 

Investigation 
Forensic Science /Criminalistics 
Forensic Science/Fire Science 
Industrial Hygiene 
Occupational Safety 
Public Safety Management 



CALENDAR 

1997-99 



Summer Term 1997 Wednesday, July 9 - Thursday, Aug. 21 



Fall Term 1997 



Winter Term 1998 



Spring Term 1998 



Monday, Sept. 8 - Saturday, Dec. 13 

Last day to petition for January graduation Wednesday, Oct. 15 



Thanksgiving recess, no classes 

Monday, Jan. 5 - Saturday, April 4 

Commencement 

Last day to petition for May graduation 

Monday, April 6 - Saturday, July 4 

Good Friday, no classes — 
a make-up class will be scheduled 

Commencement 

Memorial Day, no classes — 
a make-up class will be scheduled 

Last day to petition for awarding of 
degrees in August 



Monday, Nov. 24 - 
Saturday, Nov. 29 

Saturday, Jan. 17 
Monday, March 2 



Friday, April 10 
Saturday, May 23 

Monday, May 25 

Monday, June 15 



Summer Term 1998 Wednesday, July 8 - Thursday, Aug. 20 



Calendar continued on next page 



Fall Term 1998 



Monday, Sept. 14 - Saturday, Dec. 19 

Last day to petition for January graduation Thursday, Oct. 15 
Thanksgiving recess, no classes Monday, Nov. 23 - 

Saturday, Nov. 28 



Winter Term 1999 



Monday, Jan. 4 - Saturday, April 3 

Commencement 

Last day to petition for May graduation 
Good Friday, no classes — 
a make-up class will be scheduled 



TBA 

Monday, March 1 

Friday, April 2 



Spring Term 1999 



Monday, April 5 - Saturday, July 3 

Commencement 
Memorial Day, no classes — 

a make-up class will be scheduled 
Last day to petition for awarding of 

degrees in August 



TBA 

Monday, May 31 
Tuesday, June 15 



Summer Term 1999 Wednesday, July 7 - Thursday, Aug. 19 



CONTENTS 



Calendar ....: 7 

The University 13 

The Graduate School 14 

Accreditation 14 

History 15 

The University's Academic Schools 15 

New Haven and the Campus 17 

Admission 18 

Admission of International Students 20 

Academic Policies 23 

Tuition, Fees and Financial Aid 31 

Student and Academic Services 35 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 
Doctor of Science Degree 

Management Systems (Sc.D.) 95 

Master's Degree Programs 

Accounting (M.S.) 45 

Financial Accounting specialization 46 

Managerial Accounting specialization ... 46 

Taxation specialization 46 

Business Administration (M.B.A.) 46 

Accounting concentration 49 

Business Policy and Strategy 

concentration 49 

Computer and Information Science 

concentration 50 

Finance concentration 50 

Health Care Management 

concentration 51 

Health Care Marketing concentration .... 51 
Human Resources Management 

concentration 52 

Industrial Engineering concentration 52 

International Business concentration 52 

Logistics concentration 53 



Management and Organization 

concentration 53 

Management Science concentration 54 

Marketing concentration 54 

Operations Research concentration 54 

Public Relations concentration 55 

Sports Management concentration 55 

Technology Management concentration.. 55 

Business Administration/Industrial 
Engineering (M.B.A. /M.S.l.E. 

dual degree) 56 

Business Administration/Public 
Administration (M.B.A./M.P.A. 

dual degree) 57 

Cellular and Molecular Biology (M.S.) 58 

Community Psychology (M.A.) 59 

Community-Clinical Services 

concentration 61 

Mental Retardation Services 

concentration 61 

Program Development concentration 61 

Computer and Information Science (M.S.) . 61 
Concentration Course options 

Criminal Justice (M.S.) 64 

Correctional Counseling concentration ... 65 
Criminal Justice Management 

concentration 65 

Security Management concentration 65 

Education (M.S.): Teacher Certification 66 

Education (M.S.): Advanced Programs in 
Professional Education 68 

Education: School Administration 

(Sixth Year Professional Diploma) 69 

Electrical Engineering (M.S.) 70 

Electrical Engineering option 71 

Computer Engineering option 72 

Environmental Engineering (M.S.) 73 

Water Resources concentration 74 

Water and Wastewater treatment 
concentration 74 



10 

Industrial and Hazardous Wastes 

concentration 74 

Environmental Science (M.S.) 75 

Environmental Ecology concentration ... 76 
Environmental Geoscience 

concentration 76 

Environmental Health and 

Management concentration 77 

Geographical Information Systems 

and Applications concentration 77 

Executive M.B.A 77 

Finance and Financial Services (M.S.) 78 

Personal Financial Planning 

(CFP Option) concentration 79 

Financial Services Management (CFA 

Option) concentration 79 

Corporate Financial Management 

concentration (CFM Option) 79 

Fire Science (M.S.) 80 

Administration concentration 81 

Technology concentration 81 

Forensic Science (M.S.) 81 

Advanced Investigation concentration... 83 

Criminalistics concentration 83 

Fire Science concentration 83 

Health Care Administration (M.S.) 83 

Health Care Marketing concentration 84 

Health Policy and Finance 

concentration 84 

Human Resource Management in 

Health Care concentration 84 

Long-Term Care concentration 84 

Managed Care concentration 85 

Medical Group Management 

concentration 85 

Hospitality and Tourism (M.S.) 85 

Hospitality concentration 87 

Tourism concentration 87 

Human Nutrition (M.S.) 88 

Industrial Engineering (M.S.I.E.) 88 

Industrial Hygiene (M.S.) 90 

Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

(M.A.) 91 

Industrial-Personnel Psychology 

concentration 93 

Organizational Psychology 

concentration 93 

Psychology of Conflict Management 

concentration 93 

Industrial Relations (M.S.) 94 

Mechanical Engineering (M.S.M.E.) 98 

Occupational Safety and Health 

Management (M.S.) 99 



Industrial Hygiene concentration 100 

Operations Research (M.S.) 101 

Public Administration (M.P.A.) 102 

City Management concentration 102 

Community-Clinical Services 

concentration 102 

Educational Administration 

concentration 103 

Health Care Management 

concentration 103 

Long-Term Health Care concentration . 104 

Personnel and Labor Relations 

concentration 104 

Taxation (M.S.) 104 

Corporate Taxation specialization 105 

Public Taxation specialization 106 

Graduate Certificates 

Accounting 107 

Applications of Psychology 108 

Arson Investigation 108 

Business Management 108 

Civil Engineering Design 109 

Computer and Information Science 109 

Criminal Justice/Security Management.... 110 

Finance 110 

Fire Science/Administration and 

Technology 110 

Forensic Science/Advanced 

Investigation Ill 

Forensic Science /Criminalistics Ill 

Forensic Science/Fire Science Ill 

Geographical Information Systems Ill 

Health Care Management 112 

Hospitality and Tourism 112 

Human Resources Management 113 

Industrial Hygiene 113 

International Business 113 

International Relations 114 

Legal Studies 114 

Logistics 115 

Logistics/Advanced 115 

Long-Term Health Care 115 

Marketing 115 

Mental Retardation Services 116 

Occupational Safety 116 

Public Administration 117 

Public Management 117 

Public Safety Management 117 

Taxation 118 

Technology Management 118 

Telecommunications Management 118 



11 



Course Descriptions 119 

Board, Administration and 

Faculty 173 

Index 193 

Campus Map 200 

Application Forms back of book 



12 



THE 
UNIVERSITY 



The University of New Haven is a private, 
independent, comprehensive university 
based in southern New England, specializing 
in quality educational opportunities and 
preparation of both traditional and returning 
students for successful careers and self- 
reliant, productive service in a global society. 

The mission of UNH is to provide cutting- 
edge, career-oriented programs and broad 
intellectual and ethical enrichment for a 
diverse student body. 

The vision of the University of New Haven 

is to be the dominant career-oriented compre- 
hensive university in southern New England, 
noted for its ability to combine professional 
education with humanistic, scientific and 
social learning as well as research capability. 




UNH values: 

its graduates as true professionals; 

the centrality of a highly qualified 
faculty; 

ethical responsibility in its students, 
faculty and staff; 

the capability of offering a multiplicity 
of programs; 

innovation and adaptation to changing 
global and local conditions; 

integration of global perspectives into 
its programs and curricula; 

serving and learning from individuals 
of various cultures, backgrounds, 
beliefs and capabilities; 

a nurturing, small-college 
environment; 

providing students with individualized 
attention in every aspect of their 
educational experience; 

partnering with business, government 
and community to assist in meeting 
future challenges. 



14 



The Graduate School 



The graduate programs at the University 
of New Haven offer students the opportuni- 
ty to enhance skills and knowledge for 
already-chosen careers in highly technical 
and competitive fields. Other students 
studying at the graduate level are preparing 
to enter new careers or are planning to 
continue their education at the doctoral 
level. Most graduate programs offer 
multiple areas of specialization; flexibility 
in elective choices; opportunities for field 
work, internships, independent study and 
research; and the possibility of combining a 
cooperative education work experience as 
part of the curriculum. 

The university's faculty is outstanding in 
its combination of highly qualified, full- 
time academics (90 percent of whom hold 
doctoral or terminal degrees from a broad 
spectrum of prestigious institutions) and 
part-time faculty members employed in 
area businesses and professions who bring, 
in addition to academic degrees, practical 
insight and experience to the classroom. 

The Graduate School offers a doctoral 
degree in management systems, 30 master's 
level degree /diploma programs plus more 
than 30 graduate certificates. Classes are 
offered at locations across Connecticut. 

The main campus in West Haven offers 
all academic programs. Graduate courses 
in subjects related to business administra- 
tion and /or computer and information 
science as well as other disciplines are 
offered at off-campus locations in New 
London, Trumbull and Stamford in Con- 
necticut, and at Cyprus College in Nicosia, 
Cyprus. Graduate courses in education are 
offered at the main campus and at off- 
campus locations in New London, Darien, 
Newington, Newtown and Stonington. In 
addition to the main campus, the human 
nutrition master's program is also offered at 
satellite locations in San Francisco and Los 
Angeles. The master's in public administra- 
tion (M.P.A.) is also being offered in Tel 
Aviv, Israel. 

As this catalog goes to press, the 



university is in the process of opening a 
West Coast satellite master's program in 
forensic science at Sacramento, California. 
The forensic science program concentra- 
tions in advanced investigation and in fire 
science are expected to begin classes in 
September 1997. Planned for start-up in 
January 1998 at Sacramento is the master's 
program in fire science, with future sites for 
fire science programs anticipated in the bay 
area of San Francisco and in the Los Ange- 
les basin. 

Graduate School courses are offered on a 
13-week trimester schedule, beginning in 
September, January and April. A condensed 
summer term is also offered. Most graduate 
courses are scheduled during the early 
evenings and on Saturdays to meet the 
needs of part-time, employed students. 

Accreditation 

The University of New Haven is a 
coeducational, nonsectarian, independent 
institution of higher learning, chartered by 
the General Assembly of the State of 
Connecticut. 

The University of New Haven is 
accredited by the New England Association 
of Schools and Colleges, Inc., a nongovern- 
mental, nationally recognized organization 
whose affiliated institutions include 
elementary schools through collegiate 
institutions offering postgraduate instruc- 
tion. 

Accreditation of an institution by the 
New England Association indicates that it 
meets or exceeds criteria for the assessment 
of institutional quality periodically applied 
through a peer group review process. An 
accredited school or college is one which 
has available the necessary resources to 
achieve its stated mission through 
appropriate educational programs, is 
substantially doing so, and gives reasonable 
evidence that it will continue to do so in the 
foreseeable future. Institutional integrity is 
also addressed through accreditation. 

Accreditation by the New England 
Association is not partial but applies to the 
institution as a whole. As such, it is not a 
guarantee of the quality of every course or 



program offered, or the competence of 
individual graduates. Rather, it provides 
reasonable assurance about the quality of 
opportunities available to students who 
attend the institution. 

The university's School of Business has 
been admitted to candidacy status for 
accreditation by the American Assembly of 
Collegiate Schools of Business. Candidacy 
status is an indication that an institution has 
voluntarily committed to participate in a 
systematic program of quality enhancement 
and continuous improvement that makes 
AACSB accreditation a more realistic and 
operational objective. Candidacy is not 
accreditation and does not guarantee 
eventual accreditation. 

The university is a member of the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology (ABET) and the university's 
bachelor of science degree programs in 
chemical, civil, electrical, industrial and 
mechanical engineering are accredited by its 
Engineering Accreditation Commission 
(EAC/ABET). 

The university holds membership in the 
Council of Graduate Schools, the Northeast- 
ern Association of Graduate Schools, the 
Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology, the National Association of 
Schools of Public Affairs and Administra- 
tion (NASPAA), the National Association of 
Boards of Examiners for Nursing Home 
Administration, the American Council on 
Education, the Association of American 
Colleges, the National Association of 
Independent Colleges and Universities, the 
College Entrance Examination Board and is 
a member of other regional and national 
professional organizations. 

History 

The University of New Haven was 
founded in 1920 as the New Haven YMCA 
Junior College, a branch of Northeastern 
University. The college became New Haven 
College in 1926 by an act of the Connecticut 
General Assembly. The college moved to its 
current location in 1960. 

In 1969, New Haven College added the 



The Graduate School 15 

Graduate School to its established baccalau- 
reate programs. Initially offering programs 
in business administration and industrial 
engineering, the Graduate School expanded 
rapidly. Today a doctoral program, 30 
master's level programs and additional 
courses have pushed graduate enrollment 
to about 2,500. 

On the fiftieth anniversary of the found- 
ing of the college in 1970, New Haven 
College became the University of New 
Haven, reflecting the increased scope and 
the diversity of academic programs offered. 

Today the university offers more than 
100 graduate and undergraduate degree 
programs in six schools: the Graduate 
School; the College of Arts and Sciences; the 
School of Business; the School of Engineer- 
ing; the School of Hotel, Restaurant, Tour- 
ism and Dietetics Administration; and the 
School of Public Safety and Professional 
Studies. 

The University's Academic 
Schools 

The University of New Haven has five 
academic schools-each with its own faculty 
and set of graduate programs. 

The College of Arts and Sciences 

The College of Arts and Sciences, 
through the Graduate School, offers 
master's degree programs in six fields: 
master of science degrees in cellular and 
molecular biology, education, environmen- 
tal science, and human nutrition; master of 
arts degrees in community psychology and 
industrial /organizational psychology. 
Within the field of education, three options 
are available: master of science degrees in 
teacher certification and professional 
education plus a sixth-year diploma in 
school administration. The human nutri- 
tion program is offered part-time, one 
weekend per month, at the main campus in 
West Haven and at two locations in Califor- 
nia: San Francisco and Los Angeles. The 
environmental science program provides 
many opportunities for field and laboratory 
experience along with classroom instruc- 
tion, while students in cellular and molecu- 



16 

lar biology are training for specialized 
careers in the fields of biotechnology, basic 
science and pharmacological research. 
Graduate certificates provide short, specific 
programs in several fields including Geo- 
graphical Information Systems (GIS) and 
psychology. 

At the undergraduate level, the College of 
Arts and Sciences offers associate and 
bachelor's degree programs in a wide variety 
of fields from art to dental hygiene, music 
and sound recording to psychology. A 
combined five-year B.S./M.S. program in 
environmental science is offered for students 
who meet certain qualifications. Undergradu- 
ate certificates offer specialized instruction to 
students interested in short, concentrated 
study in fields such as paralegal studies and 
graphic design. Detailed information can be 
found in the Undergraduate Catalog. 

The School of Business 

The mission of the School of Business at 
the University of New Haven is to provide 
quality, career-oriented education to students 
with varied backgrounds and experiences. 
The School of Business will seek to accom- 
plish this through comprehensive teaching 
programs and by engaging in a variety of 
research and consulting activities involving 
both the development and communication of 
knowledge to the academic, business and 
government sectors. It is the vision of the 
school to be the regional leader in providing 
career-oriented, contemporary business 
education. 

As the business environment becomes 
more complex, the School of Business 
provides contemporary educational experi- 
ences of high quality in order to prepare 
students who are ready to face the chal- 
lenges of a dynamic, modern world and to 
meet their responsibilities within a global 
society. To meet this goal, career-oriented 
programs are provided, employing current 
knowledge and techniques presented in a 
manner appropriate to the diverse back- 
grounds and experiences of graduate 
students. 

Through the Graduate School, the School 



of Business offers an M.B.A. program and 
master's degree programs in a number of 
other fields: accounting, finance and financial 
services, health care administration, indus- 
trial relations and taxation. A master's in 
public administration (M.P.A.) as well as two 
dual degrees, M.B.A./M.P.A. and M.B.A./ 
M.S. Industrial Engineering, are also avail- 
able. The School of Business also offers an 
executive M.B.A. program. In addition, more 
than a dozen graduate certificates are avail- 
able for students who seek a short graduate 
curriculum concentrated in a specific busi- 
ness area. 

At the undergraduate level, the 
School of Business offers associate and 
bachelor's degree programs in the depart- 
ments of accounting, communication and 
marketing, economics and finance, interna- 
tional business and management. Descrip- 
tive information can be found in the 
university's Undergraduate Catalog. 

The School of Engineering and 
Applied Science 

Few professions can match engineering 
for challenge and excitement, and the 
changing face of engineering will shape the 
world in the twenty-first century — a world 
of exotic materials, new sources of energy, 
staggering telecommunications and com- 
puting capabilities, cybernetic factories and 
public works needed by society. The 
mission of the School of Engineering and 
Applied Science is to prepare individuals 
for the professional practice of engineering 
and science, and for continual life-long 
education to keep abreast of new develop- 
ments. 

Master of science degree programs are 
offered by the School of Engineering and 
Applied Science — through the Graduate 
School — in computer and information 
science, electrical engineering, environmental 
engineering, industrial engineering, mechani- 
cal engineering and operations research. A 
dual degree program combines the M.B.A. 
with the M.S.I.E. degree. Graduate certifi- 
cates are offered in civil engineering design, 
computer science and logistics. 



At the undergraduate level, the School of 
Engineering and Applied Science offers 
degrees in chemistry and computer science 
along with its five EAC/ABET accredited 
engineering degrees in chemical, civil, 
electrical, industrial and mechanical engi- 
neering. Details are included in the UNH 
Undergraduate Catalog. 

The School of Hotel, Restaurant, 
Tourism and Dietetics 
Administration 

A master's degree in hospitality and 
tourism, as well as a graduate certificate, are 
offered through the Graduate School by the 
School of Hotel, Restaurant, Tourism and 
Dietetics Administration (HRTDA). Because 
of the unique demands of the hospitality 
industry, students are provided with both 
classroom instruction and hands-on work 
experience in the field, learning to translate 
theory into reality in order to provide the 
highest levels of service by dealing effectively 
with a diverse workforce and demanding 
clientele. 

Undergraduate degree programs 
are offered by the School of HRTDA in 
dietetics and hotel and restaurant manage- 
ment, with an optional concentration in 
tourism and travel. Undergraduate certifi- 
cates are available in the hotel and tourism 
fields. Information on undergraduate study 
is contained in the Undergraduate Catalog. 

The School of Public Safety and 
Professional Studies 

Through the Graduate School, the 
university's School of Public Safety and 
Professional Studies offers career-oriented, 
graduate degree programs in criminal 
justice, fire science, forensic science (includ- 
ing the criminalistics laboratory program), 
industrial hygiene, and occupational safety 
and health management. A wide range of 
graduate certificates are available in the 
same fields for students seeking shorter 
study in specific subcategories of these 
disciplines. 

Broad professional education is pro- 
vided, often incorporating classroom 



The Graduate School 17 

learning with laboratory and field experi- 
ence. TTie programs attract students of 
varied ages and levels of expertise, from 
persons new in the field to seasoned 
professionals seeking national and /or 
regional accreditation and licensure. 

Safety and professional degree programs 
and certificates also are offered at tihe 
undergraduate level in all the same fields, 
plus paralegal studies and aviation. Infor- 
mation on undergraduate programs ap- 
pears in the Undergraduate Catalog. 

The New Haven Area 

The University of New Haven is located 
in south central Connecticut, between New 
York City and Boston, Massachusetts. 
Situated on a West Haven hillside overlook- 
ing Long Island Sound, the campus is easily 
accessible by car (from Interstate 95), bus 
and train service as well as local airports. 

New Haven, just ten minutes away from 
the campus, is a city where arts and cultural 
activities flourish and coexist with science 
and business. Settled in 1638 and rich in 
history and heritage. New Haven is proud 
of its past, prouder of its present and 
actively plarming for its future. The city is a 
manufacturing center, a deep-water harbor, 
a major art center, a college town with 
seven colleges and universities in the 
immediate area, and the "Gateway to New 
England." 

New Haven is home to the Shubert, 
Long Wharf and Yale Repertory theaters; 
the New Haven Symphony; and a number 
of museums including the Peabody Mu- 
seum of Natural History, the Eli Whitney 
Museum, the Yale Center for British Art, 
and the oldest university gallery in the 
western hemisphere, the Yale Art Gallery. 

The Campus 

The university's 73-acre campus contains 
25 buildings that house modern laboratory 
and library facilities, the latest computer 
equipment, an athletic complex and 
residential facilities. 

The Main Campus includes administra- 
tion and classroom facilities in Ellis C. 



18 



Maxcy Hall (the main administration 
building), the Admissions and Financial Aid 
Building, the Phillip Kaplan Hall of Gradu- 
ate Studies, the Jacob F. Buckman Hall of 
Engineering and Applied Science, Echlin 
Hall (which houses Information Services, 
the Computer Science Department and the 
Executive M.B.A. office and classroom), the 
Marvin K. Peterson Library, the Student 
Center, the Psychology Building, Robert B. 
Dodds Hall (which has classrooms, offices 
and laboratories), Bethel Hall (home to the 
ELS Language Center), the Campus Store, 
residence halls and the Gatehouse. 

The South Campus includes Harugari 
Hall, which houses the School of Hotel, 
Restaurant, Tourism and Dietetics Adminis- 
tration, and South Campus Hall where 
students will find the Student Records 
Office, the School of Public Safety and 
Professional Studies and other departments. 
The university's athletic fields and Charger 
Gymnasium are located at the North 
Campus site. 

The University of New Haven is also 
home to The Alliance Theater and to 
Orchestra New England. These two artistic, 
cultural performance organizations have 
been in residence on the UNH campus for a 
number of years. 

Admission 

General Requirements 

Applicants to the University of New 
Haven Graduate School are required to 
hold a baccalaureate degree from an accred- 
ited institution. Certain programs have 
additional requirements for admission, 
details of which are included in the pro- 
gram listings in this catalog. 

Please Note: At press time, new applica- 
tions were not currently being accepted for 
the doctoral program. For additional 
information, contact the Director of the 
Sc.D. program or the Graduate Admissions 
Office. 

In addition, please note: New Applica- 
tions will not be accepted after the date of 
September 15, 1997 for the curriculum 



currently in effect for the master's program 
in hospitality and tourism. For information 
regarding future plans for graduate study in 
this field, contact the program director or 
the Graduate Admissions Office. 

Admission decisions are based primarily 
on an applicant's undergraduate record. A 
prospective student who is currently 
completing undergraduate study should 
submit an official transcript complete to the 
date of application. In most cases, an 
admission decision will be made on the 
basis of a partial transcript, contingent upon 
completion of the baccalaureate degree. 
Registration will not be permitted until a 
final, official transcript is submitted to the 
Graduate Admissions Office. 

Students may submit scores from the 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE), the 
Graduate Management Admission Test 
(GMAT) or the Miller Analogies Test in 
support of their applications. Students 
applying to certain programs (e.g., the 
M.B.A. program) will be required to submit 
test scores (sent directly from the testing 
service to the Graduate Admissions Office) 
from one of the above examinations. 
Information regarding specific requirements 
for submission of test scores is contained in 
the program descriptions elsewhere in this 
catalog. 

All students entering the university 
must comply with state laws regarding 
immunizations for measles and rubella. 
Applicants to the Graduate School must 
complete the Measles Immunization Form 
and return it to the UNH Health Services 
Office. In addition, students enrolling at 
UNH for full-time study must also file a 
completed Health Examination Report with 
the Health Services Office. Medical forms 
and information can be obtained by contact- 
ing the Health Services Office at (203) 932- 
7079 or 1-800-DIAL-UNH, Ext. 7079. 

It is the policy of the university to 
withhold registration at the beginning of 
each term for noncompliance. 

Procedure 

An applicant for admission to the 
Graduate School must submit the formal 



The Graduate School 19 



application form, two letters of recommen- 
dation (three letters plus additional forms 
and an essay for education /teacher certifi- 
cation), complete official transcripts of all 
previous college work (sent directly from 
colleges to the Graduate Admissions 
Office), the nonrefundable application fee 
and test scores (if required). Application 
materials are located in the back of this 
catalog. 

In addition to the above application 
materials, all students must submit a 
completed measles /rubella immunization 
form to the Health Services Office. All full- 
time students are also required to submit 
the Health Examination Report. 

In most cases, part-time, domestic 
students may be admitted for any term with 
the exception applicants to the master of 
science in forensic science and the master of 
science in cellular and molecular biology 
who are admitted for the fall term only. In 
addition, the master of science in mechani- 
cal engineering is available only as a part- 
time program. In a few cases, students 
(including international students required 
to maintain full-time enrollment based on 
immigration requirements) who are apply- 
ing for full-time study may be notified that 
certain programs are limited to admission 
in the fall term only due to the planned 
sequence of courses. Should a student be 
unable to enter the Graduate School during 
the term for which admission is granted, the 
acceptance will remain open for one calen- 
dar year. After one year, a new application 
for admission may be required. 

Students accepted into a program will be 
subject to the specific program require- 
ments and rules of the Graduate Catalog in 
effect for the term in which the student 
enrolls /enrolled in the first course in that 
degree program. However, if a student 
subsequently submits a program change 
request and is accepted into a new or 
different program /degree, the student will 
be subject to the rules of the Graduate 
Catalog in effect at the date /time of accep- 
tance into the newly selected program. 

Admission Categories 

Admitted applicants and students in the 



Graduate School are assigned to one of four 
categories: fully accepted, provisionally 
accepted, special or auditor. 

Domestic students who wish to matricu- 
late in a degree program, but who have not 
completed the application process and /or 
have not yet received a formal acceptance 
decision, may register as in-process stu- 
dents for one term while completing the 
application process. 

A bachelor's degree is required for 
admission to all categories listed below. 

Fully Accepted 

Students accepted without special 
stipulations for entrance into a regular 
degree program or certificate study are 
classified as fully accepted students. 

Provisionally Accepted 

An applicant whose undergraduate 
grade point average falls below the stan- 
dard set for full acceptance, or whose 
undergraduate background otherwise 
indicates a need for additional coursework 
or a short period of academic supervision 
and review, may be accepted provisionally. 
Students accepted provisionally should 
seek advice from the appropriate coordina- 
tor or adviser during the provisional 
period. 

Students must complete the require- 
ments stipulated in the provisional accep- 
tance at the beginning of the program of 
study. Upon completion of the provisional 
requirements, each student's record will be 
evaluated for admission as a fully matricu- 
lated candidate for the degree. 

Special (Nonmatriculated) 

Special student status is reserved for 
students who do not wish to matriculate in 
a degree program or certificate study. 
Registration in this category is limited to no 
more than 12 credit hours of graduate work. 
Students who wish to continue graduate 
work must be accepted into a specific 
graduate program. Special students are 
responsible for meeting prerequisite re- 
quirements for the courses they wish to 
take. 



20 

Auditor 

An auditor is allowed to attend class and 
is expected to participate in class discus- 
sions and complete the required assign- 
ments. An auditor receives no grade or 
credit toward any degree. While auditor 
status does not imply admission to any of 
the graduate degree programs, there is an 
official registration procedure and a nota- 
tion of audit placed on the transcript. Both 
current students and new students are 
eligible to audit University of New Haven 
Graduate School courses. 

An alumni audit program provides 
UNH degree-holding alumni/ae with a 
low-cost method of upgrading information 
and skills obtained in the process of com- 
pleting their degrees at the University of 
New Haven. This program is not intended 
for the development of new skills or for the 
learning of new or more advanced topics. 
Therefore, the courses available (space 
permitting) to alumni auditors are limited 
to those at or below the level of the UNH 
degree obtained by the student. 

Admission of International 
Students 

University of New Haven graduate 
programs are open to qualified interna- 
tional students. To qualify for graduate 
school, a prospective student must have 
completed sufficient undergraduate prepa- 
ration in a degree program acceptable to the 
University of New Haven Graduate School. 

Because the review of applications from 
international students takes considerable 
time, it is important that international 
student applications and all supporting 
materials be received by the Graduate 
Admissions Office prior to the deadline 
dates outlined in the international student 
information packet. 

U.S. Immigration regulations require 
that a student holding student status make 
satisfactory progress toward a degree. 

Satisfactory progress requires full-time 
study, which is generally interpreted to 
mean completing at least three courses each 
trimester. Prospective international stu- 



dents should note that graduate certificates, 
the mechanical engineering master's 
program and the human nutrition master's 
program are not designed to permit full- 
time study. Also, the programs in the 
Education Department do not accept 
international student applications. 

To apply for admission to the Graduate 
School and to be ready to begin study, 
prospective international students must 
complete all of the steps outlined in the 
following section. 

International Application Process 

All applicants must submit the following 
application materials: 

1. A completed application form and the 
appropriate application fee. 

2. Two letters of recommendation. 

3. Official transcripts of all undergraduate 
work and graduate work completed. 
Applicants may be asked to provide 
substantiation of courses taken, grades 
received and/or the academic reputa- 
tion of the undergraduate school within 
the educational system of the country in 
which the school is located. A certified 
English translation must accompany all 
non-English transcripts. 

4. Proof of English proficiency. This must 
consist of one of the following: 

a. The Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL) examination with 
a score of 520 or above. The official 
score report must be sent directly 
from the testing service /site to the 
Graduate Admissions Office. 

b. Proof of completion of Level 109 in an 
ELS Language Center program. 
Special arrangements may be made 
through the Graduate Admissions 
Office for such training at the ELS 
Language Center located at the 
University of New Haven. 

c. Proof that undergraduate academic 
instruction and courses were com- 
pleted using the English language. 
Students whose TOEFL scores are less 
than 560 and/or students luho enter the 
Graduate School following completion of 
an intensive English language training 



The Graduate School 21 



program are required to take and pass 
E 600 English Language Workshop in the 
first term of enrollment at the Graduate 
School. 

5. Financial documentation. International 
students must provide verification of 
sufficient funds for study and living 
expenses at the University of New 
Haven for 12 months. This verification 
must be one of the following: 

a. Completed University of New Haven 
Financial Statement of International 
Students form and supporting 
documents. 

b. Current official scholarship letter. The 
University of New Haven does not offer 
need-based financial assistance to 
international students. 

6. Acceptance fee of $200. This nonrefund- 
able fee must be paid before immigra- 
tion documents (IAP-66 for J-1 students 
or Form 1-20 AB for students entering the 
United States on F-1 visas) will be 
issued. This fee is not credited toward 
tuition and is not required in advance 
for scholarship students. 

7. Medical Forms. All students entering 
the University of New Haven must 
comply with health requirements by 
submitting the following forms required 
by the UNH Health Services Office: 

a. Measles /Rubella Immunization Form 
(required for all students) 

b. Health Examination Report (required 
for all full-time students). 

Appropriate documents (Form IAP-66 
for J-1 visa/status or Form I-20AB for F-1 
visa/status) will be issued only after a 
student has submitted all required materi- 
als, has been accepted in a program of 
study, has provided acceptable proof of 
English proficiency and financial status, 
and has paid the $200 acceptance fee. 

The international student acceptance fee 
is required of all international undergradu- 
ate and graduate students at the university. 
This fee directly and indirectly supports a 
variety of services and programs for 
international students including: orientation 
programs, cross-cultural workshops, local 
community activities, international alumni 



programs, subscriptions to International 
newspapers /magazines for the campus 
library and operation of the International 
Services Office. 

Initial Attendance at the university. All 
international students accepted into the 
Graduate School must report to the Interna- 
tional Services Office before registering for 
graduate classes. 

At the time of registration, students will 
be required to pay the tuition and fees for 
one trimester. 

International students must subscribe to 
the university's international student health 
insurance. The premium of $599 per year 
will be charged to all international students. 
Requests for information regarding coverage 
and /or premiums for dependents should be 
directed to the Health Services department. 

Registration 

Registration deadlines are listed in the 
course schedules published for each term. 
Returning students and new domestic 
students who have been admitted to 
programs will receive registration materials 
and can register by mail. 

Domestic students who have not com- 
pleted the application process and /or have 
not yet received a formal acceptance 
decision may register as in-process students 
for most programs. International students 
may not register as in-process students. In- 
process students may not receive registra- 
tion materials in the mail, but they may 
register in person at the main campus or at 
an off-campus registration session. Proof 
that the in-process student has an under- 
graduate degree will be required at the time 
of registration; and, whenever possible, 
transcripts of previous coursework should 
be provided to facilitate advisement. In- 
process status remains in effect for one 
term. In-process students may register for 
no more than six credits without the ap- 
proval of the Director of Graduate Admis- 
sions or the coordinator of the program for 
which they are applying. 

It is the responsibility of in-process 
students to see to it that all materials in 
support of their applications are received by 



22 

the Graduate Admissions Office in time for 
an acceptance decision before the next term. 
In-process students will not be permitted to 
register for a second term until an accep- 
tance decision has been made. Permission 
to register as an in-process student does not 
guarantee admission to the Graduate 
School. 

Students who fail to register for three 
consecutive terms will no longer receive 
registration materials. It will be the 
responsibility of such students to notify the 
Student Records Office of their desire to 
continue graduate study. Files for students 
who revert to an inactive status will be 
retained for two years. At the end of that 
period, only a permanent record of credits 
earned is maintained. 

Students may not add a course after the 
first week of class unless written permission 
of the instructor is received. Course addi- 
tions may be handled in person or by mail. 

A student may not withdraw from a 
course any time after the seventh scheduled 
class meeting without permission of the 
instructor. Course withdrawals may be 
handled in person, by mail or by fax. 

The university reserves the right to 
change class schedules or instructors at any 
time. It further reserves the right to cancel 
any course, and, in such cases, will refund 
full tuition to the students. 

Students with an outstanding balance 
will not be permitted to register. Current 
students who register after the registration 
deadline will be assessed a late registration 
fee. 



ACADEMIC 
POLICIES 



Academic Honesty and Ethics 

The policies of the University of New 
Haven require commitment to academic 
honesty and ethics. Violations of university 
standards for academic honesty (including 
plagiarism), whether in fact or in spirit, will 
usually be handled by the faculty member 
involved. However, if sufficient reason is 
found, violation may be grounds for 
dismissal from the Graduate School. 

Students are expected to complete all 
course requirements on their own initiative, 
with no collaboration unless specifically 
authorized by the instructor. In addition, 
use of the work, ideas or knowledge of 
another person, publisher, company, 
government or organization must be 
properly identified by reference or footnote 
in all materials submitted by the student. 

Students wishing to appeal the decision 
of a faculty member regarding academic 
honesty and ethics should contact the Office 
of the Dean of Graduate Studies. 

Access to Academic Records 

Academic records are maintained on 
each student enrolled in the Graduate 
School. These records are housed in the 
Student Records Office, located in South 
Campus Hall. The following types of 
academic records are maintained: the 
application for admission and supporting 
documents such as test scores, transcripts of 
undergraduate and other prior study, letters 
of recommendation, registration forms. 



grade lists, course schedules, petitions filed 
by the student and any other documents or 
correspondence pertaining to the student's 
academic work. 

The Registrar is responsible for control- 
ling access to and disclosure of students' 
educational records. Students desiring to 
inspect or review their academic records 
should address a written, dated request to 
the Registrar for Graduate Records. 

Information regarding confidentiality, 
privacy and right of access to student 
records can be obtained from the Registrar. 

Attendance 

It is the responsibility of the student to 
meet all classes and to take all examinations 
as scheduled. Faculty have the right to 
require a standard of attendance, even if it 
conflicts with professional and job-related 
responsibilities of students. Students whose 
jobs require that they be absent from class 
must realize that it is their responsibility to 
determine whether such absence is permit- 
ted by the faculty member involved and to 
meet the professor's requirements for 
making up work missed, if the professor 
allows missed time to be made up. 

Make-up Policy 

Make-up examinations are a privilege 
extended to students at the discretion of the 
instructor, who may grant permission for 
make-up examinations to those students 
who miss an exam as a result of a medical 



24 



problem, personal emergency or previously 
announced absence. On the other hand, 
instructors may choose to adopt a "no 
makeup" policy 

A make-up test fee may be assessed 
when a student is permitted to make up an 
announced test during the term or to take 
an end-of-term exam at a time other than 
the scheduled time. In either case, the 
make-up examination fee will be paid by 
the student at the Business Office. 

Academic Standards 

Grading System 

The Graduate School uses the following 
grading system: 

Superior performance: 

A+ = 4.30 quality points 
A = 4.00 quality points 
A- = 3.70 quality points 

Good performance: 

B+ = 3.30 quality points 
B = 3.00 quality points 
B- = 2.70 quality points 

Passing performance: 

C+ = 2.30 quality points 
C = 2.00 quality points 
C- = 1.70 quality points 

Failure: 

F = Zero quality points 

P = Zero quality points 

Pass; carries credit hours toward the 
degree. Use generally limited to 
dissertation, thesis and Executive 
M.B.A. courses. 

P+ = Zero quality points 

Pass with distinction; carries credit 
hours toward the degree. Use limited 
to Executive M.B.A. courses. 

S = Zero quality points 

Satisfactory performance in a non- 
credit course. 

U = Zero quality points 

Unsatisfactory performance in a 
noncredit course. 

W = Zero quality points 
Withdrawal from a course 



I = Zero quality points 

Incomplete; see policy rules below 
regarding incomplete courses. 

T = Zero quality points 

Used for thesis students who have not 
completed work during the term in 
which they originally registered for 
the course. Students must complete 
the work within the time limit for 
completion of the degree. 

AU = Zero quality points 

Audit; indicates that a student 
registered for and attended a class, 
but received no credit toward any 
degree. 

Some employers require that a letter 
grade (A+ through C-, or F) be awarded if a 
student is to receive tuition reimbursement. 
It is the student's responsibility, in a non- 
credit course, to inform the faculty member 
of the need for a letter grade. 

The grading system displayed above, 
with plus and minus designations allowed, 
became effective beginning with the fall 
trimester 1987. Prior to that date, including 
the summer term 1987, plus and minus 
grades were not used. 

Grade Reports 

Reports of the final grade in each subject 
will be mailed to the student from the 
Student Records Office soon after the close 
of each term, providing all financial obliga- 
tions have been met. 

Incomplete Coursework 

A grade of Incomplete (I) is given only in 
special circumstances and indicates that the 
individual student has been given permis- 
sion by the instructor to complete the work 
for the course with the same instructor after 
the end of the trimester or term. If a student 
is required to attend the class sessions for 
the course in a subsequent term, tuition 
must be paid for this second attendance. 

Master 's-level students who receive a 
grade of I (Incomplete) should complete the 
work within three months after the end of 
the term in most cases. Master 's-level 
students may have a time period specified 
by the instructor, and not to exceed one 



year, to complete the work required for the 
course and have a grade submitted to the 
Graduate Registrar. 

Doctoral students enrolled in 700-level 
courses who receive a grade of I (Incom- 
plete) have a time period specified by the 
instructor, and not to exceed three months, 
to complete the work required for the 700- 
level course and have a grade submitted to 
the Graduate Registrar. 

Quality Point Ratio 

The academic standing of each student is 
determined on the basis of the quality point 
ratio (QPR) earned each term. Each letter 
grade is assigned a quality point value. 
These quality point values are shown in the 
preceding section describing the grading 
system. 

The quality point ratio is obtained by 
multiplying the quality point value of each 
grade by the number of credit hours as- 
signed to each course as listed in the 
catalog, then dividing the sum of the 
quality points earned by the number of 
credit hours attempted in courses for which 
a grade of A+ through C- or F is awarded. 

A cumulative quality point ratio is 
obtained by calculating the quality point 
ratio for all courses taken at the University 
of New Haven which are part of the degree 
program. 

Academic Probation 

Any student whose cumulative quality 
point ratio (QPR) is below 3.00, a 'B' aver- 
age, will be considered to be on academic 
probation, and may be required to obtain 
permission from the program coordinator 
before registering for additional 
coursework. A student at the master's level 
whose cumulative QPR is below 2.70 after 
completion of 24 credits will be required to 
withdraw from the Graduate School. A 
doctoral student whose cumulative QPR is 
below 3.00 after completion of 12 credits of 
doctoral coursework will be subject to 
dismissal. 

Appeals concerning required with- 
drawal from the Graduate School under 
these circumstances should be directed to 
the Dean of the Graduate School. 



Academic Policies 25 

Repetition of Work 

A student may repeat a course. The 
grade received in the second attempt would 
supersede the original grade in the compu- 
tation of the quality point ratio (QPR) if the 
second grade is higher. Both grades remain 
on the transcript. The course may be used 
only once for credit toward the require- 
ments for completion of the degree pro- 
gram. Repetition of work at the doctoral 
level is subject to limitations which are 
described elsewhere in this catalog. 

Awarding of Degrees 

The University of New Haven awards 
degrees three times a year, at commence- 
ment ceremonies in January and in May 
and without formal ceremony in August. A 
cumulative quality point ratio of 3.00 and 
completion of all program and university 
requirements are required for graduation 
and the conferring of master's degrees from 
the Graduate School. All students must file 
a graduation petition form in order to have 
their names placed on the list of potential 
graduates. 

A cumulative quality point ratio of 3.30 
in doctoral coursework, satisfactory 
completion of the written and oral doctoral 
comprehensive examinations, followed by 
successful completion and defense of the 
doctoral dissertation are required for 
graduation and the conferring of the 
doctoral degree. All doctoral candidates 
must also file a graduation petition form in 
order to have their names placed on the list 
of potential graduates. 

Students completing their degree 
requirements at the end of the fall term will 
receive their degrees in January. Students 
completing their degree requirements at the 
end of the winter term will receive their 
degrees at the May commencement. Stu- 
dents completing the requirements for their 
degrees at the end of the spring term or the 
summer session may be awarded their 
degrees on August 31. Students completing 
the requirements for their degrees in July or 
August, as well as receiving their diplomas 
in August, may request permission from the 
Office of the Registrar to participate in the 



26 

formal graduation ceremonies at the 
following January commencement. 

Petition for Graduation 

Candidates for the January commence- 
ment must file a graduation petition with 
the Student Records Office no later than 
October 15. Candidates for the May com- 
mencement must file a graduation petition 
with the same office no later than March 1. 
Candidates whose degrees will be awarded 
in August must file a graduation petition 
with the Student Records Office no later 
than June 15. 

Students completing the 5-year B.S./ 
M.S. program in Environmental Science, the 
M.B.A./M.RA. dual-degree program or the 
M.B.A./M.S.I.E. dual-degree program must 
fill out two graduation petition forms (one 
for each degree). However, students who 
petition for two degrees will pay the full 
graduation petition rate of $85 for the first 
degree plus a reduced rate of $50 for the 
second degree to be awarded at the same 
commencement date. 

Graduation petition forms for this 
purpose are available in the Student 
Records Office or Graduate School Dean's 
Office. Payment of the graduation fee must 
accompany the petition. 

Should a candidate not complete all the 
requirements for graduation before the 
deadline, after having filed the petition to 
graduate and paid the fee, the student will 
have to petition again at a later date. At that 
time, only the refiling fee will be charged. 

All financial obligations to the university 
must be met prior to graduation. 

Time Limit for Completion of 
Degree 

A student must complete all the require- 
ments for the master's degree or certificate 
within five years of the date of completion 
of the first course following formal applica- 
tion to the degree program. Any extension 
of the time limit for completion of the 
degree can be granted only by the Dean of 
Graduate Studies after consultation with 
the appropriate program coordinator. 

Students who reach the five-year limit 



with less than 24 graduate credits com- 
pleted at UNH will be required to apply for 
readmission to their programs, rather than 
for an extension. Students readmitted to a 
graduate program will begin the five-year 
time limit again and will be subject to the 
rules of the Graduate Catalog in effect at the 
date/time of the readmission. 

Students enrolled in the doctoral pro- 
gram must complete all coursework, pass 
the doctoral comprehensive examinations 
and successfully complete and defend the 
doctoral dissertation within eight years of 
the date of completion of the first doctoral 
course. 

Residency Requirements 

Degree programs have a 30-graduate- 
credit residency requirement, with the 
exception of the M.B.A. /M.S.I.E. and 
M.B.A./M.RA. dual degree programs 
which have a 60-graduate-credit residency 
requirement. Credits toward the residency 
requirement may be earned at the main 
campus or at the off-campus locations. All 
students should plan on taking at least 
some of their courses on the main campus. 
Credits applied toward the requirement for 
one graduate degree may not be counted 
toward the residency requirement for 
another graduate degree. In other words, 
completion of a minimum of an additional 
30-graduate-credit residency requirement is 
necessary for those students who plan to 
complete a second master's degree pro- 
gram. The university policies for transfer of 
credit and waiver of courses apply in the 
same manner to students who are candi- 
dates for a second master's degree as to 
those enrolling in their first master 's 
program. 

Full-Time Study 

A full-time course of study at the mas- 
ter 's level is defined as three courses in the 
current term. Required noncredit courses 
(E 600, HT 600) count toward full-time 
study. Under certain circumstances the 
department chair, the program coordinator 
and the Graduate School administration 
may approve a reduction in credits. 



Academic Policies 27 



Full-time study at the doctoral level is 
defined as registration for a minimum of 
four and a maximum of six doctoral courses 
per academic year of three trimesters. For 
international students who are required to 
maintain full-time enrollment for their 
immigration status, full-time doctoral study 
is defined as two doctoral courses per 
trimester for a total of six doctoral courses 
per academic year. Such persons will 
continue to be considered full-time students 
as long as their dissertation adviser, depart- 
ment chair and /or director of the doctoral 
program certify that the student is making 
satisfactory progress toward completion of 
the doctoral degree. (Part-time doctoral 
study consists of registration for an average 
of two doctoral courses per academic year). 

A student who wishes to enroll for more 
than 12 graduate credits/four courses in a 
given trimester must secure the permission 
of the program coordinator. 

In general, full-time enrollment is avail- 
able in all master's degree programs except 
the mechanical engineering program, the human 
nutrition master's degree and the graduate cer- 
tificates. In special cases, however, full-time 
registration may be available in the human 
nutrition program. 

It is important to note that all graduate 
programs may also be pursued on a part- 
time basis. 

Part-Time Study 

Part-time study at the master's level is 
defined as one or two courses in the current 
term. Half-time study at the master's level 
is defined as registration for two courses in 
the current term; registration for only one 
course is less than half-time study. 

Part-time study at the doctoral level 
consists of registration for an average of 
two doctoral courses per academic year. 

The certificates have limited scheduled 
offerings and, therefore, are generally 
pursued on a part-time basis. 

International students with F-1 or J-1 
immigration status may not enroll in study 
leading only to a certificate because these are 
part-time study plans. 



Transfer Credit 



Transfer credit may be given for gradu- 
ate courses taken at other regionally accred- 
ited institutions (which are recognized as 
such by the university) prior to matricula- 
tion at the University of New Haven, 
subject to the following conditions: 

• the courses were at the graduate level; 

• each grade was B- or better; and 

• the course did not fulfill requirements 
for any other degree already earned by 
the student. 

Coordinated Courses 

Graduate students currently matricu- 
lated at the university must secure written 
approval before taking courses at another 
institution if they plan to transfer that credit 
into their UNH programs. Course coordina- 
tion forms are available in the Graduate and 
Student Records Offices for this purpose. 

In all cases, an official transcript must be 
received directly from the institution where 
the course was taken and placed on file at 
UNH before transfer credit(s) will be 
awarded. Transfer credits and coordinated 
course credits are not included in courses 
used to establish a student's QPR or resi- 
dency requirement at the University of New 
Haven. 

Waiver of Courses 

Some programs permit waivers of core 
courses on the basis of undergraduate or 
graduate courses taken at accredited 
institutions. Waivers of elective courses 
and /or concentration courses are not 
permitted, nor are waivers based on experi- 
ence. In such cases, substitution of a more 
advanced course may be allowed. 

For a course to be waived, a student 
must first secure the written approval of the 
program coordinator, the department chair 
or a faculty member acting for the chair in 
the department in which the waiver is 
requested. Waiver requests should be 
submitted in writing to the program coordi- 
nator. 

Even if a waiver has been granted, a 



28 

student who wishes to take a waived 
course for review or as a refresher course 
may do so. 

Crediting Examinations 

Under certain circumstances, students 
who have independent knowledge of a 
specific course may apply for permission to 
take a crediting examination in lieu of 
taking the course. To qualify for a crediting 
examination, the student must have taken a 
similar course at either the graduate or 
undergraduate level; or have completed the 
equivalent work in noncredit training 
courses; or have had extensive, related, on- 
the-job experience. 

Crediting examinations are subject to the 
following conditions: 

• no letter grade is recorded other than P; 

• the crediting examination is for required 
courses only (not concentration courses 
or electives); 

• the credits awarded by examination do 
not count toward the residency require- 
ment; and 

• the crediting examination cannot be 
taken in the student's last trimester of 
study. 

Permission to take a crediting examina- 
tion must be granted by the department 
chair or program coordinator, the chair of 
the department in which the course is 
offered, and the Dean of Graduate Studies. 
Crediting Examination Permission Forms 
are available from the Graduate and Stu- 
dent Records Offices. 

Once permission has been granted and 
the crediting examination fee of $150 paid, 
the examination is administered and graded 
by a full-time faculty member designated 
by the chair of the department that offers 
the course. 

Prerequisites 

Students are expected to meet the 
prerequisite requirements for each course 
taken. Exceptions must be approved by the 
course instructor and the student's adviser 
or program coordinator. Credit may be denied 
to a student who takes a course without the 
prerequisites. 



Dropping/Adding a Class 

A student who wishes to make a change 
in class schedule must complete a "drop 
card" or an "add card" or both. These are 
available from the Graduate and Student 
Records Offices. Written permission of the 
instructor is required to add a class after the 
first class meeting. If a student withdraws 
from a class after the first class meeting, the 
tuition refund policy is applied. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Students who are required to take com- 
prehensive examinations in order to com- 
plete their degree programs must obtain the 
appropriate comprehensive examination 
approval form(s) from the Graduate and 
Student Records Offices, secure the neces- 
sary approvals and pay the required fees, if 
applicable. Students should confirm ar- 
rangements for comprehensive examina- 
tions with the program coordinator. 

Research Projects, 
Independent Study and 
Internships 

All academic programs leading to a de- 
gree require the completion of a thesis, a 
research or other special project, internship 
or comprehensive examination. Students 
must have the written approval of their 
advisers and department chairs prior to 
enrolling for project or internship credit on 
an individual basis. This is accomplished by 
completing the appropriate forms (available 
from the student's department or from the 
Graduate or Student Records Offices) and 
securing the required approvals. 

Students preparing a research project or 
independent study /internship report may 
be asked to follow the guidelines presented 
in the UNH Thesis Manual: A Guide for the 
Preparation of Graduate Theses and Disserta- 
tions, copies of which are on reserve at the 
library. 

In addition to the project requirement 
described above, students may (in certain 
cases) enroll for independent study/ 
internship under the supervision of a 



faculty adviser. A student may not register for 
more than a total of two courses (six credits of 
independent study/internship) zvithin a degree 
program. An independent study /internship 
proposal must be approved by the student's 
adviser or program coordinator as well as 
the coordinator or chair of the department 
offering the course. 

Thesis 

Preparation and completion of a thesis is 
optional for master's degree programs. A 
number of preliminary steps are required 
before registration for thesis will be ac- 
cepted by the Registrar. The student com- 
pletes the Proposal for Thesis form (avail- 
able at the Graduate School Dean's Office), 
in which the proposed subject, the 
methodology and the hypotheses are 
described. The student secures the approval 
signature of a faculty member who will 
serve as adviser. The student also must 
secure the approval of the proposed thesis 
and the thesis adviser from the department 
chair and /or program coordinator and the 
Dean of Graduate Studies. Only after the 
Registrar has received the approved form 
will the student be permitted to register for 
thesis. 

A thesis will carry no fewer than six 
academic credits taken over no fewer than 
two academic terms. A preliminary draft 
must be presented to the adviser at least 75 
days prior to commencement. Upon ap- 
proval by the adviser and program coordi- 
nator, unbound copies are presented to the 
Graduate School. A date and time will then 
be scheduled for the thesis defense before 
the student's thesis committee and the Dean 
of Graduate Studies. Successful defense of 
the thesis must be completed at least three 
weeks prior to the date of commencement. 
Students must complete and defend the 
thesis within the time limit for completion 
of the degree. 

After the successful defense and the 
approval of the thesis by the Dean of 
Graduate Studies, thesis credit is awarded 
and final, unbound copies of the thesis are 
deposited for binding at the university 
library where it becomes a part of the 



Academic Policies 29 

permanent collection. Additional copies of 
the thesis may be required by the depart- 
ment or the program coordinator. 

For guidance in the preparation of 
theses, graduate students should consult 
the university's Thesis Manual: A Guide for 
the Preparation of Graduate Theses and Disser- 
tations, copies of which are available in the 
Graduate School Dean's Office. Questions 
not resolved by the instructions should be 
settled in consultation with the adviser and 
by reference to a standard style manual. 

Information regarding the preparation 
and defense of the doctoral dissertation 
may be found on page ??. Additional details 
are outlined in the university's Thesis 
Manual: A Guide for the Preparation of Gradu- 
ate Theses and Dissertations, copies of which 
are available at the Graduate School Dean's 
Office or from the director of the doctoral 
program. 

The University of New Haven Graduate 
School participates in the University 
Microfilms, Inc., (UMI) Dissertation Ser- 
vices program and provides assistance to 
doctoral students for registration of disser- 
tations and copyrights. 

Academic Advising 

It is the student's responsibility to select 
courses in accordance with prerequisites, 
the adviser's recommendations, the 
departmental plan of study (if required) 
and the requirements for the degree. 

Students needing further explanation 
about program requirements or course 
sequencing should request academic 
advisement. Appointments for academic 
counseling should be scheduled through 
concentration advisers or program 
coordinators. Advisement sessions are held 
prior to each trimester. 

A student is not required to file a formal 
plan of study with the Graduate School. It is 
the student's responsibility to meet the 
stated requirements for the degree. 

Grievance Procedure 

A formal policy for the handling of 
student grievances is available in the 
Graduate School Dean's Office. 



30 

Diversity Policy 

The University of New Haven is 
committed to achieving a diverse and 
pluralistic community which reflects the 
multiracial and culturally diverse society in 
contemporary America. 

The Diversity Committee (a standing 
committee of the university) has been 
established to guide the university in 
implementing this Diversity Policy. The 
university will work toward attracting and 
retaining a diverse faculty, staff and student 
body for the purpose of creating a pluralis- 
tic scholarly community. The Committee 
will assist the administration in the devel- 
opment and implementation of programs 
and policies that support an enriched 
educational experience for a diverse univer- 
sity community. 

The University of New Haven does not 
discriminate in admissions, educational 
programs or employment against any 
individual on account of that individual's 
gender, race, color, religion, age, disability, 
sexual orientation, or national or ethnic 
origin. 

Drug-Free and Smoke-Free 
Environment 

In accordance with federal law concern- 
ing a drug-free campus environment, 
relevant university policy and regulations 
are provided for all current students and 
employees. Information is available upon 
request. 

No smoking is allowed in any campus 
administrative, academic or recreational 
building. This restriction applies to all UNH 
offices, classrooms, hallways, stairwells, 
restrooms, dining facilities, conference/ 
meeting facilities, athletic facilities and any 
other public spaces within these buildings. 
Smoking is to be confined to outdoor space; 
sand-filled ash receptacles are provided at 
building entrances to maintain a clean 
environment. 



Student Right-to-Know and 
Campus Security Act 

In accordance with Connecticut's Public 
Act 90-259 concerning campus safety and 
the 1990 federal law PLlOl-542: The Student 
Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act, 
all colleges and universities receiving state 
and federal financial assistance are required 
to maintain specific information related to 
campus crime statistics and security mea- 
sures, provide annually such information to 
all current students and employees, and 
make the data available to all prospective 
students and employees upon request. 

At the University of New Haven, the 
required information is compiled by the 
Campus Police Office and is published 
annually. 



TUITION, FEES AND 
FINANCIAL AID 



The following are the University of New 
Haven tuition, fees and charges which will 
be in effect for the fall 1997 term. The 
university reserves the right, at any time, to 
make whatever changes may be deemed 
necessary in admission requirements, fees, 
charges, tuition, policies, regulations and 
academic programs prior to the start of any 
class, semester, trimester or session. 

Master's Tuition 

Tuition, per credit hour $360 

Tuition, per 3-credit course 1,080 

Engineering tuition differential, 

per credit 25 

Executive M.B.A., per year 12,500 

Noncredit course fee, per course 690 

Auditor, per course 1,080 

E 600, English Language Workshop .... 1,080 

Master's Nonrefundable Fees 

Application fee $50 

Executive MBA application fee 50 

Auditor application fee 50 

Auditor course fee for UNH alumni/ ae, 

per course 50 

Continuing registration fee 25 

Co-op registration fee, full-time 100 

part-time 50 

Registration fee, per term 5 

Graduate Student Council fee, 

per term 8 

Graduation petition fee 85 

Late filing fee, after March 1 (May), 

June 15 (August), Oct. 15 (January) ... 125 



Graduation refiling fee 50 

Petition fee for two/dual degrees 135 

Health insurance fee (per year, all 

full-time, domestic students) 100 

International student acceptance fee 200 

International student health insurance 

premium (per year) 599 

Laboratory fees 20-100 

Late payment fee (after scheduled due 

date)* 25 

Late registration fee, current students 15 

Graduate certificate fee (payable upon 

completion of courses) 35 

Transcript fee/per copy 5 

Make-up examination fee 10 

Comprehensive examination fee 150 

Crediting examination fee 150 

Sc.D. Program Tuition and 
Fees 

Application fee (nonrefundable) $50 

Tuition, per 700-level course 1,850 

Dissertation tuition, per course 1,060 

Registration fee, per term 

(nonrefundable) 5 

Graduate Student Council fee, per term 

(nonrefundable) 8 

Qualifying examination fee (where 

applicable) 150 

Continuing registration fee 635 

Doctoral graduation petition fee 100 

Dissertation copyright and filing fee 85 

*A late fee plus 1 1/2 percetit per month penalty will be 
assessed on outstanding balances. 

continued on next page 



32 



Graduate Housing Costs 

Dunham Hall, single bedroom in 2- or 3- 
person suite, per student/ 

per trimester $1,570 

Nonrefundable room deposit, applied to 

housing charge for first trimester 250 

Refundable damage deposit 100 

Activity fee, per trimester 25 

Food Plan, declining balance option 

in $50 increments is available. 

Payment 

Tuition for graduate courses is due at 
registration. However, the university per- 
mits graduate students to pay tuition in two 
installments, paying one half with the regis- 
tration form and the balance before the end 
of the first week of the term. All students 
who have not completed tuition payments 
by the end of the first week of the term will 
be assessed the late payment fee. 

Students are responsible for payment of 
tuition to the university, even though they 
may be eligible for their employer's tuition 
reimbursement plan. Students are responsi- 
ble for making their own arrangements 
with their employers for reimbursement. 

The university withholds the giving of 
grades, the awarding of diplomas, the 
issuance of transcripts and the granting of 
honorable dismissal to any student whose 
account is in arrears. The university accepts 
MasterCard and VISA. 

Withdrawal 

A student may withdraw from a course 
up through the seventh week of the trimes- 
ter without a notation on the transcript. 
After the seventh week withdrawal from a 
course may be granted only by the instruc- 
tor, and a " W" would be recorded on the 
student's transcript at the end of the term 
when grades are recorded. 

To be eligible for a cancellation or refund 
of tuition charges, students must formally 
notify the Registrar of their intention to 
withdraw by completing the university 
withdrawal form and submitting it to the 
Registrar by mail or in person. The date of 



the postmark on the mailed withdrawal 
forms, or the date of submission on those 
brought in person, determines the amount 
of the refund, if any, due the student. 

Refunds 

The refund policy for graduate students 
who withdraw from any course or from any 
program (with the exception of the Execu- 
tive M.B.A. and the Human Nutrition 
programs) is as follows: 100 percent cancel- 
lation of tuition upon formal withdrawal 
prior to the first regularly scheduled class 
meeting, 80 percent cancellation of tuition 
upon formal withdrawal prior to the second 
regularly scheduled class meeting, 60 
percent cancellation of tuition upon formal 
withdrawal prior to the third regularly 
scheduled class meeting, 40 percent cancel- 
lation of tuition upon formal withdrawal 
prior to the fourth regularly scheduled class 
meeting, 20 percent cancellation of tuition 
upon formal withdrawal prior to the fifth 
regularly scheduled class meeting. No 
cancellation will be made after the fifth 
regularly scheduled class meeting. Any 
credit balance will be refunded upon 
request. 

The refund policy for the Executive 
M.B.A. program is as follows: For E. M.B.A. 
students who withdraw after completion of 
one module or less, one-half of the year's 
tuition will be cancelled. 

Information regarding the refund policy 
for the Human Nutrition program is 
available from the Student Records Office. 

Financial Aid 

The University of New Haven offers a 
comprehensive program of financial 
assistance to qualified students including 
assistantships, fellowships and student 
loans. Application procedures for financial 
assistance are detailed below. Applications 
are available from the Financial Aid Office. 

Need-based financial aid programs are 
available to matriculated students who are 
U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens who are 
enrolled on at least a half-time basis. Merit- 



based programs are open to all matriculated 
students. 

Need-Based Programs (U.S. citizens and 
eligible non-citizens only) 

• Federal Stafford Loans — The Federal 
Stafford Loans are need-based loans. 
Eligible students may borrow up to 
$8,500 per academic year. The interest 
rate for new borrowers is variable and is 
based on the 91-day T-Bill rate plus 3.1 
percent, with a cap of 8.25 percent. (The 
interest rate for 1996-97 at press time 
was 7.66 percent). Borrowers with 
previous outstanding Stafford Loans 
will continue to borrow at the same 
interest rate as their outstanding 
Stafford Loans. The interest is federally 
subsidized. Repayment begins 6 months 
after graduation or withdrawal from the 
university. Entrance and exit interviews 
must be conducted with all borrowers in 
the Federal Stafford Loan program. 
Entrance interviews will be conducted in 
person prior to the student's receipt of 
funds from the first loan disbursement. 
Exit interviews must be conducted prior 
to a student's graduation or withdrawal. 

Non-Need-Based Programs (U.S. citizens 
and eligible non-citizens only) 

• Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans — 

A new loan program created by the 
Higher Education Amendments of 1992 
for students who do not qualify, in 
whole or in part, for subsidized Federal 
Stafford Loans. The terms for 
unsubsidized loans are the same as the 
terms for subsidized Stafford Loans 
except for the following: 
— Interest accrues while the student is 
in school and during periods of 
deferment. The federal government 
does not pay the interest. The student 
can make monthly or quarterly 
payments to the lender, or the student 
and the lender may agree to add the 
interest to the principal of the loan 
(capitalization). 

Note: A student must submit a complete 
financial aid application and be considered 



Tuition, Fees and Financial Aid 33 

for a subsidized Federal Stafford Loan 
before the Financial Aid Office can process 
an Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan. 

Merit-Based Programs (Open to all 
matriculated students) 

• Assistantships — Assistantships are 
competitive appointments available to 
full-time students. Graduate assistants 
may work up to 20 hours per week and 
receive an hourly compensation as well 
as partial tuition support. Applications 
for assistantships are made in early 
spring for the following year. Applica- 
tions and further information are 
available from the Graduate School. 
Appointments are made for the aca- 
demic year starting in September. 

• Fellowships — Fellowships are competi- 
tive awards made to returning students 
on the basis of outstanding academic 
achievement. Recommendations for 
fellowships are solicited annually and 
nominations are sought from the faculty. 
Students may nominate themselves by 
writing to the Dean of Graduate Studies. 
Awards are made by a faculty committee 
for the academic year starting in Sep- 
tember. (No financial aid application is 
required). 

Application Procedure 

Students applying for need-based and 
non-need-based assistance must submit the 
documents listed below by the following 
deadlines: 

May 1 for the Fall trimester /academic 
year 

October 15 for the Winter trimester 

January 15 for the Spring trimester 

Note: International students who are 
applying for Graduate Assistantships need 
to complete only the UNH Non-Need- 
Based Financial Aid Application. This form 
is available from the Financial Aid Office. 

• University of New Haven Financial 
Aid Application — This application form 
must be completed fully and submitted 
to the University's Financial Aid Office. 



34 

• Free Application for Federal Student 

Aid (FAFSA) — This form is required to 
apply for financial aid from federal 
student financial aid programs. The 
UNH code number is 001397. Approxi- 
mately four weeks after the form is 
mailed, the U.S. Department of Educa- 
tion will send a Student Aid Report 
(SAR) to the applicant. 

• Tax Documentation — Applicants are 
required to submit a signed copy of their 
own (and of their spouse's, if applicable) 
complete federal income tax return from 
the most recent tax year prior to the 
academic year for which they are 
applying for aid. Tax forms must include 
all pertinent schedules and W-2 forms. 

• Financial Aid Transcript (mid-year 
applicants only) — Students must submit 
a Financial Aid Transcript Form from the 
college they attended previously during 
the academic year for which they are 
applying for financial aid. 

• Additional Information — Other forms 
and documents may be requested from 
you as your aid application is reviewed. 

Refund Policy for Federal Loans 

Students who withdraw from courses 
prior to the end of the fifth week of the 
trimester may be entitled to a full or partial 
refund of tuition charges. In the event that a 
student receiving a refund has received 
federal student aid, including a Federal 
Subsidized Stafford Student Loan and /or 
Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Student 
Loan, the student should contact the 
Financial Aid Office to obtain information 
on the federal refund policy. 

External Assistance Programs 

• Family Education Loan Program 
(FELP) — FELP is a low-interest loan 
program administered by the Connecti- 
cut Higher Education Supplemental 
Loan Authority (CHESLA). Students 
must be enrolled at least half-time and 
may borrow from $2,000 - $20,000 per 
academic year at a fixed annual rate. 



Repayment can be up to 140 months 
with the option of paying interest only 
while in school. Applicants must be 
credit-worthy. For an application and 
further information call 1-800-252- FELP 
(in Connecticut) or (860) 522-0766. 

• People's Bank/University of New 

Haven Special Tuition Account — Under 
this program students establish a line of 
credit with People's Bank. Once ap- 
proved, the account number may be 
used for payment of direct UNH 
charges. The minimum credit line that 
may be requested is $500. The university 
subsidizes 7 percent of the annual 
percentage rate of 15 percent; thus, the 
student's interest rate is 8 percent. 
Applications are available from the 
Financial Aid Office, the Business Office 
or the Graduate Offices. 

Cooperative Education 

Cooperative education programs at the 
University of New Haven provide an 
opportunity for students with little or no 
previous work experience to combine or 
alternate periods of career-oriented, tempo- 
rary work assignments with their academic 
programs. 

Co-op work assignments for graduate 
students are developed on an individual 
basis. This enables students to integrate the 
experiential learning of the workplace with 
the theoretical work of the classroom. 

Resume writing assistance and inter- 
viewing information are available in prepa- 
ration for co-op program participation. 

Co-op employers include large corpora- 
tions, small businesses, government agen- 
cies and nonprofit organizations. 

Graduate students become eligible to 
participate in the co-op program after 
completion of nine credit hours of graduate 
study. Certain additional requirements must 
also be met for eligibility for cooperative 
education. Information is available from the 
Co-op Office located in the Student Center. 



STUDENT AND 
ACADEMIC SERVICES 



Academic Services 



Bureau for Business Research 

The Bureau for Business Research offers 
access to databases for research on prod- 
ucts, markets, competition and international 
issues. In addition, the university's bian- 
nual, refereed academic journal, the Ameri- 
can Business Review, is published under the 
auspices of the bureau. 

Campus Copy, Inc. 

Campus Copy is a full service copy, type 
and print shop located in the basement of 
Maxcy Hall on the main campus. Campus 
Copy offers a variety of services at reason- 
able prices including: resume composition, 
word processing, desktop publishing, 
photocopying, full-color copying, scanning, 
notary service, faxing and binding. Cam- 
pus Copy, Inc. is independently owned and 
operated. For more information, call (203) 
931-9844. 

Campus Store 

The Campus Store provides all necessary 
texts, new and used, that are required for 
courses at the university. It also carries 
related supplies, software, greeting cards, 
imprinted clothing, gifts, candy and a 
selection of paperbacks, newspapers and 
periodicals. The Campus Store handles 



orders for class rings and school chairs. 
Film processing service is also provided for 
the campus community. Used text books 
may be sold back to the store throughout 
the year. The bookstore staff will place 
special orders for single copies of any book 
published in the United States. 

Students taking classes at the Southeast- 
ern (Groton/New London) site may pur- 
chase their books at that location. The 
bookstore will ship books and other items 
to any home or business address. Special 
educational discounts on computer soft- 
ware are available to faculty and students 
who have a current UNH Campus Card 
identification. A computer software catalog 
is available by calling (203) 933-4000. 

Center for Dispute Resolution 

The Center for Dispute Resolution has 
available a staff of distinguished profession- 
als who offer mediation services to indi- 
viduals and groups in schools, corporations, 
agencies and other organizations. The staff 
also offers training workshops and semi- 
nars in negotiation and mediation for 
business managers, students and educators 
to develop basic and advanced skills in 
interpersonal and intergroup conflict 
resolution. The Center for Dispute Resolu- 
tion serves as a resource center for written 
materials, research reports and videotapes 
demonstrating skills and processes in- 
volved in successful conflict resolution. 



36 

Center for Learning Resources 

The Center for Learning Resources (CLR) 
provides tutoring services to all UNH 
students in its Writing Lab. All of the tutors 
are instructors who are professionals in their 
fields and who are committed to the learning 
process. The Writing Lab has drop-in hours 
both days and evenings, plus some sched- 
uled appointments on Monday through 
Friday during the undergraduate academic 
semesters. The CLR serves as a resource and 
referral site for students needing tutoring 
assistance. 

Computer Services 

The Information Services Department 
provides for the computing needs of both the 
administrative and academic users at the 
university. Information Services supports 
standard word processing, spreadsheet, 
database management and statistical pack- 
ages. Most computer laboratories have 
student lab aides who assist in the lab's 
operation and are available to answer 
questions. 

The University of New Haven currently 
supports nineteen computing facilities. The 
primary, general-purpose computer lab is on 
the first floor of Echliri HaU. This facility 
contains PCs with all the university's stan- 
dard software plus PCs dedicated to pro- 
gramming languages such as Pascal, BASIC, 
C, C++. In addition to the general-purpose 
lab, an Internet lab in Room 115 of Echlin 
Hall contains PCs with Internet connectivity 
allowing for E-mail, FTP and World Wide 
Web protocols. 

Sixteen special-purpose computing 
facilities are available at other locations on 
the main campus. They are as follows: the 
CAEC lab in Buckman 225, the graphics art 
lab in Dodds 413, the Industrial Engineering 
CAD/CAM lab in Buckman 129, the Center 
for Learning Resources (CLR) lab in Maxcy 
106, the CLR classroom in Maxcy 127, the 
Computer Science AT&T lab in Echlin 206, 
the AT&T multimedia lab in Buckman 227, 
the Electrical Engineering lab in Buckman 
203, the CIS lab in Dodds 306, the Education 



Department lab on the second floor of South 
Campus Hall, the Mechanical Engineering 
Instrumentation Lab in Buckman 223, the 
Physics Department lab in Maxcy 216, the 
HRTDA lab in Harugari 114, the School of 
Business lab in Dodds B103, a faculty lab in 
Echlin 119, and the UNH Southeastern lab at 
New London. 

Finally, Room 129 in Maxcy Hall is a 
classroom designated for computer instruc- 
tion. When members of the facult)' are not 
using Room 129 for classes. Information 
Services schedules open labs for general- 
purpose use. The hours for open labs change 
each semester; hours are posted on the door 
of the lab, or may be obtained by calling (203) 
932-7062. 

Library 

The Marvin K. Peterson Library, named 
in honor of a former university president, 
opened in 1974. It includes three floors of 
reading space, stacks and reference areas. 
Information is made accessible through 
manual as well as electronic retrieval 
methods. Materials are stored in a variety of 
formats including print, audio, video, 
microform and CD-ROM disks. UNH has a 
strong CD-ROM collection for accessing 
materials published in all subjects, includ- 
ing ABI/INFORM, Academic Index, 
PsycLit, Compendex, GPO on Silverplatter, 
Newspaper Abstracts OnDisc, Dissertation 
Abstracts OnDisc, the National Trade Data 
Bank, Census of Population and Housing, 
Toxic Chemical Release Inventory and 
County Business Patterns. Additional 
resources are accessed in online databases 
such as OCLC, DIALOG, Dow Jones News/ 
Retrieval, FirstSearch, LEXIS/NEXIS and 
CCH Online. 

The UNH library holdings include 
approximately 300,000 volumes on the main 
campus, plus collections in off-campus 
centers. The library subscribes to hundreds 
of journals and uses telefacsimile to 
transmit articles and information between 
its own and other libraries across the 
country. 

The main library is a U.S. government 
documents depository library and selects 



approximately one third of the U.S. govern- 
ment yearly output to support many UNH 
programs. 

UNH students may borrow materials 
from Albertus Magnus College and also 
from Connecticut public libraries. As a 
member of OCLC, UNH has access through 
interlibrary loan to the holdings of more 
than 6,500 member libraries' over 23 million 
records. UNH is also a member of reQuest, 
the CD-ROM system of Connecticut librar- 
ies' holdings. 

At the Southeastern Connecticut loca- 
tion, the UNH library center is housed in 
the full-service Mitchell College Library. 
This unique arrangement provides materi- 
als from the library plus a UNH collection 
of 3,200 monographs, 125 journals and 
reference materials geared specifically for 
the UNH curriculum. UNH students have 
access to CD-ROM products and online 
services. 

Students are assisted by professional 
reference librarians. Subject-specific orienta- 
tion sessions are available to all students, 
including graduate students. Bibliographic 
instruction courses, geared to international 
students, are also provided. 

Library guides, as well as selected 
instructional support resource materials, are 
furnished; and a reserve collection is in 
place to support courses taught at UNH. 

Students enrolled as UNH doctoral 
students and working on dissertations are 
provided with access to Yale University's 
library system, which is one of the nation's 
finest. Graduate students are expected to 
utilize resources of the University of New 
Haven's library and its collection at the 
main campus in West Haven for their 
research and thesis preparation. 

UNH Foundation 

The role of the University of New Haven 
Foundation is to initiate, facilitate and 
participate in programs and projects aimed 
at furthering and improving the educa- 
tional, scientific and research endeavors at 
the university. 



Student and Academic Services 37 

The entities which are administered 
under the auspices of the UNH Foundation 
are: The Center for Family Business, The 
Institute for Analytical and Environmental 
Chemistry, the Institute for Progressive 
Business Management and the University of 
New Haven Press. 

The University of New Haven Press 
publishes scholarly texts, monographs and 
academic publications in a variety of fields 
including arts and sciences, business, 
criminal justice, public safety and sports. 
The press is launching a new publication. 
The International Sports Journal. 

Center for Family Business 

The mission of the Center for Family 
Business, which was founded in 1994, is to 
strengthen family firms as the backbone of 
Connecticut's economy and principal hope 
for economic revival in the region. The 
University of New Haven has as its busi- 
ness partners in this endeavor the account- 
ing and management consulting firm of 
Coopers & Lybrand; Fleet Bank, a subsid- 
iary of Fleet Financial Group; Massachusetts 
Mutual, one of the nation's largest life 
insurance and financial management 
companies; and Wiggin & Dana, a leading 
Connecticut law firm. 

The Center for Family Business will 
provide access to a national family business 
network and to business programs and 
services, consultations and seminars. 

Institute of Analytical and 
Environmental Chemistry 

The University of New Haven Institute 
of Analytical and Environmental Chemistry 
is an applied research facility with capabili- 
ties in three general areas of chemical and 
environmental analysis: sample analysis, 
property measurement and custom synthe- 
sis. Administered by the nonprofit UNH 
Foundation and headquartered in the 
university's School of Engineering, the 
institute is a state-certified laboratory for 
the analysis of various water pollutants. In 
addition, it is equipped to measure the 
physical properties, stability and environ- 



38 



mental impact of specific pollutants. The 
institute also has the capability to synthesize 
compounds, suspected pollutants and 
products to establish identification standards. 
The institute is geared to accept specific 
projects, under contract, and perform the 
necessary research on a confidential basis 
using UNH equipment, laboratory facilities 
and staff. Clients most likely to seek these 
services include chemical companies, 
consulting firms, regulatory agencies and 
municipalities. 

University of New Haven 
Press/Academic Publications 

The University of New Haven Press 
publishes scholarly texts, monographs and 
academic publications in a variety of fields 
including arts & sciences, business, criminal 
justice, public safety and sports. A new 
publication launched in 1997 is The Interna- 
tional Sports Journal. 

Under the auspices of the Bureau of 
Business Research, UNH Press publishes 
the American Business Review, a biannual, 
refereed academic journal. Information 
regarding subscriptions and submission of 
manuscripts may be obtained from the 
Bureau of Business Research at the School 
of Business. 

The University of New Haven also 
publishes Essays in Arts and Sciences, an 
interdisciplinary scholarly journal devoted 
to a broad range of interests including 
literature, the arts, the social sciences and 
the natural sciences. The journal has been 
published annually since 1971, with occa- 
sional additional issues on special topics. 
The journal's distribution includes approxi- 
mately 200 cooperating college and univer- 
sity libraries. 

Center for the Study of Crime 
Victim's Rights, Remedies and 
Resources 

The UNH Center for the Study of Victims' 
Rights, Remedies and Resources is main- 
tained under the auspices of the School of 
Public Safety and Professional Studies. This 



center will provide, and is in the process of 
developing, numerous initiatives to enhance 
the knowledge base regarding crime victim 
rights and services to assist crime victims 
through educational, training and technical 
assistance opportunities for the various 
academic disciplines and professional groups 
that study, advocate for or serve victims. 
These programs and services will be state- 
wide, regional and national in scope. They 
will include instructional programs; field and 
program evaluation research services; 
internships, fellowships and visiting scholar 
programs; legal, legislative and public policy 
analysis and advocacy; and publications, 
conferences and symposia. Information is 
available through the director's office at the 
university. 

Student Services 



Athletics 

Graduate students are encouraged to 
make use of the North Campus athletic 
complex. Facilities include two basketball 
courts, racquetball court, fitness center, six 
tennis courts, a softball field, Vieira Baseball 
Field and Dodds Stadium. 

Graduate students are eligible to take 
part in the intramural competitions in touch 
football, table tennis, basketball, racquet- 
ball, Softball, tennis and volleyball. 

A student ID card must be presented for 
admittance to the gymnasium building/ 
facilities after 5 p.m. on weekdays and at aU 
times on weekends. 

Campus Police Office 

The staff of the Campus Police Office are 
certified police officers who undergo 
continuous training and who have been 
trained in emergency medical procedures, 
first aid and CPR. They conduct regularly 
scheduled campus patrols and work closely 
with local, state and federal agencies to 
enforce the laws of the State of Connecticut, 
especially those most pertinent to campus 
safety and security. The Campus Police 
Office is fully staffed 24 hours /day. 



Career Development 

The Career Development Office offers 
individual and group career counseling as 
well as special workshops on resume 
preparation, interviewing skills and job 
research techniques. 

Although this office is not an employ- 
ment service and does not guarantee jobs, 
extensive listings of both full-time and part- 
time positions are maintained to provide a 
common meeting ground for employers 
and prospective employees. Graduate 
students will find this useful in locating 
part-time and full-time jobs while in school, 
as well as for seeking employment follow- 
ing graduation. Alumni are also encouraged 
to use these services. 

Employers wishing to list positions may 
contact the office by telephone or in writing, 
giving a description of the position avail- 
able and other details. There is no place- 
ment fee charged for these services. 

Career Development also assists stu- 
dents with questions regarding alternative 
career paths and maintains an extensive 
research library of career information, 
vocational resources, brochures and annual 
reports of employers. 

The Career Development Office pro- 
duces the career development section for 
the alumni newsletter. Insight, and has a 
regular career section and calendar in The 
Charger Bulletin. Information on career 
development events, workshops, seminars, 
recruitment visits, employment outlook for 
graduates, job listings and job search hints 
are available in the Career Development 
Office located on the upper level of the 
Student Center. The office is open weekdays 
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

Counseling Center 

The Counseling Center in Sheffield Hall 
offers assistance and counseling to students 
with vocational and personal problems. 

The Counseling Center also offers 
testing, including admissions, vocational 
interest and personality testing. 

For students who do not know where to 
go for help with a problem, the Counseling 
Center serves as a resource for information 
and direction. 



Student and Academic Services 39 

Food Services 

The Student Center building houses a 
Cafe that features Hometown Cafe entrees. 
Stack's Deli sandwiches, Pete's Arena pizza 
and America's Antipasto salad bar. The 
Sports Spot, located on the main floor of the 
Student Center, features Nathan's Famous 
hot dogs, burgers and cheesesteaks. The 
Time Out convenience store offers a selec- 
tion of bottled beverages, snacks and 
sundries. 

Kaplan Hall of Graduate Studies is home 
to the Charger Express. This food service 
outlet is open from late afternoon through 
the early evening every weekday that 
Graduate School classes are in session. The 
Charger Express features a number of 
offerings such as gourmet coffees, cold soft 
drinks and juices, fresh bagels, sandwiches 
and snacks. 

Graduate students living off-campus as 
well as those living in the graduate suites in 
UNH on-campus housing may deposit 
funds in $50 increments into declining 
balance accounts to be used for the food 
service purchases. For information, contact 
the Food Service Office in the Student 
Center. 

Graduate Housing 

Graduate students who choose to live on 
campus are housed in Dunham Hall, a 
residence hall open 12 months of the year 
and designated as a 24-hour quiet building. 
This hall also houses a small number of 
undergraduate students who are particu- 
larly interested in a quiet living environ- 
ment. Graduate housing is awarded on a 
first-come, first-served basis. 

Each graduate suite contains either two 
or three single bedrooms with a shared 
common kitchen and full bathroom. Stu- 
dent rooms are furnished with a bed, desk, 
chair, dresser, telephone line and cable 
hookup. 

A residence application for graduate 
housing is sent to all admitted graduate 
students in the acceptance materials distrib- 
uted by the Graduate Admissions Office. 
Student interested in graduate housing in 



40 



the campus residence hall are encouraged 
to apply quickly upon receipt of their 
acceptance to the Graduate School. It is 
important that all graduate students under- 
stand that they are bound to a two-trimester 
commitment if they obtain graduate hous- 
ing on campus. The Office of Residential 
Life also maintains a listing of off-campus 
housing accommodations including apart- 
ments, houses and private rooms. 

Health Services 

The university's Health Services Center, 
located in Sheffield Hall on the main 
campus, is open to all students without 
charge. The center is staffed by two regis- 
tered nurses and two part-time physicians. 
A weekly women's clinic is staffed by nurse 
practitioners. Health Services provides 
initial care for minor illnesses and injuries 
as well as diagnosis, referral and follow-up 
care for more serious conditions. The center 
also is a resource for information about 
medical questions and other medical 
facilities in the community 

All students entering the university 
must comply with state laws regarding 
immunizations for measles and rubella. 
Applicants to the Graduate School must 
complete the Measles Immunization Form 
and return it to the UNH Health Services 
Office. In addition, students enrolling at 
UNH for full-time study must also file a 
completed Health Examination Report with 
the Health Services Office. Medical forms 
and information can be obtained by contact- 
ing the Health Services Office at (203) 932- 
7079 or 1-800-DIAL-UNH, Ext. 7079. 

It is the policy of the university to 
withhold registration at the beginning of 
each term for noncompliance. 

Services for Students with 
Disabilities 

The Disability Accommodation Services 
Office handles all referrals regarding any 
student with a disability, whether tempo- 
rary or permanent. The director provides 
guidance, assistance and information for 
students with disabilities and oversees the 



university's compliance with Section 504 of 
the H.E.W. Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the 
Americans with Disabilities Act and other 
governmental regulations. 

Referrals and inquiries concerning any 
matters relating to students with disabili- 
ties, accessible facilities and /or reasonable 
accommodations should be directed to this 
office. In order to receive accommodations 
for a disability, students with disabilities 
must initiate a request for services. It is the 
responsibility of the student to make his/ 
her needs known by self-identifying as a 
student with a disability. In order to do so, 
students with disabilities should contact the 
Director of the Disability Accommodation 
Services Office and should submit the 
required documentation of the disability. 
These records are considered confidential 
and are maintained in the Disability Accom- 
modation Services Office, separate from 
other school records. Documentation 
should not be submitted with your applica- 
tion for admission. 

The Disability Accommodation Services 
Office is located on the ground level of 
Sheffield Hall, and the Director can be 
reached by voice/TDD at (203) 932-7331. 

Dental Center 

The UNH Dental Hygiene Clinic offers 
access to appointments for preventive 
services, including tooth cleaning and 
polishing, to members of the university 
community and to external clients. Students 
in the final phases of their practical training 
in the university's undergraduate dental 
hygiene program clean teeth, take dental x- 
rays, administer fluoride treatments and 
provide oral hygiene instruction. Fees are 
charged on a sliding scale, according to the 
client's UNH employee /student status 
and /or ability to pay. For more information 
or to schedule an appointment, call (203) 
931-6028. 

International Student Services 

Each year the University of New Haven 
admits students from many nations. These 
students, representing more than 50 differ- 



ent countries, bring an international and 
intercultural dimension to the campus. 

The International Services Office pro- 
vides for the special needs and concerns of 
all international students. The office staff 
assists students with government regula- 
tions, provides information on travel to the 
United States and advises students on 
academic, social and cultural adjustment. 
The office also serves as a liaison between 
the student and the university community. 

A wide range of programs has been 
developed including publication of an 
international newsletter, special orientation 
events, an international festival and 
information seminars. 

Multicultural Affairs and 
Services 

The staff of the Office of Multicultural 
Affairs and Services works cooperatively 
with the campus community to assist and 
support students of color. The mission of 
the staff is to serve minority students by 
developing cultural and cross-cultural 
programs, workshops and lectures as well 
as providing supplemental counseling for 
social, personal and academic needs. 

It is a goal of this department to enrich 
the educational experience of minority 
students by encouraging utilization of the 
facilities and programs at the university and 
in the Greater New Haven area. In addi- 
tion, the staff is dedicated to enhancing 
awareness of and sensitivity toward the 
needs of the minority student population. 

Veteran's Affairs 

The university registrar, a full-time 
administrator in the Student Records Office, 
handles support services for veterans 
attending the University of New Haven. 
Liaison with state and local veteran's 
organizations is maintained on a regular 
basis. 

Alumni Relations 

Students are eligible for membership in 
the Alumni Association immediately upon 



Student and Academic Services 41 

graduation. Non-degreed students are 
eligible for membership upon completion of 
12 graduate credit hours or 27 undergradu- 
ate credit hours. There are currently more 
than 30,000 eligible alumni. 

Alumni Association members enjoy 
special privileges such as use of the library. 
Career Development services and special 
rates to audit classes. Permanent lifetime 
membership ID cards are issued to Alumni 
Association members soon after graduation. 

Insight, the alumni magazine, is mailed 
to all members regularly. Homecoming, 
class reunions, an annual Scholarship Ball, 
estate planning seminars plus other educa- 
tional and social events offer opportunities 
for continued contact with UNH and fellow 
UNH alumni. 

Multiple regional alumni clubs which 
span the nation offer additional opportuni- 
ties for active involvement. Alumni clubs 
sponsor social and career networking 
receptions, seminars, family-oriented 
events, fund raising and sporting activities. 

Alumni board members govern the 
association with the assistance of additional 
alumni volunteers. The board serves as an 
advisory group to the university, working 
to strengthen bonds by promoting commu- 
nication between alumni and the UNH 
community. 

A major thrust of the Alumni Board of 
Directors is to foster a joint relationship 
between students and alumni. Alumni 
career panel sessions provide awareness of 
the valuable role alumni play in students' 
lives today and in their careers for the 
future. 

Development Office 

The development staff works with the 
president of the university, the Board of 
Governors, faculty and staff to secure both 
short- and long-term funding for enhance- 
ment of the university's programs and 
facilities. Funds are sought for construction, 
student financial aid, faculty development, 
equipment, library resources and other 
institutional opportunities for growth over 
and above what can be achieved from 
regular and anticipated university income. 



42 



National and local foundations, corpora- 
tions, parents, students, alumni, faculty and 
friends support these efforts and contribute 
to the excellence of the university. Students 
can play an active role, participating in 
fund-raising events and soliciting donations 
for the annual alumni fund. 

Student Organizations 

Graduate Student Council 

The Graduate Student Council of the 
University of New Haven was founded in 
1976. Since that time it has expanded its 
horizons through diverse programming and 
as a result of the increased enrollment of 
graduate students. 

The Graduate Student Council is a 
student organization funded by the fee paid 
by all graduate students each trimester. 
Thus, all graduate students enrolled at 
UNH are automatically members and share 
in the activities of the council. 

The purpose of the Graduate Student 
Council is to promote the welfare of the 
student body of the Graduate School, to 
give counsel and encouragement to all 
students in the Graduate School, to encour- 
age the active participation of all graduate 
students in determination of their academic 
environment, to develop and encourage a 
school spirit among the graduate student 
body through social and other activities, 
and to convey student opinion to the 
university administration. The Graduate 
Student Council annually elects one of its 
members to serve as a delegate to the 
university's Board of Governors. 

The council serves as a cultural, social 
and educational organization through a 
variety of activities including the biannual 
receptions for graduating students, a class 
gift to the university each year and other 
supportive services. 

Black Graduate Association 

Founded in 1993, the Black Graduate 
Association provides a cultural, academic 



and social environment within which 
graduate students and alumni/ae of African 
descent may interact, network and associ- 
ate. A major interest of the BGA is develop- 
ment of scholarship support for graduate 
study. Meetings and events are held eve- 
nings and weekends to accommodate 
working students. Membership is open to 
current graduate students and alumni/ae of 
the Graduate School. 

NAGPS Affiliation 

The Graduate School is an affiliate of the 
National Association of Graduate-Profes- 
sional Students. NAGPS is a nonprofit 
organization dedicated to improving the 
quality of graduate and professional 
student life in the U.S. NAGPS works to 
actively promote the interests and welfare 
of graduate students and graduate educa- 
tion at local, regional and national levels. 

Information is available at their web site 
about current lobbying efforts in the U.S. 
Congress on issues affecting financial aid, 
student loans and taxation of tuition 
benefits, etc. NAGPS also operates a 
NAGPS Job Bank in a special section of the 
web site. Graduate students enrolled at 
UNH are eligible to obtain access to the Job 
Bank, as well as the fellowship /Scholarship 
and Grants databank. The NAGPS web site 
is www.nagps.org/NAGPS/ 

Alpha Epsilon Lambda 

At press time, the Graduate School is in 
the process of establishing a UNH chapter 
of Alpha Epsilon Lambda, the honor society 
of graduate and professional school stu- 
dents. Founded in 1990 by former officers 
of the National Association of Graduate- 
Professional Students, it is the first and only 
academic honor society organized to 
recognize excellence among graduate and 
professional students, regardless of aca- 
demic discipline. The University of New 
Haven Graduate School holds affiliate 
membership in the National Association of 
Graduate-Professional Students, Inc. 

The mission of Alpha Epsilon Lambda is 
to confer distinction for high achievement, 
promote leadership development, promote 



scholarship and encourage intellectual 
development, enrich the intellectual envi- 
ronment of graduate education institutions 
and encourage high standards of ethical 
behavior. 

Alpha Epsilon Lambda chapters may be 
installed at colleges or universities which 
grant advanced degrees and support the 
stated mission of AEL. Graduate and 
professional students who meet the aca- 
demic and leadership qualifications may be 
elected to membership. 

Lambda Pi Eta 

The Beta Kappa Chapter of Lambda Pi 
Eta is the university's affiliate of the na- 
tional honor society in communication. 
Founded in 1985, the chapter became an 
affiliate of the National Communication 
Association in 1994. The name represents 
what Aristotle described in his Rhetoric as 
the three modes of persuasion: logos, 
meaning logic; pathos, relating to emotion; 
and ethos, defined as character credibility 
and ethics. Lambda Pi Eta's purpose is to 
recognize, foster and reward outstanding 
scholastic achievement; stimulate interest in 
the field of communication; and provide 
opportunities for dialogue among 
facultyand students interested in communi- 
cation. 



Psi Chi 

The Department of Psychology at UNH 
supports a chapter of Psi Chi, the National 
Honor Society in Psychology. Founded on 
the UNH campus in 1976, the chapter is one 
of over 700 chapters. This honorary society 
was founded at the Ninth International 
Congress of Psychology at Yale University 
in 1929. Psychology program students are 
elected to Psi Chi to honor achievement in 
their chosen field. 

Sigma Beta Delta 

Sigma Beta Delta is a national honor 
society in business, management and 
administration. The UNH School of Busi- 
ness chapter of Sigma Beta Delta was 



Student and Academic Services 43 

inaugurated in May of 1994, with 19 UNH 
faculty inducted as charter members. At its 
first ceremony, 65 graduate and under- 
graduate students were honored with 
initiation. 

Student Publications 

Student publications include The Charger 
Bulletin, the university student newspaper, 
and The Chariot, the annual yearbook. 
Published under the auspices of the English 
Department, The Elm City Review is a 
student literary publication that provides an 
audience for creative writing selected from 
students' submissions of prose fiction and 
nonfiction as well as poetry. Students may 
volunteer to work on these student publica- 
tions. 

WNHU Radio 

WNHU, the university's student- 
operated FM stereo broadcast facility, is 
operated by the Communication Depart- 
ment of the School of Business throughout 
the year on a frequency of 88.7 MHz at a 
power of 1,700 watts. This extracurricular 
enterprise, open to all undergraduate and 
graduate students, has a 30-mile radius 
which serves southern Connecticut and 
eastern Long Island with music, news, 
sports and weather. The WNHU broadcast 
day consists of a variety of different types of 
music played from 6 a.m. to 2 a.m., seven 
days a week, every day of the year! 

Most WNHU activities in programming, 
business and engineering operations are 
performzed by students in the university's 
day, evening and graduate divisions. The 
station personnel will train all qualified stu- 
dents in their respective areas of interest; no 
prior radio experience is necessary. 



44 



ACADEMIC 
PROGRAMS 



Accounting 



Coordinator: Robert G. McDonald, 
Associate Professor of Accounting, 
M.B.A., New York University; CMA, 
CIA, CFA, CPA 

The MS accounting program is for those 
students who are reasonably certain that 
accounting is their career choice. The MS 
accounting program will focus on critical 
accounting skills and knowledge, and will 
provide a foundation for a successful career 
in accounting. Accounting practitioners 
already in the field, as well as individuals 
planning a career change to the accounting 
profession, are welcome in the program. 
Students with a minimal number of under- 
graduate accounting courses may be required 
to take selected undergraduate courses. 

The accounting department strongly 
recommends that MS accounting students 
plan early in their studies to achieve an 
accounting or finance professional certifica- 
tion. The available accounting certifications 
are: Certified Public Accountant (CPA) for a 
career in public accounting; Certified 
Management Accountant (CMA) for a 
career in management accounting; Certified 
Internal Auditor (CIA) for a career in 
internal auditing; and the new Certified in 
Financial Management (CFM) for a career in 
accounting and finance. See the Finance 
programs for finance certifications. The MS 
Accounting program has foundation and 



core courses that provide basic knowledge 
for these certifications. Within the elective 
courses, students can then specialize for 
whichever certification and /or career path 
they prefer. 

Each student, upon entering the pro- 
gram, will be assigned a faculty adviser 
who will assist the student throughout the 
program of study, particularly with the 
selection of suitable electives. The assigned 
faculty adviser will also act as, or assist in 
the selection of, the student's research 
project or thesis adviser. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission to the pro- 
gram are expected to hold an undergradu- 
ate degree from an accredited institution, 
preferably, but not exclusively, in account- 
ing or in business administration with a 
major in accounting. Persons holding other 
than the above degrees will be required to 
take a number of selected undergraduate 
courses. Admission is based primarily on an 
applicant's undergraduate record; however, 
the promise of academic success is the 
essential factor for admission. In support of 
their applications, persons may submit their 
scores from the Graduate Management 
Admission Test (GMAT). An applicant may 
be required to take this test. 

M.S., Accounting 

A total of 42 credits on the graduate level 
is required for the master of science in 
accounting. In addition, selected under- 
graduate courses in accounting may be 



46 

required of students not holding an under- 
graduate degree in accounting. Individual 
programs of study are determined after a 
conference with the coordinator. 

Students are advised to consult the 
coordinator as soon as possible after 
matriculating in the program. 

Thesis/Research Project/ 
Comprehensive Examination 
Requirement 

Within the elective portion of the pro- 
gram, students must choose from three 
alternatives for completion of the final six 
credits of coursework in the M.S. account- 
ing curriculum. Students may elect to take 
two approved accounting elective courses 
plus a comprehensive examination, or one 
approved accounting elective plus a three- 
credit research project course. Alternatively, 
they may choose the two-course, six-credit 
thesis option (A 698/699 Thesis I and II). 

If the thesis option is selected, the thesis 
must show ability to organize material in a 
clear and original manner and present well- 
reasoned conclusions. Thesis preparation 
and submission must comply with the 
Graduate School policy on theses as well as 
all specific department requirements. 

Required Courses 

Foundation Courses 

EC 601 Macroeconomics and 

Microeconomics 
EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 
FI 601 Finance 

Finance Elective (one course) 
MG 637 Management Process 
QA 604 Probability and Statistics 

Core Courses 

A 616 Taxation for Management 

A 642 Operational Auditing 

A 650 Advanced Accounting Theory* 

A 654 Financial Statements: Reporting and 

Analysis 
Electives (four courses) 
Total credits: 42 

*Prerequisite is A 630 or six credits of intermediate 
accounting. 



Elective Courses (Select any two courses 
from a specialization.) 

Financial Accounting Specialization 

A 651 Financial Accounting Seminar 

A 652 Advanced Auditing 

A 653 Accounting for the Not-for-Profit 

Organization 
Finance Elective (one course) 

Managerial Accounting Specialization 

A 641 Accounting Information Systems 
A 661 Managerial Accounting Seminar 
Finance Elective (one course) 

Taxation Specialization 

A 601 Individual Income Taxation 

A 602 Sales and Exchanges of Property 

A 604 Corporate Income Taxation I 

See page 107 for the graduate certificates 
in accounting. 

Business 
Administration (M.B.A.) 

Director: Omid Nodoushani, Associate 
Professor of Management, Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 

The recently revised M.B.A. curriculum 
is designed to prepare managers for today's 
increasingly complex and multidimensional 
work environment. It includes a strong 
focus on leadership, teamwork and integra- 
tive management activities. The program 
offers flexibility, providing choices within 
the advanced courses and a variety of 
functional concentrations with a broad 
selection of courses offered each trimester. 
In addition to the M.B.A. program, the 
University of New Haven also offers M.B.A. 
dual degree programs with industrial 
engineering (M.B.A. /M.S. I.E.) and public 
administration (M.B.A. /M. PA. ). Descrip- 
tions of the dual degree curricula begin on 
page 56. 

M.B.A. graduates need to be prepared 
for managing in an increasingly complex 
global business environment. In addition to 
traditional coverage of general manage- 
ment, students will find applications in a 



variety of specialized concentrations. Also, 
UNH graduate programs in disciplines such 
as engineering, computer and information 
sciences, health care administration, indus- 
trial relations, public administration and 
industrial / organizational psychology 
provide a mix of advanced electives suitable 
for M.B.A. students. 

Students with a recent degree in busi- 
ness may be able to complete the program 
with as few as 33 graduate credits, while 
other students may require the maximum 
51 credits. Because the UNH Graduate 
School operates on a trimester calendar 
with three full-length terms each year plus 
an abbreviated summer session, full-time 
students may complete their studies in 12 to 
22 months. 

Curriculum 

The M.B.A. curriculum is focused 
primarily on advanced topics; however, 
students without previous studies in 
business will complete a maximum of 18 
credits in introductory courses before 
proceeding to the 33 credits of advanced 
courses and electives. The program also 
stresses alternate approaches to studies in 
organizational communication, production, 
corporate valuation, and organizational 
change. 

Students may choose from a wide 
variety of alternatives for their advanced 
elective courses. Concentrations are offered 
in 17 different areas ranging from account- 
ing to technology management, and includ- 
ing new concentrations in sports manage- 
ment and in industrial engineering. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission to the MBA 
program are required to hold a four-year 
baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from 
an accredited institution. An undergradu- 
ate degree in business is not a requirement; 
qualified students from all backgrounds are 
encouraged to submit applications. Admis- 
sions decisions are based on a combination 
of a student's undergraduate academic 
performance, professional accomplishment, 
letters of recommendation and scores on the 
Graduate Management Admissions Test 



Academic Programs 47 

(GMAT). Of these, the greatest weight is 
given to undergraduate academic perfor- 
mance. If applicants are unable to submit a 
GMAT score before their desired start date, 
they may be admitted provisionally (based 
on prior academic and professional perfor- 
mance) for a maximum of two terms. 
Receipt of a GMAT score is required for full 
acceptance and continuation in the pro- 
gram. 

M. B. A. 

A total of 51 credits, with or without 
thesis, is required for completion of the 
M.B.A. program. Students will begin their 
studies with the six required Core Courses. 
Any of these six required Core Courses may 
be waived on the basis of the student's 
undergraduate coursework or previous 
graduate courses, if taken at a regionally 
accredited institution within the last seven 
years. Waiver guidelines for these six Core 
Courses are outlined on the next pages. 

Upon successful completion (or waiver) 
of the Core Courses, students proceed to the 
next level in the program: the seven Ad- 
vanced Courses plus the four elective, or 
concentration, courses. No waivers are 
permitted for the 33 credits of Advanced 
Courses plus electives; however, transfer 
credit(s) toward advanced courses and /or 
electives may be granted for graduate 
courses with a grade of "B" (3.0) or better if 
taken within the last four years at a region- 
ally accredited institution, subject to the 
transfer policies of the Graduate School. 
After admission, any graduate courses 
taken for transfer must have prior approval 
with a signed Coordinated Course Form. 

Completion of the elective portion of the 
program may be accomplished by selecting 
courses from a variety of areas ("general 
M.B.A."), at least two of which must be 
from departments within the School of 
Business. Another option provides the 
opportunity for the student to develop 
special skills by concentrating the elective 
portion of the program in a specific area of 
study. The concentration options are 
described in the pages immediately follow- 
ing this section. 



48 



In appropriate cases having special 
approval, a student may elect to write a 
thesis. Candidates for the M.B.A. electing to 
write a thesis must register for a minimum 
of six thesis credits in the appropriate 
business department and would substitute 
these six credits of Thesis I and II for two 
elective courses in the program. The thesis 
must show ability to organize material in a 
clear and original manner and must present 
well-reasoned conclusions. Thesis prepara- 
tion and submission must comply with the 
Graduate School policy on theses as well as 
all specific department requirements. 

In order to become fully matriculated in 
the M.B.A. program, students who are 
admitted provisionally must complete, with 
satisfactory grades as specified in the letter 
of acceptance, the following courses before 
enrolling in elective courses: QA 604 and 
any three other required Core Courses for 
which the prerequisites have been met. 
(Refer to the course descriptions elsewhere 
in this catalog for course prerequisites.) 

Required Courses 

Core Courses (18 credits; waivable) 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 
EC 601 Macroeconomics and 

Microeconomics 
FI 601 Finance 

MG 637 Management Process 
MK 609 Marketing 
QA 604 Probability and Statistics 

Advanced Courses (21 credits; not 
waivable)^ 

a. Communicating a Vision^ (choose one) 

CO 621 Managerial Communication 
MG 663 Leadership and Team Building 

b. Product Creation (choose one) 

MG 614 Decisions in Operations 

Management 
MK 643 Product Management 

c. Valuation and ControP(choose one) 

A 654 Financial Statements: Reporting 

and Analysis 
FI 602 Corporate Valuation and Business 

Strategy 



d. Global Issues^ (choose one) 

EC 641 International Economics 
IB 643 International Business 

e. Managing Change (choose one) 

MG 667 Multicultural Issues in the 

Workplace 
P 642 Organizational Change and 

Development 

f. Interaction with the External 

Environment 

EC 629 Business and Society 

g. Planning and Strategic Vision 

MG 669 Strategic Management 

Electives or Concentration (12 credits) 

Total credits: 51 

^Any course may be counted for credit only once; therefore, 
if a given course is listed both as an Advanced Course and 
as a concentration course, it may he counted as an 
Advanced Course or as a concentration course, but not 
both. 

'MG 663 is required for the Public Relations concentration. 

^FI 602 is required for the Finance concentration. 

*IB 643 is required for the International Business concen- 
tration'. 

Waiver Policy 

Any of the six required Core Courses 
may be waived on the basis of appropriate 
undergraduate or graduate courses taken 
within the last seven years at a regionally 
accredited institution. Waivers will be 
considered at the time of admission; waiv- 
ers based on a "B" (3.0) or better in the 
appropriate courses will be considered and 
granted. Students who seek additional 
waivers must submit a written request 
(with a course syllabus, preferably, or 
course description of the previously com- 
pleted coursework) to the M.B.A. director 
during the first semester of attendance. 
Normally, waivers are decided within the 
first semester of study. Only courses with 
grades of "B" or better may be used in 
meeting waiver guidelines for the re- 
quired courses. Only required Core 
Courses may be waived, 

A course that has been waived may not 



be taken for or used for elective credits. No 
tuition refund or cancellation will be issued 
for courses taken and subsequently waived. 

Waiver Guidelines 

The minimum course requirements, all 
taken within the last seven years, for 
waivers are: 

A 621: One course in financial accounting 
and one course in managerial accounting. 

EC 601: One course in macroeconomics and 
one course in microeconomics. 

FI 601: One upper division course in corpo- 
rate finance. 

MG 637: One upper division course in 
management or organizational behavior. 

MK 609: One upper division course in 
marketing. 

QA 604: Two courses in statistics, or one 
course in statistics and one course in quanti- 
tative business analysis. 



Concentrations 

Within the M.B.A. program students 
may use the elective credits to concentrate 
their studies in a specific area. It is recom- 
mended, but not required, that concentra- 
tions be indicated on the application for 
admission to the M.B.A. program, or as 
soon as possible thereafter. 

The M.B.A. concentrations and their 
course requirements are presented on the 
following pages. Concentrations consist of 
12 credits. In certain special circumstances, 
students may be allowed to substitute other 
appropriate courses for those listed as part 
of the concentration. Any course substitu- 
tion for a listed concentration course must 
be approved in writing by the student's 
concentration adviser prior to enrollment 
in the course. 

The courses listed for some concentra- 
tions include courses that also appear in the 
Advanced Courses. Students enrolled in a 



Academic Programs 49 

concentration who take any course(s) that 
are listed for that concentration to satisfy 
Advanced Course requirements may not 
count the same course credits toward the 
concentration credit requirement. Instead, 
the student will take other courses listed 
in the concentration to satisfy the required 
concentration credits. 

The concentrations in finance, interna- 
tional business and public relations have 
special requirements which affect the 
required portion of the curriculum. Stu- 
dents should consult the concentration 
descriptions and contact the appropriate 
adviser for additional information. 

Concentration in Accounting 

Concentration Adviser: Robert G. 
McDonald, Associate Professor of 
Accounting, M.B.A., New York 
University; CMA, CIA, CFA, CPA 

The concentration in the accounting 
program is recommended to those M.B.A. 
students who desire an accounting special- 
ization but do not have an undergraduate 
accounting degree. Students who wish to 
take the Certified Public Accounting 
examination or the Certified Management 
Accounting examination should enroll in 
the M.S. in accounting program. 

A 616 Taxation for Management 
A 650 Advanced Accounting Theory* 
A 661 Managerial Accounting Seminar 
Plus any accounting or taxation elective 
Total credits: 12 

*Prerequisite is A 630 or six credits of intermediate 
accounting. 

See page 107 for the graduate certificates 
in accounting. 

Concentration in Business 
Policy and Strategy 

Concentration Adviser: Omid Nodoushani, 
Associate Professor of Management, 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

The concentration in business policy and 
strategy is designed to prepare managers to 



50 



deal with the increasing emphasis given by 
companies to the development and imple- 
mentation of innovative global business 
strategies. The program focuses on strategic 
concepts and processes and relates them to 
general management and functional super- 
vision. A grounding in formulation of 
business policy and strategy for both 
internal growth and growth by mergers and 
acquisitions is provided. 

MG 650 Entrepreneurship 
MG 655 Corporate Governance and 
Business Strategy 

Plus two of the following: 

FI 630 Corporate Financial Analysis and 

Applications 
IB 652 Multinational Business Management 
MG 642 New Business Development From 

Technology 
MG 663 Leadership and Team Building {if 

not taken as Advanced Course) 
MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 
MG 685 Research Methods in Business 

Administration 
Total credits: 12 

Concentration in Computer 
and Information Science 

Concentration Adviser: Barun Chandra, 
Assistant Professor of Computer 
Science, Ph.D., University of Chicago 

This concentration provides coverage of 
programming and systems with a business 
orientation, preparing the student to carry 
out a range of computing projects and to 
interact knowledgeably with programmers 
and computer systems specialists. Students 
should check the prerequisite requirements 
in the Graduate Catalog course descriptions 
to assure that all prerequisites are met when 
selecting courses in this concentration. 

Option 1:* 

CS 603 Introduction to Programming/Pascal 
CS 605 Business Programming/COBOL 

Option 2:* 

CS 603 Introduction to Programming/ Pascal 

CS 620 Data Structures 



Option 3:* 

CS 610 Intermediate Programming/C 
CS 620 Data Structures 

Plus tiuo of the following: 

CS 616 Assembly Language 

CS 622 Database Systems 

CS 624 Software Engineering 

CS 640 Computer Organization 

CS 648 Computer Systems Analysis and 

Selection 
Total credits: 12 

*Options 1 and 2 may be selected by students who have no 
programming background; for selection of Option 3 it is 
expected that students have established programming skills. 



See page 109 for the certificate in com- 
puter and information science. 

Concentration in Finance 

Concentration Adviser: Robert M. Rainish, 
Professor of Finance, Ph.D., City 
University of New York 

The goal of the finance concentration is 
to provide individuals with advanced 
material in the areas of financial services 
and corporate finance. The courses stress 
the understanding and application of the 
conceptual foundations of finance and 
analytic finance techniques. Students 
interested in a career in finance should 
consult with the finance adviser as soon as 
possible. 

Within the required M.B.A. Advanced 
Courses, finance concentration students 
take FI 602 Corporate Valuation and Busi- 
ness Strategy in the Valuation and Control 
area. 

FI 605 Data Evaluation and Modeling 

FI 610 Capital Market Theory 

FI 620 Capital Markets and the Valuation of 

Fixed Income Securities 
FI 625 Advanced Capital Market Issues, or 
FI 635 Advanced Corporate Financial 

Management Issues 
Total credits: 12 



Students interested in preparing for/ 
enhancing a career in finance or in obtain- 
ing professional financial certification (CFA, 
CFM, CFP) should contact the finance 
program coordinator/ adviser at the begin- 
ning of their graduate studies to discuss the 
appropriate alternatives: an M.B.A. plus a 
Professional Graduate Certificate (see page 
110) or the M.S. degree in Finance and 
Financial Services (see page 79). 

Concentration in Health Care 
Management 

Concentration Adviser: Charles Coleman, 
Assistant Professor of Public 
Administration, M.P.A., West Virginia 
University 

The concentration in health care 
management is designed for those individu- 
als currently in or those who anticipate a 
career in health care management. Courses 
are designed to provide students with the 
conceptual and practical skills necessary for 
management of a health care organization. 

PA 651 Health Care Ethics 

Plus one of the following: 

MG 640 Management of Health Care 

Organizations 
PA 642 Health Care Delivery Systems 
PA 647 Alternative Health Care Delivery 

Systems 

PA 652 Introduction to Managed Care 
Plus two of the following: 

MG 630 Management Information Systems 

in Health Care 
PA 641 Financial Management of Health 

Care Organizations 
PA 643 Health and Institutional Planning 
PA 644 Administration of Programs and 

Services for the Aged 
PA 645 Health Care Economics and Finance 
PA 646 Organization and Management of 

Long-Term Care Facilities 
PA 648 Contemporary Issues in Health Care 
PA 649 History and Development of Health 

Care Institutions 



Academic Programs 51 

PA 653 Cost Containment in Health Care 

PA 657 Health Care Reimbursements 

PA 659 Human Resource Planning in Health 

Care 
PA 662 Recruitment and Retention of Health 

Care Professionals 
PA 664 Survey of Medical Group 

Management 
PA 670/671 Selected Topics* 
PS 635 Law and Public Health 
Total credits: 12 

*PA 670/671 Selected Topics may be taken more than once. 

See page 84 for the M.S. in Health Care 
Administration and page 112 for the certifi- 
cate in health care management. 

Concentration in Health Care 
Marketing 

Concentration Adviser: Charles Coleman, 
Assistant Professor of Public 
Administration, M.P.A., West Virginia 
University 

The concentration in health care market- 
ing is designed to provide students with the 
communications, marketing and public 
relations skills necessary to compete 
successfully as marketing professionals in a 
variety of health care environments. Stu- 
dents will be taught to identify and analyze 
variables which affect communication and 
public relations, to design health care 
marketing plans and to implement market- 
ing strategy in health care organizations. 

CO 623 Communication in Health Care 
MK 638 Competitive Marketing Strategy 
MK 641 Marketing Management 

Plus one of the following: 

CO 621 Managerial Communication 
CO 631 Public Information Dynamics 
CO 632 Contemporary Public Relations 

Issues 
Total credits: 12 

See page 84 for the M.S. degree program 
in Health Care Administration. 



52 



Concentration in Human 
Resources Management 

Concentration Adviser: Laurel R. Goulet, 
Assistant Professor of Management, 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

This concentration is designed for the 
human resource professional or the indi- 
vidual in another field who aspires to work 
in human resources. It provides an over- 
view of the field and an opportunity to 
study various subfunctions (such as train- 
ing, industrial relations or compensation) in 
greater depth. 

MG 645 Management of Human Resources 

Plus three of the following: 

EC 627 Economics of Labor Relations 

EC 687 Collective Bargaining 

MG 663 Leadership and Team Building {if 

not taken as Advanced Course) 
MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 
MG 665 Compensation Administration 
MG 667 Multicultural Issues in the 

Workplace 
MG 678 Personnel Management Seminar 
MG 679 Industrial Relations Seminar 
MG 685 Research Methods in Business 

Administration 
P 628 The Interview 

P 641 Personnel Development and Training 
Total credits: 12 

See page 113 for the certificate in human 
resources management. For information on 
other degree program choices related to this 
field, see the index under Human 
Resources, Industrial /Organizational 
Psychology and Industrial Relations. 

Concentration in Industrial 
Engineering 

Concentration Adviser: M. Ali Montazer, 
Professor of Industrial Engineering, 
Ph.D., State University of New York at 
Buffalo 

Industrial engineering deals with the 
design, evaluation and improvement of 



human/machine systems, processes and 
methods. Students may choose to concen- 
trate in either Track I or Track II, so long as 
course prerequisites are met. 

Track I: Operations and Processes 

This track provides the student with a 
common core of knowledge and skills in the 
areas of office and business operations, 
production and manufacturing engineering. 

IE 623 Decision Analysis 
IE 651 Human Engineering I 
IE 655 Manufacturing Analysis 
IE 686 Inventory Analysis 
Total credits: 12 

Track II: Quality and Reliability 

This track provides the student with the 
knowledge, tools and techniques that are the 
integral part of most process improvement, 
re-engineering and total quality management 
efforts in business and industry. 

IE 609 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics 

IE 624 Quality Analysis 

IE 643 Reliability and Maintainability 

IE 688 Design of Experiments 

Total credits: 12 

See page 54 for the concentration in 
operations research. 

Concentration in International 
Business 

Concentration Adviser: Michael Kublin, 
Professor of Marketing and International 
Business, Ph.D., New York University 

This concentration is designed to pre- 
pare managers to deal with the latest 
methods of analysis related to international 
business. These include the basic techniques 
and skills, such as adapting to new political 
and cultural environments, which are not 
normally covered by traditional courses. It 
is strongly recommended that students 
contact the international business adviser as 
early as possible to program the appropri- 
ate sequence of courses. Students in this 
concentration are required to take IB 643 



International Business in the Global Issues 
area of the M.B.A. Advanced Courses. 

Any four of the following: 

EC 641 International Economics, or 

FI 632 International Financial 

Management 
IB 645 Comparative International Business 

Environments 
IB 650 International Business Negotiating 
IB 651 International Marketing 
IB 652 Multinational Business Management 
IB 660 East and Southeast Asian Business 

Systems 
IB 670 Selected Topics 
IB 693 Internship 
Total credits: 12 

See page 113 for the certificate in interna- 
tional business. 

Concentration in Logistics 

Concentration Adviser: Alexis N. Sommers, 
Professor of Industrial Engineering, 
Ph.D., Purdue University 

Although an old field of study tradition- 
ally associated with the military, logistics 
has emerged as an important management 
specialty in organizations dealing with 
complex systems and large, multiphase 
projects. Logistics is the modem science of 
making sure that needs are met when they 
occur, at a reasonable resource expenditure. 
This necessitates customer requirements 
planning, design-to-cost concepts, optimal 
system acquisition, life cycle analysis, 
transportation and distribution, and field 
support networks. Especially in defense 
industries, logistics is essential in designing, 
acquiring and introducing new weapons 
systems, new communication and supply 
systems, and advanced production and 
distribution concepts. The logistics 
concentration provides a basic working 
knowledge of the discipline and gives a 
background for certification in the area. 

LG 660 Logistics Technology and 
Management 

Plus three of the following: 



Academic Programs 53 

IE 615 Transportation and Distribution 
LG 663 Logistics in Acquisition and 

Manufacturing 
LG 665 Integrated Logistics Support 

Analysis 
LG 669 Life Cycle Cost Analysis 
MG 638 Cost Benefit Management 
Total credits: 12 

See page 115 for the certificates in 
logistics. 

Concentration in Management 
and Organization 

Concentration Adviser: Judith A. Neal, 
Associate Professor of Management, 
Ph.D., Yale University 

This concentration is designed to in- 
crease the student's breadth and depth of 
knowledge about today's complex organi- 
zations. The concentration focuses on 
functions of the manager as leader, as 
strategy formulator and as an effective 
representative of the organization in 
interaction with stakeholders. 

MG 655 Corporate Governance and 

Business Strategy 
MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 

Plus any two of the following: 

MG 641 Managing the Quality Process 

MG 645 Management of Human Resources 

MG 650 Entrepreneurship 

MG 661 Development of Management 
Thought 

MG 662 Organization Theory 

MG 663 Leadership and Team Building (if 
not taken as Advanced Course) 

MG 667 Multicultural Issues in the Work- 
place (if not taken as Advanced Course) 

MG 680 Current Topics in Business 
Administration 

MG 685 Research Methods in Business 
Administration 

P 642 Organizational Change and Develop- 
ment (if not taken as Advanced Course) 

Total credits: 12 

See page 108 for the certificate in Busi- 
ness Management. 



54 



Concentration in Management 
Science 

Concentration Adviser: William Pan, 
Professor of Quantitative Analysis, 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

This concentration gives the student the 
quantitative knowledge and skills needed 
by managers in changing technologically 
oriented organizations. It reinforces and 
improves the manager's information 
processing and decision-making skills. 

Any four of the following: 

EC 653 Econometrics 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Re- 
search/Management Science 

IE 604 Management Systems 

MG 638 Cost Benefit Management 

MG 685 Research Methods in Business 
Administration 

QA 606 Advanced Management Science 

QA 607 Forecasting 

QA 675 Computer- Aided Multivariate 
Analysis 

Total credits: 12 

Concentration in Marketing 

Concentration Adviser: David J. Morris, Jr., 
Professor of Marketing, Ph.D., Syracuse 
University 

The concentration in marketing allows 
the student to develop analytic skills and a 
deeper understanding of marketing phe- 
nomena. Specific emphasis is given to the 
development of content knowledge and 
skills necessary for operating managers of 
the marketing function. 

MK 639 Marketing Research and Informa- 
tion Systems 
MK 641 Marketing Management 

Plus two of the following: 
IB 651 International Marketing 
MK 616 Buyer Behavior 
MK 632 Nonprofit and Services Marketing 
MK 638 Competitive Marketing Strategy 
MK 643 Product Management (if not taken as 
Advanced Course) 



MK 645 Distribution Strategy 
MK 670 Selected Topics 
MK 680 Marketing Workshop 
MK 693 Internship 
Total credits: 12 

See page 115 for the certificate in 
marketing. 

Concentration in Operations 
Research 

Concentration Adviser: M. Ali Montazer, 
Professor of Industrial Engineering, 
Ph.D., State University of New York at 
Buffalo 

Operations research involves the appli- 
cation of scientific /quantitative techniques 
to problem solving in business and industry 
and in matters of public policy. Students 
may choose to concentrate in either Track I 
or Track II, so long as course prerequisites 
are met.* 

Track I: Deterministic Modeling 

This track provides the student with knowl- 
edge and understanding of linear/nonlinear 
programming techniques and network 
optimization and their applications to 
business and manufacturing problems. 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations 
Research /Management Science 

IE 621 Linear Programming 

IE 625 Advanced Mathematical 
Programming 

IE 685 Theory of Optimization 

Total credits: 12 

Track II: Probabilistic Modeling 

This track provides the student with knowl- 
edge and understanding of probabilistic 
modeling and analysis as they are applied to 
business and manufacturing problems that 
are stochastic in nature. 



IE 607 Probability Theory 
IE622 Queueing Theory 
IE 681 System Simulation 
IE 687 Stochastic Processes 
Total credits: 12 



*To meet the professional needs and interests of students, 
substitutions of other IE courses may be allowed with the 
approval of the concentration adviser. 

See page 101 for the M.S. degree pro- 
gram in operations research. 

Concentration in Public 
Relations 

Concentration Adviser: Steven A. Raucher, 
Professor of Communication, Ph.D., 
Wayne State University 

The concentration in public relations is 
designed to orient managers to and prepare 
public relations practitioners for the many 
demands placed on public and private 
corporations and state and local govern- 
ments. 

The program focuses on theory, media 
relations and contemporary issues affecting 
business and the public. 

CO 621 Managerial Communication 
CO 631 Public Information Dynamics 
CO 632 Contemporary Public Relations 
Issues 

Plus one of the following: 

MG 680 Current Topics in Business 
Administration 

MK 639 Marketing Research and Informa- 
tion Systems 

P 638 Psychology of Communication and 
Opinion Change 

Total credits: 12 

Concentration in Sports 
Management 

Concentration Adviser: Allen L. Sack, 
Professor of Management, Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State University 

As sports has grown as an industry, the 
need has increased for sports managers 
with specialized business skills and train- 
ing. This concentration is designed for 
students who would like to pursue careers 
in the sports industry as well as for those 
who already work in this industry who are 
seeking career advancement. 



Academic Programs 55 

MG 610 The Sports Industry 
Plus three of the following: 

CO 632 Contemporary Public Relations 

Issues 
EC 687 Collective Bargaining 
HT 642 Travel Markets: Business and 

Leisure 
MG 611 Marketing and Promotions in Sport 
MG 612 Sports Law 
MG 613 Sports Facility Management 
MG 694 Internship 
PS 612 Contracts, Torts and the Practice of 

Law 
Total credits: 12 

Concentration in Technology 
Management 

Concentration Adviser: Neal Gersony, 
Assistant Professor of Management, 
Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Distinctive competence in the manage- 
ment of technology provides the competi- 
tive edge that individuals and organizations 
need to excel in today's high-technology 
climate. This concentration links technology 
and management disciplines to address the 
planning, development and implementation 
of technological capabilities to shape and 
accomplish the strategic and operational 
objectives of an organization. 

MG 641 Managing the Quality Process 
MG 642 New Business Development from 
Technology 

Plus two of the following: 

MG 638 Cost Benefit Management 

MG 650 Entrepreneurship 

MG 655 Corporate Governance and Busi- 
ness Strategy 

MG 663 Leadership and Team Building (if 
not taken as Advanced Course) 

MK 643 Product Management (if not taken as 
Advanced Course) 

Total credits: 12 

See page 118 for the certificate in tech- 
nology management. 



56 



Business 
Administration/ 
Industrial Engineering 
Dual Degree Program 
(M.B.A./M.S.I.E) 

Coordinator: M. Ali Montazer, Professor of 
Industrial Engineering, Ph.D., State 
University of New York at Buffalo 

The Graduate School has ahvays encour- 
aged interdisciplinary studies. To foster a 
broader expertise in the areas of business 
administration and industrial engineering, a 
student can earn degrees in both fields by 
successfully completing this dual degree 
program. 

The program is intended for students 
with undergraduate engineering or techni- 
cal degrees from programs accredited by 
the Accreditation Board for Engineering 
and Technology, or demonstrated equiva- 
lent. Students entering this program are 
expected to be competent in mathematics 
through calculus. Those with insufficient 
mathematics background will be required 
to take approved mathematics courses (e.g., 
M 610 Fundamentals of Calculus) outside/ 
in addition to the program requirements. 

Applicants with degrees in fields other 
than industrial engineering will be required 
to take a number of undergraduate courses 
or otherwise demonstrate proficiency in 
several areas normally included in an 
industrial engineering program. 

Applicants to the dual degree program 
are required to meet the requirements 
outlined in the admissions policy sections 
of each of the relevant degree programs, 
including submission of scores from the 
Graduate Management Admissions Test 
(GMAT) as specified in the M.B.A. program 
description. 

M.B.A./M.S.I.E. Dual Degree 

The M.B.A./M.S.I.E. program consists of 
72 credit hours. Up to 12 of these credit 



hours may be waived on the basis of 
undergraduate coursework, leaving a 
minimum requirement of 60 credit hours. 
Any waiver(s) of coursework from the 
M.B.A. side of the curriculum must meet 
the waiver guidelines of the M.B.A. pro- 
gram. All waivers must be approved in 
writing by the appropriate department and 
are conditional upon subsequent academic 
performance. Graduate credit may be 
transferred from other accredited institu- 
tions subject to the Graduate School policy 
on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this 
catalog. 

In all cases, the residency requirement 
for the two degrees shall be 60 credit hours 
completed at the University of New Haven. 

Project/Thesis Requirement 

All students in the dual degree program 
must complete the required business 
administration capstone course MG 669 
Strategic Management. In addition, all dual 
degree students must complete an indus- 
trial engineering special project or thesis 
within the elective portion of the program. 
The industrial engineering special project 
requirement may be satisfied by taking a 
project course in a group setting when these 
are offered. A designated area of study may 
be indicated for each such industrial 
engineering project course; in these cases, 
the instructor will offer direction in the area 
and will assist students in the development 
of substantial individual projects. Particular 
requirements or prerequisites may be set for 
the course or for those individuals intend- 
ing to complete a project. In appropriate 
cases having special approval, a student 
may take a Research Project or Thesis (as 
listed in the catalog) on an individual basis. 

Required Courses 

Business Core Courses (waivable)* 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 
EC 601 Macroeconomics and 

Microeconomics 
FI 601 Finance 

MG 637 Management Process 
MK 609 Marketing 



Advanced Business Courses (not 
waivable) 

CO 621 Managerial Communication, or 

MG 663 Leadership and Team Building 
A 654 Financial Statements: Reporting and 

Analysis, or 

FI 602 Corporate Valuation and Strategy 
EC 641 International Economics, or 

IB 643 International Business 
MG 667 Multicultural Issues in the 

Workplace, or 

P 642 Organizational Change and 

Development 
EC 629 Business and Society 
MG 669 Strategic Management 

Industrial Engineering Courses: 

CS 606 Technical Programming/ FORTRAN 
IE 601 Introduction to Operations 

Research/Management Science 
IE 607 Probability Theory 
IE 609 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics 
IE 623 Decision Analysis 
IE 624 Quality Analysis 
IE 651 Human Engineering I 
IE 655 Manufacturing Analysis 
IE 681 System Simulation 
IE 686 Inventory Analysis 
IE 688 Design of Experiments 
Approved IE Electives (two courses, 

including IE thesis/project) 
Total credits: 72 

*Up to four of the five Business Core Courses (not more 
than 12 credits) may be waived by students who meet the 
ivaiver guidelines established for these courses within the 
M.B.A. program; seepages 48-49 for information. 

Business 

Administration/Public 
Administration Dual 
Degree Program 
(M.B.A./M.PA.) 

Coordinator: Charles Coleman, Assistant 
Professor of Public Administration, 
M.P.A., West Virginia University 

The M.B.A. /M. P. A. dual degree program 
is designed for those students whose 



Academic Programs 57 

interests or career objectives are focused at 
both the public and private sectors of the 
economy. The program broadly stresses the 
use of management skills and analytic 
techniques applied to business, industrial, 
governmental and not-for-profit organiza- 
tions. 

Applicants to the dual degree program 
are required to meet the requirements 
outlined in the admissions policy sections 
of each of the relevant degree programs, 
including submission of scores from the 
Graduate Management Admissions Test 
(GMAT) as specified in the M.B.A. program 
description. 

M.B.A./M.P.A. Dual Degree 

The M.B.A./M.P.A. program consists of 
75 credit hours. Up to 15 of these credit 
hours may be waived on the basis of 
undergraduate coursework, leaving a 
minimum requirement of 60 credit hours. 
All waivers must be approved in writing by 
the appropriate department and are condi- 
tional upon subsequent academic perfor- 
mance. 

Graduate credit may be transferred from 
other accredited institutions subject to the 
Graduate School policy on transfer credit 
detailed elsewhere in this catalog. In all 
cases, the residency requirement for the two 
degrees shall be 60 credit hours completed 
at the University of New Haven. Within 
these 60 credit hours, a minimum of 21 
credit hours must be earned in business 
courses and a minimum of 21 credit hours 
must be earned in public administration 
courses. 

Project/Thesis Requirement 

Students must choose one of two alter- 
natives for completion of the final six 
credits of coursework In the M.B.A./M.P.A. 
dual degree curriculum. Most students will 
take the two capstone /research project 
courses PA 690 Research Seminar and MG 
669 Strategic Management. Alternatively, 
students may elect to take the two-course, 
six-credit thesis option (Thesis I and II). If 
the thesis option is selected, the thesis must 
show ability to organize material in a clear 



58 



and original manner and present well- 
reasoned conclusions. Thesis preparation 
and submission must comply with the 
Graduate School policy on theses as well as 
all specific department requirements. 

Required Courses 

Business Core Courses (waivable)* 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 
EC 601 Macroeconomics and 

Microeconomics 
Fl 601 Finance 

MG 637 Management Process 
MK 609 Marketing 
QA 604 Probability and Statistics 

Advanced Business Courses (not 
waivable) 

CO 621 Managerial Communication, or 

MG 663 Leadership and Team Building 
MG 614 Decisions in (Operations 

Management, or 

MK 643 Product Management 
A 654 Financial Statements: Reporting and 

Analysis, or 

FI 602 Corporate Valuation and Business 

Strategy 
EC 641 International Economics, or 

IB 643 International Business 
MG 667 Multicultural Issues in the 

Workplace, or 

P 642 Organizational Change and 

Development 
EC 629 Business & Society 
MG 669 Strategic Management 
Business Electives (two courses) 

Public Administration Courses 

PA 601 Principles of Public Administration 
PA 602 Public Policy Formulation and 

Implementation 
PA 604 Communities and Social Change 
PA 611 Research Methods in Public 

Administration 
PA 620 Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public 

Sector 
PA 625 Administrative Behavior 
PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 



PA 690 Research Seminar 

Public Administration Electives (two 

courses) 
Total credits: 75 

*Up to five of the six Business Core Courses (not more than 
15 credits) may be waived by students who meet the waiver 
guidelines established for these courses ivithin the M.B.A. 
program; see page 48-49 for information. 

Cellular and Molecular 
Biology 

Coordinator: Michael J. Rossi, Assistant 
Professor of Biology and Environmental 
Science, Ph.D., University of Kentucky 

The master of science program in 
cellular and molecular biology is intended 
for those individuals interested in the 
rapidly expanding fields of biotechnology, 
basic science and pharmacological research. 
The level of experience required for an 
individual to contribute in these fields is not 
satisfied by an undergraduate degree; 
therefore, individuals with advanced 
training are in demand. 

This program, with a strong emphasis on 
biochemistry and techniques, will provide 
students with the preparation needed to 
meet this need for advanced training. The 
central curriculum consists of courses in 
biochemistry, cell biology and molecular 
biology. These courses will develop the 
student's ability to function as an indepen- 
dent scientist by stressing both the concep- 
tual and technical aspects of each subject. 

Admission Policy 

Application for the cellular and molecu- 
lar biology program may be submitted at 
any time; however, admission to the pro- 
gram will be granted for the Fall trimester 
only. 

Candidates for admission to the cellular 
and molecular biology program are ex- 
pected to have a bachelor's degree in 
biology, chemistry or a related discipline. 
The undergraduate coursework should 
have included general biology, advanced 
biology electives, general chemistry and 
organic chemistry. It is also recommended 



that applicants have taken introductory 
statistics, calculus, molecular biology and 
biochemistry. 

Students who do not hold a bachelor's 
degree in an appropriate field or who lack 
the minimum program prerequisite require- 
ments may be provisionally accepted to the 
program. Students receiving provisional 
acceptance must complete the requirements 
stipulated at the beginning of the program 
of study. Upon completion of the provi- 
sional requirements, the student's record 
will be evaluated for full admission. In 
addition, provisionally accepted students 
may be prevented from enrolling in certain 
specific graduate courses until prerequisites 
are met, as determined by the program 
coordinator. 

M.S., Cellular and Molecular 
Biology 

A minimum of 38 credit hours of gradu- 
ate work must be completed to earn the 
master of science degree in cellular and 
molecular biology. The program consists of 
seven required courses and at least five 
elective courses. 

Students are required to participate in 
research. The research requirement may be 
satisfied by completion of a research project, 
an internship or a thesis. Cooperative 
education experience may also be used for 
research credit with the approval of the 
program coordinator. 

Students who elect to write a thesis as 
part of the program of study must take MB 
698 and 699, Thesis I and II, in lieu of two 
elective courses in the program. Thesis 
preparation and submission must comply 
with the Graduate School policy on theses 
as well as all specific department require- 
ments. 

Required Courses 

BI 605 Biostatistics 

E 659 Writing and Speaking for 

Professionals 
MB 601 Protein Biochemistry and 

Enzymology 
MB 603 Biochemistry of Information 

Pathways 



Academic Programs 59 

MB 607 Cellular Biology 

MB 611 Molecular Biology of Proteins with 

Laboratory (4 credits) 
MB 613 Molecular Biology of Nucleic Acids 

with Laboratory (4 credits) 
Approved Electives (five courses) 
Total credits: 38-41 

Electives 

MB 602 Biochemistry of Bioenergetics 
MB 620 Computer Applications in Cell and 

Molecular Biology with Laboratory 
MB 636 Immunology 
MB 644 Cellular Development 
MB 648 Cytoskeleton and Extracellular 

Matrix 
MB 650 Oncogenes and Cytokines 
MB 656 Receptor Effector Systems 
MB 670 Selected Topics 
MB 680 Graduate Seminar 
MB 688/689 Internship I and II 
MB 690 Research Project 
MB 695/696 Independent Study I and II 
MB 698/699 Thesis I and II 
MG 670 Selected Topics (in Biotechnology 

Management) 

Community Psychology 

Coordinator: Robert J. Hoffnung, Professor 
of Psychology, Ph.D., University of 
Cincinnati 

Community psychology applies the 
theories and techniques of psychology and 
related social sciences to understanding and 
modifying the complex social forces which 
influence individual and community well- 
being. 

Accordingly, the master of arts program 
in community psychology provides broad 
training in current approaches to prevent- 
ing and treating psychological distress at 
the level of social institutions, organizations 
and groups rather than just the individual. 
Methods of community analysis, consulta- 
tion and crisis intervention are considered 
as well as program development, adminis- 
tration and evaluation. 

Classroom study is closely integrated 
with supervised field experiences in a 



60 



variety of human service organizations and 
community settings. 

Graduates are able to assume positions 
of responsibility in a broad range of human 
service settings, such as mental health 
programs, youth service bureaus, commu- 
nity centers, child development programs, 
municipal services, halfway houses, senior 
citizen centers, private agencies, health care 
systems and community action programs. 

This master's degree program in 
community psychology at the University of 
New Haven conforms to the standards of 
The Council of Applied Master's Programs 
in Psychology (CAMPP). 

Admission Policy 

An undergraduate degree from an 
accredited institution is required. A major in 
psychology is preferred but not required. 
However, all students are expected to have 
at least an introductory-level understanding 
of psychological concepts, principles and 
methods before entering. Students who 
have not had an undergraduate course in 
statistical methods will be required to take 
one before entry into P 609. Related work 
experience as well as academic performance 
is considered in admission decisions. 

Along with the application materials 
required by the Graduate School, applicants 
may be asked to submit a questionnaire. 
Applicants may be required to submit 
scores from either the Miller Analogies Test 
or the Graduate Record Examination 
Aptitude Test, at the discretion of the 
department. Students intending to go on for 
further graduate work are strongly encour- 
aged to take the GRE early in their first year 
of study in the master's program. 

Fieldwork and Seminars 

Supervised field experience in a variety 
of settings is a major vehicle through which 
students in the program develop applied 
skills. Students plan their fieldwork activi- 
ties in collaboration with both the 
program's field training director and their 
supervisors from the field setting. Field 
experience is provided in the areas of 
individual intervention, consultation and 



systems intervention. Students with a year 
or more of appropriate full-time human 
service experience in a particular fieldwork 
area will be allowed to substitute an elective 
course for the fieldwork course in that area, 
contingent upon the approval of the com- 
munity psychology program coordinator. 

In addition to the fieldwork, three 
separate seminar courses provide a theoreti- 
cal and research framework within which 
the development of these applied skills will 
be examined and discussed. These seminars 
enable students to conceptualize the issues 
encountered in the field within a broader 
context. In addition, a comprehensive 
project report in which students analyze 
and integrate fieldwork experience with 
relevant research and coursework is re- 
quired. 

Thesis 

Students may elect to write a thesis as 
part of the program of study. The thesis 
must show ability to organize materials in a 
clear and original manner and present well- 
reasoned conclusions. A thesis is strongly 
recommended for students wishing to 
pursue doctoral training after graduation. 
Thesis preparation and submission must 
comply with the Graduate School policy on 
theses as well as all specific department 
requirements. 

M.A., Community Psychology 

The program consists of 42 credit hours, 
21 of which comprise the core curriculum 
completed by all students and 12 of which 
constitute one of three areas of concentra- 
tion. Typically, students complete most of 
the core requirements before focusing on 
the concentrations. 

Required Courses 

P 605 Survey of Community Psychology 

P 609 Research Methods 

P 610 Program Evaluation 

P 612 Consultation Seminar 

P 615 Consultation Fieldwork 

P 611 Individual Intervention Seminar, or 

P 613 Systems Intervention Seminar 
P 614 Individual Intervention Fieldwork, or 



P 616 Systems Intervention Fieldwork 
Electives (three courses) 
Concentration (four courses) 
Total credits: 42 

Concentration in Community- 
Clinical Services 

The community-clinical services concen- 
tration is designed to prepare students for 
careers in clinical, mental health and related 
human service settings. Direct work with 
individuals within the social and communi- 
ty contexts in which they live as well as 
consultation, social problem analysis, and 
prevention techniques and strategies are 
stressed. 

P 625 Life Span Developmental Psychology 

P 628 The Interview 

P 629 Introduction to Psychotherapy and 

Counseling 
P 632 Group Treatment and Family Therapy 
Total credits: 12 

See page 102 for the community-clinical 
concentration offered in the degree program 
leading to the master's of public adminis- 
tration (M.P.A.) and page 65 for the correc- 
tional counseling concentration in the 
master of science program in Criminal 
Justice. 

Concentration in Mental 
Retardation Services 

The concentration in mental retardation 
services is designed to prepare profession- 
als who will work in public or private 
residential facilities for mentally retarded 
adults. Training in life skills through the use 
of behavior modification techniques is an 
important part of such work, and the 
concentration provides intensive training in 
behavior modification in two courses and in 
the two fieldwork experiences. 

P 621 Behavior Modification I: Principles, 

Theories and Applications 
P 622 Behavior Modification II: Advanced 

Theory, Assessment and Application in 

Mental Retardation Settings 
P 625 Life Span Developmental Psychology 



Academic Programs 61 

P 637 Mental Retardation: History, Theory 

and Practice 
Total credits: 12 

See page 116 for the certificate in mental 
retardation services. 

Concentration in Program 
Development 

The program development concentration 
is designed to prepare students for careers 
which emphasize the administration of 
traditional and nontraditional programs 
and services. The concentration involves 
planning, development and evaluation of 
innovative approaches to treatment and 
prevention at the community, organiza- 
tional and social systems levels in the public 
and private human service sectors as well 
as in business and industry. 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 

P 628 The Interview 

PA 604 Communities and Social Change 

PA 641 Financial Management of Health 

Care Organizations, or 

PA 643 Health and Institutional Planning 
Total credits: 12 

Computer and 
Information Science 

Coordinator: Barun Chandra, Assistant 
Professor of Computer Science, Ph.D., 
University of Chicago 

This program provides advanced 
professional training Ln computer and 
information science, and provides students 
a diversity of experience and subject matter 
through its core, distribution, concentration, 
elective and project requirements. Its 
broad scope recognizes the continuing 
development of computing disciplines and 
applications, and allows students to prepare 
for this. The program can be used to enter, 
or advance in, the computing profession or 
an allied field, along a variety of career 
paths. It may also be used to prepare for 
further graduate study. 

Excellent computing facilities are avail- 
able for use by our students. In addition to 



62 



the resources of the university's Depart- 
ment of Information Services, students in 
our program and courses may use the 
computing facilities of the School of Engi- 
neering, and those of the Department of 
Computer Science. 

M.S., Computer and 
Information Science 

The program consists of 48 credit hours 
of coursework. This may be reduced in 
some situations through waivers or transfer 
credits, in conformity with Graduate School 
and program policies. The six core courses 
are eligible for waiver; courses not in the 
core may not be waived, but transfer credit 
and substitution may apply. Students with 
insufficient programming background 
either to take or to waive CS 610 Intermedi- 
ate Programming/C must take CS 603 
Introduction to Programming/ Pascal, 
which will be counted as the student's one 
free elective in the program. Students 
seeking advice or information about the 
program or department are invited to 
contact the program coordinator; students 
should also consult the academic policy 
information elsewhere in this catalog. 
Specifically, the program coordinator will 
provide information on course prerequisites 
and course selection for students affected 
by the transition to the newly designed 
curriculum outlined in this edition of the 
catalog. 

The program has requirements for core, 
distribution, concentration and elective 
courses; within those, a project requirement 
and a programming language requirement 
also must be satisfied. In the following 
sections, course groupings are listed for 
programming languages, for concentrations 
and for restricted electives; these categories 
are used in the overall program description. 
An independent study, project or selected 
topics course may be designated as a 
restricted elective or concentration course 
on a case-by-case basis. Note that all 
prerequisites given in the course descrip- 
tions must be met, possibly with electives or 
by work outside the program. Credit may 



be denied for a course taken without first 
satisfying its prerequisites, unless prior 
written approval is obtained. 

Required Courses 

Core Courses (18 credits; waivable)* 

CS 610 Intermediate Programming/C 

CS 620 Data Structures 

CS 630 Introduction to Computing Theory 

CS 632 Algorithm Design and Analysis 

CS 640 Computer Organization 

CS 644 Operating Systems 

Distribution Courses (12 credits) 

Software Design Methodology 
(choose one) 

CS 624 Software Engineering 

CS 626 Object-Oriented Principles and 

Practice/C++ 

Theory and Analysis (choose one) 

CS 631 Intermediate Computing Theory 
CS 636 Structure of Languages 

Software Systems (choose one) 
CS 622 Database Systems 
CS 638 Compiler Design 
CS 647 Systems Programming/C 

Computer Systems (choose one) 

CS 640B Parallel Computer Architectures 
CS 642 Computer Networks and Data 

Communication 

CS 644B Advanced Operating 
Systems 

Concentration Courses and Project 

Requirement (9 credits) 
Electives (9 credits) 
Total credits: 48 

*Required of all program students, the core courses may be 
waived with appropriate prior academic background. Until 
all core courses have been either waived or successfully 
completed, enrollment in non-core courses is restricted to 
three courses. 

Concentration Courses and Project 
Requirement 

Each student will select three courses 
from one concentration area. One of these 
three courses must satisfy the project 
requirement, which may be either (1) a 



project within one of the student's concen- 
tration courses for which prior approval 
and written certification of completion is 
granted by the instructor or (2) completion 
of the CS 690 Project course, with subject 
matter approved in the proposal that is 
within the student's area of concentration 
which would allow the CS 690 course to 
serve as one of the three courses in the 
concentration requirement. 

Electives 

At least two of the elective courses will 
be chosen from the list of Restricted Elec- 
tives, and possibly all three. After the core 
requirement, all of a student's program 
courses must be Restricted Electives with 
the exception of one Free Elective selection, 
which is a graduate course that may or may 
not be a Restricted Elective. A free elective 
must bear a reasonable relation to the 
student's overall program and career 
objectives. Note that not every Program- 
ming Language and Concentration course is 
a Restricted Elective, and a student must be 
careful to complete successfully at least nine 
(9) Restricted Electives in the program, plus 
the Core. 

Programming Language 
Requirement 

Each student must demonstrate mastery 
of two distinct, higher-level computer 
languages: C language from the core, plus 
at least one more other than C++. This may 
be done by (a) completion, within the above 
program requirements, of at least one of the 
courses in the Programming Languages 
group other than CS 603 and CS 626, or (b) 
through course work done prior to matricu- 
lation in the program and of a type deemed 
suitable by the program coordinator. 

COURSE CLASSIFICATIONS 

Programming Languages 

CS 603 Introduction to Programming/ 

Pascal* 
CS 605 Business Programming/COBOL 
CS 606 Technical Programming/ 

FORTRAN 
CS 616 Assembly Language 



Academic Programs 63 

CS 626 Object-Oriented Principles and 

Practice/C++ 
CS 636 Structure of Programming 

Languages 
CS 660 Artificial Intelligence /Scheme 

*CS 603 is a Free Elective course only, and it may not 
be counted as a Restricted Elective. 

Concentration Course Areas 

Software Design Methodology 

CS 620B File Structures 
CS 621 Applied Algorithms 
CS 624 Software Engineering 
CS 626 Object-Oriented Principles and 
Practice/C++ 

CS 628 Object-Oriented Design 
CS 638 Compiler Design 
CS 646 Data Parallel Programming 
CS 647 Systems Programming/C 

Computer Systems 

CS 616 Assembly Language 

Programming 
CS 620B File Structures 
CS 640B Parallel Computer 

Architectures 
CS 642 Computer Networks and Data 

Communication 
CS 644B Advanced Operating Systems 
EE 615 Introduction to Computer Logic 
EE 658 Microprocessors — Theory and 

Applications 

Management Information Systems 

CS 605 Business Programming/COBOL 
CS 622 Database Systems 
CS 622B Advanced Database Systems 
CS 648 Computer System Analysis and 

Selection 
IE 601 Introduction to Operations 

Research /Management Science 
IE 623 Decision Analysis 
IE 681 System Simulation 

Advanced Applications 

CS 621 Applied Algorithms 

CS 622 Database Systems 

CS 622B Advanced Database Systems 

CS 650 Computer Graphics 

CS 650B Advanced Computer Graphics 



64 



CS 660 Artificial Intelligence/Scheme 

CS 662 Expert Systems 

CS 664 Neural Networks 

CS 665 Digital Image Processing 

CS 666 Image Recognition 

IE 681 System Simulation 

IE 682 Advanced System Simulation 

Restricted Electives 

Referring to categories described above, 
the Restricted Elective courses include all 
the Distribution requirement courses, all 
Programming Language courses with the 
exception of CS 603, and all Concentration 
courses. Other courses (independent study, 
project or selected topic courses) may be 
designated to be Restricted Electives on a 
case-by-case basis. The following courses 
are also Restricted Electives: 

IE 607 Probability Theory 

IE 609 Descriptive and Inferential 

Statistics 
IE 621 Linear Programming 
IE 622 Queueing Theory 
IE 625 Advanced Mathematical 

Programming 
IE 685 Theory of Optimization 
IE 687 Stochastic Processes 
IE 688 Design of Experiments 
M 615 Linear Mathematics and 

Combinatorics 
M 620 Numerical Analysis 
M 624 Applied Mathematics 



Criminal Justice 

Coordinator: William M. Norton, Associate 
Professor of Criminal Justice; Ph.D., 
Florida State University; J.D., University 
of Connecticut Law School 

A key objective of the master of science 
in criminal justice program is the training 
and education of men and women planning 
careers in the field of criminal justice as well 
as the advanced training and education of 
those who staff the agencies and institutions 
of the criminal justice system. 



The program stresses a broad under- 
standing of the social and behavioral 
sciences, the institutions of the criminal 
justice system and the development of 
methodological tools and skills. 

The courses in the area of social and 
behavioral science stress the theories of the 
behavior of man in a social order and the 
sanctions imposed by different societies to 
control the social behavior of their mem- 
bers. Courses in the area of criminal justice 
institutions stress the study of the existing 
system from the police through the courts, 
the penitentiaries and the system of proba- 
tion and parole. The methodological 
courses expose students to the tools of 
research and analysis and the contribution 
of systems analysis to the efficient adminis- 
tration of the criminal justice system. 

M.S., Criminal Justice 

A total of 39 credit hours is required of 
candidates for the degree of master of 
science in criminal justice. 

Candidates must complete the core 
curriculum. After consultation with an 
adviser, students select electives from 
approved courses in the departments of 
criminal justice, economics, fire science, 
psychology, political science, sociology, 
industrial engineering and management/ 
public administration. 

The transfer of credit from other institu- 
tions will be permitted subject to the 
Graduate School policy on transfer credit 
detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 

Thesis 

Students may elect to write a thesis in 
lieu of CJ 690/691 Research Project and 
three credits of elective coursework. Regis- 
tration for a minimum of six thesis credits 
(CJ 697/698) would be required. The thesis 
must show ability to organize material in a 
clear and original manner and present well- 
reasoned conclusions. Thesis preparation 
and submission must comply with the 
Graduate School policy on theses as well as 
all specific department requirements. 



Required Courses* 

CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 

CJ 605 Social Deviance 

CJ 610 Administration of Justice 

CJ 637 Contemporary Issues in Criminal 

Justice 
CJ 651 Criminal Procedure 
CJ 690/691 Research Project (3 credits) 
PA 611 Research Methods in Public 

Administration 
Approved Electives (six courses) 
Total credits: 39 

*As an alternative to the program listed above a student 
may select one of the following three concentrations. 

Concentrations 

There are three concentrations — correc- 
tional counseling, criminal justice manage- 
ment and security management — from 
which students may choose more special- 
ized programs. 

Concentration in Correctional 
Counseling 

This program, offered jointly between 
the criminal justice program and the 
department of psychology, is designed for 
those individuals currently in correctional 
counseling positions or those who antici- 
pate a career in correctional counseling. 

CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 

CJ 610 Administration of Justice 

CJ 624 Group Process in Criminal Justice 

CJ 690/691 Research Project (3 credits) 

CJ 693 Criminal Justice Internship T 

P 605 Survey of Community Psychology 

P 611 Individual Intervention Seminar* 

P 628 The Interview 

P 629 Introduction to Psychotherapy and 

Counseling 
Criminal Justice Electives* (two courses) 
Psychology Electives* (two courses) 
Total credits: 39 

*C] 693 Criminal Justice Internship I is to be taken prior to 
or in the same term as P 611 Individual Intervention 
Semitjar. Electives will be selected with approval of adviser 
Students may be required to take C] 694 Criminal Justice 



Academic Programs 65 

Internship II, based on experience, ability and background. 

Concentration in Criminal 
Justice Management 

This concentration is designed for those 
individuals wishing to pursue a career in 
the management of a criminal justice 
agency. Courses are offered jointly between 
the criminal justice and the public 
administration programs. 

CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 

CJ 605 Social Deviance 

CJ 610 Administration of Justice 

CJ 612 Criminal Justice Management 

CJ 651 Criminal Procedure 

CJ 690/691 Research Project (3 credits) 

PA 602 Public Policy Formulation and 

Implementation, or 

PA 604 Communities and Social Change 
PA 611 Research Methods in Public 

Administration 
PA 620 Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public 

Sector 
PA 630 Fiscal Management for Local 

Government, or 

PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 
Approved Electives (three courses) 
Total credits: 39 

Concentration in Security 
Management 

This concentration is designed for those 
individuals who are pursuing or wish to 
pursue careers in security management 
within business or industry. Coursework 
stresses broad interaction among the areas 
of security, business administration, fire 
science and criminal justice. 

CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 
CJ 605 Social Deviance 
CJ 612 Criminal Justice Management 
CJ 614 Survey of Forensic Science 
CJ 669 Dynamics, Evaluation and Preven- 
tion of Structural Fires 
CJ 675 Private Security Law 
CJ 676 Security Management Seminar 
CJ 677 Private Security in Modern Society 
CJ 690/691 Research Project (3 credits) 
SH 602 Safety Organization and 
Administration 



66 



Approved Elective (one course) 

Plus two of the following: 

CJ 637 Contemporary Issues in Criminal 

Justice 
EC 625 Industrial Relations 
EC 687 Collective Bargaining 
PA 625 Administrative Behavior 
Total credits: 39 

See the table of contents for a listing of 
the certificates related to criminal justice 
and /or public safety. 

Education Programs 

The university's Gatehouse Programs in 
Education, described in the following 
pages, provide three alternatives for gradu- 
ate study in education: (1) Teacher prepara- 
tion for those who wish to obtain certifica- 
tion; (2) Professional Education for those 
who are already in the field; and (3) School 
Administration for those seeking certifica- 
tion in leadership roles. These programs are 
symbolic of the university's commitment to 
the attainment of the highest standards for 
preparing and revitalizing educators to 
accept the challenges of the 21st century 
and the cause of educational reform. 

Education: Teacher 
Certification 

Coordinator: Louise M. Soares, Professor of 
Education, Ph.D., University of Illinois 

This program, leading to the master of 
science in education, prepares teachers for 
diverse populations of students at different 
stages of development. The approach is 
interdisciplinary, reflective and knowledge- 
based. It is a collateral training program 
which combines theory and practice. It 
features immersion in clusters of content 
and instructional skills as well as research 
on the practice of teaching. 

Admission Policy 

Applicants must hold a baccalaureate 



degree from an accredited institution of 
higher learning with a minimum of 39 
semester hours in general education and 39 
credits in an academic major or 
interdisciplinary major. An undergraduate 
grade point average of 2.7 (equivalent of a 
B-) is expected for admission to the pro- 
gram. Students with undergraduate grade 
point averages between 2.4 and 2.7 may 
require additional assessments and may be 
accepted provisionally. Specific background 
requirements may change with State of 
Connecticut legislative actions. Students 
should inquire about current laws at the 
university's Education Department Office. 

In addition to the required three letters 
of recommendation, applicants are also 
required to submit an essay setting forth 
their reasons for enrolling in the teacher 
training program, emphasizing experience 
relevant to teaching. 

Each applicant is required to complete 
an interview with a staff team and receive a 
successful evaluation. For an internship, 
applicants must also be interviewed and 
approved by a sponsoring school district. 

For Connecticut certification, the state- 
mandated basic skills examination must be 
passed, or an approved waiver obtained. 
Exit examinations are also required in 
Connecticut and in many other states. 

M.S., Education (Teacher 
Certification) 

A total of 36 credit hours is required for 
completion of the master of science in 
education. Study plan options and certifica- 
tion track options are outlined in the 
following section. The six credits of student 
teaching (ED 600) required for Connecticut 
certification are taken as excess credits and 
do not count toward the credits required in 
the degree program. 

Study Plans 

Within the program, students may select 
from two study plan options: 

• Study Plan Option A is a tuition-free, 
full academic schedule combined with a 
year-long supervised internship which 
links theory with practice and empha- 



sizes service to the schools. 

• Study Plan Option B is an individual- 
ized program with field activities for 
part-time/evening enrollment. Students 
interested in this plan of study should 
contact the program coordinator . 

The expertise of practicing teachers 
across the state will be utilized in the 
preparation of candidates for the profession 
through development of instructional and 
training materials, training procedures, 
supervision, instruction, presentations, 
monitoring of performance and evaluation 
of the program. 

Certification Track Options 

The following areas comprise the 
options from which students may select a 
particular certification track: 

• Elementary Education 

• Middle School Education 

• Secondary Education 

- English and Language Arts 

- History and Social Studies 

- Mathematics 

- Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Earth, or 
General Science 

- Business 

These certification track options fully 
satisfy the requirements for teacher 
certification in Connecticut, which became 
effective July, 1993. State certification laws 
are currently being reviewed; students 
should inquire at the university's Education 
Department. In the event state regulations 
change, the program and curriculum will 
change accordingly. 

Students interested in adding cross- 
endorsements, part-time study and /or 
certification-only study should contact the 
program coordinator for information. 

Elementary (K-6) Certification 

Students complete the program as 
outlined below, selecting the Elementary- 
Level classes (designated by the letter E 
following the course number) and the other 
appropriate course alternatives listed in the 



Academic Programs 67 

curriculum for the completion of the degree 
and certification requirements. 

Middle School (4-8) and Secondary (7-12) 
Certification 

Students complete the program as 
outlined below, selecting the Middle School 
or Secondary-Level classes (designated by 
the letters M or S following the course 
number) and the other appropriate course 
alternatives listed in the curriculum for the 
completion of the degree and certification 
requirements. 

Most courses in this degree program are 
two credits, unless specified otherwise. 

Required Courses 

Foundation Courses (13 credits) 

ED 603 Human Growth and Development 

(2 credits) 
ED 604 The Learning Process (2 credits) 
ED 605 Students with Special Needs 

(3 credits) 
ED 606 History of American Education 

(2 credits) 
ED 607 Survey of United States History 

(3 credits) 
ED 620 Seminar in Multicultural Issues 

(1 credit) 

Track Options (12 credits) 

(1) Elementary School 

ED 621E Teaching Strategies in Mathematics 

(2 credits) 
ED 622E Teaching Strategies in Science 

(2 credits) 
ED 623E Teaching Strategies in Social 

Studies (2 credits) 
ED 625E Teaching Strategies in Language 

Arts /Elementary School (2 credits) 
ED 626E Reading Strategies in Elementary 

School (2 credits) 
ED 630E Literature for Children (2 credits) 

(2) Middle School 

ED 625M Teaching Strategies in Language 

Arts/Middle School (2 credits) 
ED 626M Reading Strategies in the Middle 

School (2 credits) 
ED 630M Literature in the Middle School 

(2 credits) 
ED 654M Organization and Structure in the 



68 



Schools (3 credits) 
ED 682M Measurement, Assessment and 

Evaluation (3 credits) 
(3) Secondary School 
ED 626S Reading Strategies in the 

Secondary School (2 credits) 
ED 627 Writing in the Content Areas 

(1 credit) 
ED 682S Measurement, Assessment and 

Evaluation (3 credits) 
Electives (3-5 credits) 
Choice (2-4 credits) of the following: 

ED 621 S Teaching Strategies in Mathe- 
matics (2 credits) 
ED 622S Teaching Strategies in Science 

(2 credits) 
ED 624 Teaching Strategies in Business 

(2 credits) 
ED 625S Teaching Strategies in 
Language Arts (2 credits) 
ED 630S Literature in the Secondary 
School (2 credits) 

Note: Additional courses in specialized 
strategies (ED 615-619 series) can be taken as 
electives. 

Other Statutory Requirements, in ED 601 
or ED 686: 

Alcohol / Tobacco / Drugs 
Conflict Resolution 

Supervised Observation, Field Study and 
Student Teaching 

ED 686 Intern Orientation and Training 

(2 credits) 
ED 692/693/694 Internship I, II & III 

(6 credits) 
ED 600 Student Teaching (6 excess credits) 

Additional Degree Requirements 

ED 689 Research Design (2 credits) 

Final degree /project requirement; see adviser 

for details: 

ED 690 Research Project (1-3 credits), or 
ED 691 Capstone Project (1-3 credits), or 
Qualifying Examination (0 credit) 

Total credits: 36 (plus Student Teaching) 



*Part-time/evening students will take ED 601 Introduction 
to Education and Field Study in lieu of ED 686 plus six 
credits of elective coursework in lieu of ED 692/693/694 



Internship enrollment. The six credits of student teaching 
requirement for Connecticut certification will be taken in 
excess of the degree requirements for the M.S. in Education: 
Teacher Certification. In other loords, ED 600 Student 
Teaching may not be counted toward the M.S. degree. 
During the 10 weeks (300 hours) of student teaching, 
enrollment in no more than six additional credits from the 
academic program will be allowed. 

Applying for State 
Certification 

The certification process is separate and 
distinct from the petition for graduation. 
When students have completed all the 
professional courses in a chosen track, they 
apply for certification via a process estab- 
lished in the Education Department at 
UNH. The certification officer(s) will check 
the credentials, including all required exit 
examinations, and provide the institutional 
recommendation for the initial certification. 
Second licenses, or cross-endorsements, 
must be pursued by the individual directly 
with the relevant state agency, whether in 
Cormecticut or out of state. The courses 
taken for a particular certification must be 
consistent with the statutory requirements 
of laws current at the time of application for 
certification rather than the laws operating 
at the time of admission to the university. 

Education: Advanced 
Programs in 
Professional Education 

Coordinator: Louise M. Soares, Professor of 
Education, Ph.D., University of Illinois 

This program, also leading to the master 
of science in education, provides a curricu- 
lum for continuing professional growth and 
for additional certification(s). It includes the 
following four tracks: 

Track I: Business Manager 
Track II: Department Chair 
Track III: Provisional Educator 
Track IV: Remedial Reading Specialist 

Admission Policy 



Applicants must hold a baccalaureate 
degree from an accredited institution of 
higher learning. An undergraduate grade 
point average of 2.7 (equivalent of a B-) is 
expected for admission to the program. 
Students with undergraduate grade point 
averages between 2.4 and 2.7 may require 
additional assessments and may be ac- 
cepted provisionally. Applicants must also 
have teacher certification or education 
background. 

In addition to the required two letters of 
recommendation, applicants are required to 
submit an essay setting forth the 
candidate's philosophy of education and 
experiences relevant to teaching. 

Each applicant is required to complete 
an interview with a staff team and receive a 
successful evaluation. 

M.S., Professional Education 

A total of 36 credit hours is required for 
completion of the master of science in 
education. The program includes profes- 
sional course requirements, content require- 
ments and electives. 

All courses in this degree program are 
three credits, unless specified otherwise. 

Required Courses 

ED 611 Learning and Intelligence 

ED 612 Curriculum Design 

ED 682 Measurement, Assessment and 

Evaluation 
ED 685 Research in the Schools 
ED 690 Research Project, or 

ED 691 Capstone Project 
Track Requirements (15 credits) 
Electives (6 credits) 
Total credits: 36 

Track Requirements (15 credits) 
Track I: Business Manager 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 

PA 620 Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public 

Sector 
PA 630 Fiscal Management for Local 

Government 
PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 
PS 640 Law and Education 



Academic Programs 69 

Track II: Department Chair 

ED 620C Seminar in Multicultural Issues 
ED 652 Supervision: Issues and Procedures 
P 619 Organizational Behavior 
Content Area Courses (6 credits) 

Track III: Provisional Educator 

ED 620C Seminar in Multicultural Issues 
Content Area Courses (12 credits) 

Track IV: Remedial Reading Specialist 

ED 625E Teaching Strategies in Language 
Arts /Elementary (2 credits), or 
ED 625S Teaching Strategies in Lan- 
guage Arts /Secondary (2 credits) 

ED 626E Reading Strategies in the 
Elementary School (2 credits) 

ED 626S Reading Strategies in the Second- 
ary School (2 credits) 

ED 628 Reading Diagnosis and Remediation 

ED 697D/E/F Residency I, II & III 
(6 credits) 

Elective Courses (6 credits) 

(Other courses may be selected with 
approval of the program coordinator.) 

ED 613 International Education 
ED 614 Philosophy of Education 
ED 632 Content Updates (1-3 credits) 
ED 642 Current Instructional Trends (2 

credits) 
ED 650 The Classroom Environment 
ED 651 Ethical and Legal Issues 
ED 652 Supervision: Issues and Procedures 
ED 670 Selected Topics (3-6 credits) 
ED 680 Contemporary Issues 
ED 687/688 Field Project I and II 

Accreditation application to the Board of 
Governors for Higher Education, State of 
Connecticut, for this master of science 
degree program in professional education is 
in process at the time of catalog printing. 

Education: School 
Administration 

Coordinator: Louise M. Soares, Professor of 
Education, Ph.D., University of Illinois 

This program enables practicing educa- 



70 



tors to obtain the Intermediate Administra- 
tor/Supervisor Certification or Superinten- 
dency Administrative Certification. It 
includes a tuition-paid residency for those 
who require field experience in the schools. 
Interviews will be arranged with participat- 
ing school districts. Additional require- 
ments enable the student to earn a Sixth 
Year Professional Diploma. 

Admission Policy 

Applicants must hold a master's degree 
from an accredited institution of higher 
learning with a grade point average of 3.0 
or higher. In addition to the required letters 
of recommendation, applicants are also 
required to submit an essay setting forth the 
candidate's philosophy of education and 
experiences relevant to teaching. 

Each applicant is expected to complete 
an interview with a staff team and to 
receive a successful evaluation. 

Sixth Year Professional 
Diploma, School 
Administration 

A total of 36 credit hours is required for 
completion of the sixth year professional 
program in education. Two study tracks are 
available. 

The State of Connecticut is moving 
toward a competencies-based program of 
study in the areas of (1) group dynamics 
and human relationships; (2) political, 
ethical and legal issues; (3) resource alloca- 
tion and management; (4) instructional 
leadership; and (5) organizational develop- 
ment. Students should contact the 
university's Education Department about 
the effective dates of the statutory changes. 
The following course requirements are 
compliant with laws current at press time; 
all courses are three credits unless specified 
otherwise. 

Track I: Intermediate Administrator/ 
Supervisor (18 credits) 

ED 612 Curriculum Design 

ED 652 Supervision: Issues and Procedures 

ED 653 Principles of School Administration 



ED 680 Contemporary Issues 

ED 682 Measurement, Assessment and 

Evaluation 
P 619 Organizational Behavior 
Track II: Superintendency (30 credits) 
ED 612 Curriculum Design 
ED 651 Ethical and Legal Issues 
ED 652 Supervision: Issues and Procedures 
ED 653 Principles of School Administration 
ED 680 Contemporary Issues 
ED 682 Measurement, Assessment and 

Evaluation 
P 619 Organizational Behavior 
PA 620 Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public 

Sector 
PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 
PS 640 Law and Education 

Program Prerequisites 

A course in statistical design, plus the 
following: 

ED 605 Students with Special Needs 
ED 685 Research in the Schools, or 
ED 689 Research Design (2 credits) 

Final Program Requirements 

ED 690 Research Project (1-3 credits), or 
ED 691 Capstone Project (1-3 credits) 

ED 697D/E/F Residency I, II, III 
(2-6 credits) 

Accreditation application to the Board of 
Governors for Higher Education, State of 
Connecticut, for the sixth year diploma in 
school administration is in process at the 
time of catalog printing. 

Additional Information 

Inquiries regarding additional details of 
the education program(s), examination and 
testing requirements, procedures for 
certification applications (both in Connecti- 
cut and out of state), enrollment in 
nondegree status and course waiver or 
transfer should be directed to the program 
coordinator and the department office. 

Electrical Engineering 

Coordinator: Bouzid Aliane, Associate 
Professor of Electrical and Computer 



Engineering, Ph.D., Polytechnic Institute 
of New York. 

The master's program in electrical 
engineering allows students to advance 
their knowledge beyond the baccalaureate 
degree in communications systems, com- 
puter engineering, control systems, digital 
signal processing, fiber optics or power 
systems engineering. Beyond the set of 
required courses listed in the following 
program description, students plan an 
individual program of study with a faculty 
adviser whose professional interests match 
those of the student. 

Currently, faculty research interests 
include analog and digital communication 
systems, control systems, digital design, 
digital signal processing, electrical ma- 
chmes, electrical power distribution, power 
systems, electrical power transmission, 
electronic circuit design, fiber optics, analog 
and digital filters, fuzzy systems, discrete 
and continuous linear and nonlinear 
systems, microprocessor-based design and 
optical sensors. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission to the electri- 
cal engineering program are expected to 
have an undergraduate degree from a 
program accredited by the Accreditation 
Board for Engineering Technology, or 
demonstrated equivalent, showing a strong 
record with a "B" average or better. In some 
instances, students who do not meet the 
above criteria may be considered for 
admission on the basis of evaluation of their 
current status, goals and potential for 
success in the program. Such students may 
be required to undertake additional 
coursework in order to complete the degree 
requirements. Applicants are urged to 
submit Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) scores to provide additional informa- 
tion for the admissions decision. Two letters 
of recommendation from individuals 
familiar with the applicant's potential for 
graduate study are also required. 

A student need not be admitted to the 
program in order to enroll in an individual 
course; however, approval should be 
obtained from the course instructor. 



Academic Programs 71 

Courses completed prior to achieving 
official admission to the program may be 
applied to the degree requirements with the 
approval of the program coordinator. 

Transfer Credit 

The transfer of graduate credit from 
other institutions may be permitted with 
the approval of the program coordinator 
and subject to the Graduate School policy 
on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this 
catalog. 

Research Project/Thesis 
Requirement 

Students may elect to undertake a thesis 
for partial fulfillment (six or nine credits) of 
the requirements for the degree provided 
they have at least a 3.2 QPR or a strong 
endorsement from their adviser. The thesis 
must show ability to organize materials in a 
clear and original manner and present well- 
reasoned conclusions. Thesis preparation 
and submission must comply with the 
Graduate School policy on theses as well as 
specific department requirements. Detailed 
information concerning these requirements 
is available from the department office. 

Students who do not elect to undertake 
thesis work must complete a research 
project (EE 690) within the elective portion 
of the program. 

M.S., Electrical Engineering 

A total of 36 graduate credit hours is 
required for completion of the degree of 
master of science in electrical engineering. 
The M.S. in electrical engineering is struc- 
tured into two options, namely, electrical 
engineering and computer engineering. 
Candidates must complete the specific 
requirements for the degree /option selected 
by the student. Students may be required to 
take additional courses if, in the adviser's 
opinion, their background is not appropri- 
ate for the curriculum or option selected. 

Option I: Electrical Engineering 

This option is designed for students who 
wish to focus their study in communication 
systems, control systems, digital signal 



72 

processing, fiber optics or power systems. 
In addition to the four required courses, 
eight electives are chosen in consultation 
with the student's adviser. 

Required Courses 

One mathematics course* 

Plus the following: 

EE 603 Discrete and Continuous Systems I 
EE 604 Discrete and Continuous Systems II 
EE 650 Random Signal Analysis 
Approved Electives (eight courses) 
Total credits: 36 

*Selection of the required mathematics course must be made 
with the approval of the academic adviser. Students may not 
take M 610 or M 616 for credit in this degree option. 

Elective Courses 

EE 605 Computer Controlled Systems 
EE 606 Robot Control 
EE 634/635 Digital Signal Processing I/II 
EE 637/638 Power Systems Engineering I/II 
EE 645 Introduction to Communication 

Systems 
EE 646/647 Digital Communications I/II 
EE 652 Design of Digital Filters 
EE 658 Microprocessors — Theory and 

Applications 
EE 670 Selected Topics 
EE 680 Fiber Optic Communications 
EE 681 Lightwave Technology 
EE 685 Optimization of Engineering 

Systems 
EE 690 Research Project 
EE 695 Independent Study 
EE 697/698/699 Thesis I, II and III 

With the approval of the academic 
adviser, two of the elective courses may be 
taken in other disciplines of mathematics, 
engineering, physics or computer science. 

Option II: Computer Engineering 

Working electrical engineers with 
B.S.E.E. degrees find an increasing amount 
of their job time devoted to projects related 
to computer engineering. Almost any 
system or instrument now contains an 
embedded computer along with its own 
operating system and software, which in 
many cases are written and maintained by 



electrical engineers. This option seeks to 
help these engineers cope with this shift by 
offering more graduate work in the com- 
puter engineering area under the M.S.E.E. 
degree program. 

Required Courses 

CS 610 Intermediate Programming/C 

CS 620 Data Structures 

CS 642 Computer Networks and Data 

Communication 
CS 644 Operating Systems 
EE 603 Discrete and Continuous Systems I 
EE 650 Random Signal Analysis 
EE 658 Microprocessors — Theory and 

Applications 
EE 682 Computer Architecture 
EE 690 Research Project* 
Approved electives (three courses) 
Total credits: 36 

*Students who elect to write a thesis will register for EE 
697 and 698 Thesis I and II in lieu ofEE 690 and one of the 
elective courses in the program. 

Elective Courses 

CS 640B Parallel Computer Architectures 

CS 650 Computer Graphics 

CS 662 Expert Systems 

CS 664 Neural Networks 

EE 604 Discrete and Continuous Systems II 

EE 605 Computer Controlled Systems 

EE 606 Robot Control 

EE 620 Fuzzy Logic and Control 

EE 630/631 Electronic Instrumentation I/II 

EE 634/635 Digital Signal Processing I/II 

EE 637/638 Power Systems Engineering I/II 

EE 639 Electric Power Distribution 

EE 645 Introduction to Communication 

Systems 
EE 646/647 Digital Communications I/II 
EE 652 Design of Digital Filters 
EE 670 Selected Topics 
EE 680 Fiber Optic Communications 
EE 681 Lightwave Technology 
EE 685 Optimization of Engineering 

Systems 
EE 695 Independent Study 
EE 697/698/699 Thesis I, II and III 
M 615 Linear Mathematics and 



Combinatorics 

With the approval of the academic 
adviser, students may select other courses 
in mathematics, engineering, physics or 
computer science. 

Environmental 



Engineering 



Coordinator: David J. Wall, Professor of 
Civil and Environmental Engineering, 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

The program in environmental engineer- 
ing is designed to prepare engineers for 
successful and dynamic careers in the 
continuously expanding field of environ- 
mental engineering. Due to its interdiscipli- 
nary nature, the program allows students to 
take a combination of courses in related 
areas. 

In a rapidly changing and increasingly 
interconnected world, pollution problems 
have brought about increased individual 
and public awareness. Environmental 
engineering has expanded rapidly to 
include areas such as water and air pollu- 
tion, groundwater contamination, solid and 
hazardous waste management, and indus- 
trial waste treatment. A wide array of 
employment opportunities exists for 
environmental engineers in federal, state 
and local government as well as in the 
industrial and private sectors. 

This program provides the advanced 
educational skills necessary to meet the 
ever-changing needs and challenges of the 
field. It is designed to offer vigorous, 
professionally oriented courses, case 
studies, new technology and research 
developments. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission to the master's 
degree program in environmental engineer- 
ing are expected to have a grade point 
average of 3.0 or better (on a 4.0 scale) in 
their undergraduate major coursework and 
hold a baccalaureate degree in civil or 
environmental engineering from a program 



Academic Programs 73 

accredited by the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology (ABET), or 
from a program with a demonstrated 
equivalent accreditation. Applications from 
candidates with an ABET or equivalent 
engineering degree in an area of study 
outside of civil/environmental engineering 
with a minimum undergraduate grade 
point average of 3.0 will be considered. 
However, such students may be required to 
complete certain undergraduate civil/ 
environmental engineering courses as a 
condition of acceptance. Applicants are 
urged to submit scores from the Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE) general test to 
aid in the evaluation process. 

In general, engineering students who do 
not meet the above criteria and students 
with nonengineering undergraduate 
degrees will not be considered candidates 
for admission. However, a potential candi- 
date who does not meet the admission 
criteria may, in consultation with and with 
the approval of the department chairperson, 
pursue a program of study which may 
include a sequence of undergraduate 
courses to satisfy deficiencies. Only after 
the completion of such a program of study 
will the student be considered for admis- 
sion to the graduate program in environ- 
mental engineering. 

M.S., Environmental 
Engineering 

A total of 39 credit hours, 12 three-credit 
courses plus a three-credit research project, 
must be completed to earn the master of 
science degree in environmental engineer- 
ing. Nine courses, exclusive of the research 
project, must be selected from courses 
designated as environmental engineering. 
Three courses may be selected from outside 
the environmental engineering department. 
Enrollment in non-environmental engineer- 
ing courses, other than those listed below as 
approved non-environmental engineering 
electives, requires approval of the program 
coordinator. Transfer credit from other 
institutions will be permitted subject to the 
Graduate School policy on transfer credit 
detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 



74: 

Required Courses 

Approved Environmental Engineering 

Courses (9 courses) 
CE 690 Research Project 
Approved Electives (3 courses) 
Total credits: 39 

Concentrations in Environmental 

Engineering 

Students may elect to pursue a sequence 
of courses in one of three areas of concen- 
tration, or they may tailor a program of 
study to meet the individual's specific 
needs or objectives within the constraints of 
the program. At the time of admission to 
the program, each student is assigned a 
faculty adviser who will assist the student 
in formulating a program of study and 
identifying an appropriate research project. 

Concentration in Water Resources 



Suggested Courses 

CE 601 Physical-Chemical Treatment of 

Aqueous Wastes 
CE 602 Biological Treatment of Aqueous 

Wastes 
CE 603 Contaminant Fate and Transport in 

the Environment 
CE 606 Environmental Law and Legislation 
CE 610 Pollution Prevention Management 

Technologies 
CE 612 Advanced Wastewater Treatment 
CE 613 Industrial Wastewater Control 
CE 617 Wastewater Residuals Management 
CE 690 Research Project 
CH 601 Environmental Chemistry 
Approved Electives (three courses) 
Total credits: 39 

Concentration in Industrial and 
Hazardous Wastes 



Concentration Adviser: Jean Nocito-Gobel, 
Assistant Professor of Civil and 
Environmental Engineering, M.S., Ohio 
State University 

Suggested Courses 

CE 603 Contaminant Fate and Transport in 

the Environment 
CE 606 Environmental Law and Legislation 
CE 614 Surface Water Quality Management 
CE 615 Groundwater Hydrology 
CE 616 Contaminant Hydrology 
CE 620 Engineering Hydrology 
CE 621 Advanced Hydrology 
CE 623 Open Channel Hydraulics 
CE 624 Computer Applications in 

Hydrology /and Hydraulics 
CE 690 Research Project 
Approved Electives (three courses) 
Total credits: 39 

Concentration in Water and 
Wastewater Treatment 

Concentration Adviser: Agamemnon D. 
Koutsospyros, Associate Professor of 
Civil and Environmental Engineering, 
Ph.D., Polytechnic University 



Concentration Adviser: Agamemnon D. 
Koutsospyros, Associate Professor of 
Civil and Environmental Engineering, 
Ph.D., Polytechnic University 

Suggested Courses 

CE 601 Physical-Chemical Treatment of 

Aqueous Wastes 
CE 602 Biological Treatment of Aqueous 

Wastes 
CE 603 Contaminant Fate and Transport in 

the Environment 
CE 605 Solid Waste Management 
CE 606 Environmental Law and Legislation 
CE 610 Pollution Prevention Management 

Technologies 
CE 613 Industrial Wastewater Control 
CE 618 Hazardous Waste Treatment 
CE 661 Air Pollution Fundamentals 
CE 690 Research Project 
CM 622 Air Pollution Control 
Approved Electives (three courses) 
Total credits: 39 

Non-Environmental Engineering 
Electives* 

E 659 Writing and Speaking for 
Professionals 



EN 600 Environmental Geoscience 

EN 602 Environmental Effects of Pollutants 

EN 607 Environmental Reports and Impact 

Assessment 
EN 618 Hazardous Materials Management 
EN 640 Introduction to Geographical 

Information Systems 
EN 641 Geographical Information System 

Techniques and Applications I 
EN 642 Geographical Information System 

Techniques and Applications II 
M 620 Numerical Analysis 

*Other courses may be taken as electives with the written 
approval of the program coordinator. 

See page 109 for the certificate in civil 
engineering design. 

Environmental Science 

Coordinator: Roman N. Zajac, Associate 
Professor of Biology and Environmental 
Science, Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

The purpose of this program is to 
provide graduate-level education for 
careers in environmental science as well as 
for other areas requiring knowledge of 
environmental principles. It is intended to 
meet the needs of those who wish to enter 
this dynamic and expanding field, those 
who are active environmental scientists and 
managers, and also those students who plan 
to pursue graduate training beyond the 
master's level. An interdisciplinary pro- 
gram comprised of courses in ecology, 
geology, chemistry and legislation, it 
provides the advanced skills and knowl- 
edge necessary to meet the increasing 
demand for scientists with an environmen- 
tal background. Field and laboratory work 
provide practical experience for students 
enrolled in the program, while ongoing 
faculty projects provide opportunities to 
perform research on various environmental 
problems and issues. 

Scientists knowledgeable in environmen- 
tal issues and science are needed by 
employers in these major areas: 

• government agencies, particularly in the 
areas of environmental protection and 
management; 



Academic Programs 75 

• water, sewer and power-generation 
utilities; 

• analytic laboratories; 

• environmental and engineering firms; 

• industries in the field of pollution 
control; and 

• private industry and management. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission to the environ- 
mental science program are expected to 
have a bachelor's degree in the sciences that 
included courses in biology, general chem- 
istry, organic chemistry and calculus. Also 
suggested are a course in introductory 
statistics and a course in physics. Students 
who do not hold a bachelor's degree in 
science and /or who lack the minimum 
program prerequisite requirements will be 
required to complete them before enrolling 
in certain specific graduate courses as 
determined in consultation with the pro- 
gram coordinator. 

It is expected that all prerequisites will 
be completed either prior to enrolling in 
graduate courses or within one year of 
admission into the program. This period 
can be extended only with the consent of 
the program coordinator. Students who 
must take a course in organic chemistry as a 
program prerequisite may choose to take 
CH 600 Introduction to Environmental 
Chemistry to fulfill this requirement. It 
should be noted, however, that CH 600 
Introduction to Environmental Chemistry is 
taken on an excess credit basis and will not 
be counted towards fulfilling the program 
requirement of 42 graduate credits. 

M.S., Environmental Science 

A total of 42 credit hours must be 
completed to earn the master of science in 
environmental science degree. The transfer 
of credit earned at other institutions will be 
permitted subject to the Graduate School 
policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere 
in this catalog. 

The program consists of five required 
core courses plus an additional nine courses 
that may be taken in a specified area of 
concentration. Students who do not choose 



76 



to concentrate in a particular area may 
follow a general plan of study developed in 
consultation with the program coordinator. 
Required courses cover common areas in 
environmental science, while the electives 
and concentration options enable students 
to study in a particular area of interest and/ 
or subjects with direct application to their 
current professional situations. 

Students may elect to write a thesis as 
part of the program of study. Thesis prepa- 
ration and submission must comply with 
the Graduate School policy on theses as 
well as all specific department require- 
ments. A thesis is recommended for stu- 
dents who wish to pursue doctoral training 
after graduation and for those with specific 
professional interests. For students who 
choose the thesis option, the selection of 
thesis courses will be determined in consul- 
tation with the program coordinator and 
thesis adviser and will include EN 698 and 
699 Thesis I and II in lieu of other courses in 
the program. 

Students should note that a number of 
courses in this program require some 
weekend field trips, lab sessions and /or 
acceptable alternatives. In addition, stu- 
dents should consult the program coordina- 
tor for advice in selection of appropriate 
courses and to assure compliance with 
prerequisite requirements. 

Required Courses 

CE 606 Environmental Law and Legislation 

CH 601 Environmental Chemistry 

EN 600 Environmental Geoscience 

EN 601 Principles of Ecology 

EN 690 Research Project* 

Concentration, or Approved Electives (nine 

courses) 
Total credits: 42 

*Students will select a topic in their area of concentration 
for completion of EN 690 Research Project. 

Note: Students who select the general 
program rather than a concentration in a 
specific area will be required to follow a 
plan of study determined in consultation 
with the program coordinator. 



Concentrations 

Students may elect to pursue one of the 
following four specific concentrations for 
the elective portion of the program. As 
students declare a concentration, they will 
be assigned to the faculty adviser respon- 
sible for the specified concentration. The 
concentration adviser will help the student 
formulate an individual program and the 
required approved electives, which must be 
selected from at least two other concentra- 
tion areas. 

Concentration in 
Environmental Ecology 

Concentration Adviser: Roman N. Zajac, 
Associate Professor of Biology and 
Environmental Science, Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut 

EN 602 Environmental Effects of Pollutants 

EN 606 Environmental Data Analysis 

EN 607 Environmental Reports and Impact 

Assessment 
EN 615 Toxicology 
Restricted Electives (two courses, from two 

other concentrations) 

Plus three of the following:** 

EN 603 Terrestrial and Wetland Ecology 

EN 604 Ecology of Inland Waters 

EN 605 Marine and Estuarine Ecology 

EN 608 Landscape Ecology 

EN 621 Hydrology (4 credits) 

EN 650 Environmental Microbiology 

EN 670 Selected Topics 

Total credits: 27-28 

Concentration in 
Environmental Geoscience 

Concentration Adviser: R. Laurence Davis, 
Professor of Earth and Environmental 
Science, Ph.D., University of Rochester 

EN 621 Hydrology (4 credits) 

EN 622 Groundwater Geology (4 credits) 

EN 632 Field Geology of the Northeast 

(4 credits), or 

EN 633 Selected Topics in Field Geology 

(1-4 credits) 



Restricted Electives (two courses, from two 
other concentrations) 

Plus four of the following:** 

EN 617 Subsurface Assessment 

EN 620 Advanced Environmental Geology 

(4 credits) 
EN 625 Geomorphology (4 credits) 
EN 626 Glacial Geology 
EN 627 Soil Science 
EN 670 Selected Topics 
Total credits: 28-30 

Concentration in 
Environmental Health and 
Management 

Concentration Adviser. Roman N. Zajac, 
Associate Professor of Biology and 
Environmental Science, Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut 

EN 607 Environmental Reports and Impact 

Assessment 
EN 615 Toxicology 
EN 617 Subsurface Assessment 
EN 618 Hazardous Materials Management 
Restricted Electives (two courses, from two 

other concentrations) 

Plus three of the following:** 

CE 605 Solid Waste Management 

EN 602 Environmental Effects of Pollutants 

EN 610 Environmental Health 

EN 612 Epidemiology 

EN 613 Radioactivity and Radiation in the 

Environment 
EN 616 Human Health and Environmental 

Risk Assessment 
EN 670 Selected Topics 
SH 608 Industrial Hygiene Practices 
SH 620 Occupational Safety and Health Law 
Total credits: 27 

Concentration in Geographical 
Information Systems and 
Applications 

Concentration Adviser: Michael P. Prisloe, 
Jr., Practitioner-in-Residence, Biology 
and Environmental Science, M.S., 



Academic Programs 77 

University of New Haven 

EN 640 Introduction to Geographical 
Information Systems 

EN 641 Geographical Information System 
Techniques and Applications I 

EN 642 Geographical Information System 
Techniques and Applications II 

EN 643 Application of GIS in Environmen- 
tal Science 

Restricted Electives (two courses, from two 
other concentrations) 

Plus three of the following:** 

EN 608 Landscape Ecology 

EN 620 Advanced Environmental Geology 

(4 credits) 
EN 625 Geomorphology (4 credits) 
EN 670 Selected Topics 
Total credits: 27-29 

See page 111 for the certificate in geo- 
graphical information systems. 

**Other courses may be substituted with the approval of the 
concentration adviser/program coordinator. Courses in 
environmental engineering, chemistry, occupational safety 
and health, and/or computer science may also be approved 
as electives. 

Executive Master 
of Business 
Administration 
(Executive M.B.A) 

Director: James E. Shapiro, J.D., State 
University of New York at Buffalo 
School of Law 

The Executive Master of Business 
Administration program offered by the 
School of Business is a fully accredited, 
graduate-level degree program designed for 
middle- and upper-level managers who 
have acquired significant managerial 
experience. Applicants are required to hold 
a baccalaureate degree from an accredited 
institution. The Executive M.B.A. degree is 
conferred upon completion of a two-year 
graduate program organized to meet the 
education needs of busy professionals 



78 



within the time constraints and responsibili- 
ties imposed by their jobs. Individual 
participation is emphasized through class 
discussions, interaction and cooperation 
with other executives in the class. Small 
class size enables this interaction. 

Executive M.B.A. classes are offered at 
the main campus in West Haven and in 
downtown Stamford. Each class progresses 
through the program as a group, thus 
providing an opportunity for a two-year 
relationship with other professionals for the 
continuing exchange of ideas and infor- 
mation. 

No transfer credit is accepted for admis- 
sion to the Executive M.B.A. program. 
Admission to the Executive M.B.A. program 
is by a special application available from the 
Director. No GMAT is required. 

Prospective candidates are encouraged 
to apply as early as possible. Classes are 
limited to 25 students. New classes of the 
Executive M.B.A. program begin in Septem- 
ber and January of each year. The admission 
procedure includes a screening interview 
with the Director and review of the 
applicant's credentials by the Selection 
Committee. Each candidate is considered on 
the basis of the special application form, 
official transcripts from all undergraduate 
and graduate schools attended, two busi- 
ness-related letters of recommendation and 
a letter of organizational support. 

The Executive M.B.A. program invites 
both individual and employer-sponsored 
applications. Information and applications 
for the Executive M.B.A. program are 
available from the Office of the Executive 
M.B.A. Director, Room 200, Echlin Hall, 
(203) 932-7386. 

Executive M.B.A. 

The program consists of 20 modules 
scheduled into two, ten-month academic 
calendar years. Each module is four ses- 
sions in length and has a value of 1.5 
credits. All classes meet from 3 to 8 p.m. one 
weekday each week in designated confer- 
ence facilities. Participants must agree in 
advance to attend all classes except for 
emergencies. Students must be prepared to 



devote significant additional time for class 
preparation and reading assignments. 

Modules 

First Year 

EXID 903 The Communication Process 
EXID 960 Information Management 
EXID 906 The Management Process 
EXID 912 Financial Accounting 
EXID 930 Marketing Practice 
EXID 915 Quantitative Decision Making 
EXID 918 Managerial Economics 
EXID 954 Organizational Development 
EXID 933 Managing the Global Marketplace 
EXID 942 Managerial Accounting 

Second Year 

EXID 939 Operations Management 
EXID 924 Financial Management I 
EXID 927 Financial Management II 
EXID 945 Human Resources Management 
EXID 948 Labor and Management Relations 
EXID 909 Business and Government 

Relations 
EXID 951 Marketing Management 
EXID 957 Corporate Policy and Strategy 
EXID 999 Special Research Topics 
EXID 921 Executive Leadership Seminar 
Total credits: 30 

Finance and Financial 
Services 

Coordinator: Robert M. Rainish, Professor 
of Finance, Ph.D., City University of 
New York 

The program of study leading to the 
master of science in finance and financial 
services provides students with the concep- 
tual foundations and analytic techniques for 
a career in finance. Students have an option 
to select one of three concentration areas to 
prepare for professional certification 
examinations. The concentrations allow 
students to specialize in: Personal Financial 
Planning, preparing students for the CFP 
examination; Financial Services Manage- 
ment, preparing students for the CFA 
examination; or Corporate Financial Man- 
agement, preparing students for the CFM 
examination. The concentrations enable 
students to design a program to meet their 
personal objectives. 



The program provides training for 
current and prospective professionals in the 
financial community, particularly the 
financial services and corporate finance 
sectors. The areas served specifically by the 
M.S. in Finance and Financial Services 
degree include: 



banking, 

investment companies, 
finance and credit companies, 
insurance companies, 
financial consulting, 
accountants and accounting firms, 
corporate management. 
Chartered Financial Analysts, 
Certified Financial Planners, and 
Certified Financial Management. 



Students who complete the program, in 
addition to being awarded an advanced 
degree, will have the opportunity to work 
toward earning professional certification 
(CFA, CFP, CFM) from nationally accredited 
and recognized associations. Additional 
information concerning professional 
certification may be obtained from the 
finance coordinator. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission to the pro- 
gram are expected to hold a baccalaureate 
degree from an accredited institution. 
Applicants lacking adequate background in 
accounting, economics, finance and /or 
quantitative techniques may be required to 
enroll in additional coursework to satisfy 
prerequisite requirements. Admission is 
based primarily on an applicant's under- 
graduate record. Applicants may submit 
scores from the Graduate Management 
Admissions Test (GMAT) in support of their 
applications. 

M.S., Finance and Financial 
Services 

A total of 42 graduate credit hours (up to 
12 credits may be waived) is required for 
completion of the master of science in 
finance and financial services. The program 
consists of four foundation courses and four 



Academic Programs 79 

core courses, plus selection and completion 
of six concentration courses. 

Required Courses 

Foundation Courses 

A 630 Topics in Corporate Financial -^ 

Reporting 
EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 
FI 601 Finance 
QA 604 Probability and Statistics 

Core Courses 

FI 605 Data Evaluation and Modeling /"^ 
C\ FI 610 Capital Market Theory, 
FI 611 Equity Market Valuation and / 
Analysis 
p< FI 620 Capital Markets and the Valuation of 
Fixed Income Securities 
Concentration (six courses) 
Total credits: 42 

Concentration in Personal 
Financial Planning 
(CFP Option) 

FI 640 Introduction to Financial Planning 
FI 641 Risk Management Through 

Insurance 
FI 642 Valuation of Employee Benefit Plans 
FI 643 Tax Issues in Financial Planning 
FI 644 Estate Issues in Financial Planning 
FI 645 Seminar: CFP Review and Research 

Project 
Total credits: 18 

Concentration in Financial 
Services Management 
(CFA Option) 

A 654 Financial Statements: Reporting and ^ 

Analysis 
A^FI 612 Applied Portfolio Management ' 
FI 625 Advanced Capital Market Issues -^ 
Restricted electives (three courses approved 

by program coordinator) -^ 
Total credits: 18 

Concentration in Corporate 
Financial Management 



80 

(CFM Option) 

A 654 Financial Statements: Reporting and 

Analysis 
A 661 Managerial Accounting Seminar / 
FI 602 Corporate Valuation and Business / 

Strategy 
FI 630 Corporate Financial Analysis and 

Applications 
FI 635 Advanced Corporate Financial 

Management Issues 
Restricted elective (one course approved by 

program coordinator) 
Total credits: 18 

See page 50 for the M.B.A. concentration 
in finance and page 110 for the certificate in 
finance. 

Fire Science 

Director: Robert G. Sawyer, Associate 
Professor of Fire Science, M.S., 
University of New Haven 

Fire science is an interdisciplinary 
master's program designed to provide 
advanced training for fire service, fire 
safety, occupational safety and security 
professionals who are involved with fire 
protection. 

Fire protection specialists require 
knowledge of the science and methodology 
for preserving lives and property by pre- 
venting or minimizing losses resulting from 
fires, explosions, accidents and other 
hazards. 

Current national needs indicate that 
trained fire protection specialists are in 
extremely limited supply. Initial job oppor- 
tunities in the insurance field, industry and 
government service may involve applica- 
tions engineering, research and product 
design, building and systems design, fire 
hazard analysis, and marketing of equip- 
ment or insurance. 

The fire science program and courses 
cover a wide range of problems including 
the proper design, arrangement and use of 
building materials; analysis of fire and 
explosion hazards; safe design of industrial 
processes; management of industrial loss 



control and insurance programs; and safe 
design, selection and handling of equip- 
ment and materials. Training is provided in 
the application of fire protection principles 
to fire department, water supply and 
building code aspects of community 
planning. 

As this catalog goes to press, the univer- 
sity is in the process of opening a West 
Coast satellite master's program in fire 
science at Sacramento, California. Planned 
for start-up in January 1998 at Sacramento, 
the university's fire science programs are 
anticipated to have future sites in the bay 
area of San Francisco and the Los Angeles 
basin. 

M.S., Fire Science 

Candidates are required to complete 39 
credit hours of graduate work, which may 
include an internship in fire science. Trans- 
fer credit from other institutions may be 
permitted subject to the Graduate School 
policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere 
in this catalog. 

Students in the fire science degree 
program are required to complete the 
required core courses, a concentration in 
either administration or technology and 9 
credits of electives. Students must take 
either FS 690 Research Seminar or FS 693 
Internship. A six-credit thesis may replace 
one elective and the research seminar or 
internship requirement. 

Students electing to write a thesis must 
register for thesis credit with the depart- 
ment. The thesis must show the ability to 
organize material in a clear and original 
manner and present well-reasoned conclu- 
sions. Thesis preparation and submission 
must comply with Graduate School policy 
on theses as well as specific department 
requirements. 

Required Courses 

FS 625 Chemistry of Fires and Explosions 
FS 666 Seminar on Industrial Fire Protection 
FS 667 Fire and Building Codes, Standards 

and Practices 
FS 668 Fire and Casualty Insurance 

Practices 



FS 669 Dynamics, Evaluation and Preven- 
tion of Structural Fires 

FS 690 Research Seminar, or 
FS 693 Internship 

Concentration (four courses) 

Electives (three courses) 

Total credits: 39 

Concentration in 
Administration 

CS 602 Computing Fundamentals 

MG 637 Management 

PA 602 Public Policy Formulation and 

Implementation 
PA 620 Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public 

Sector 
Total credits: 12 

Concentration in Technology 

FS 661 Systems Approach to Fire Safety I 
FS 662 Systems Approach to Fire Safety II 
Fire Science Electives (2 courses) 
Total credits: 12 

Elective Courses 

CJ 676 Security Management Seminar 
CJ 677 Private Security in Modem Society 
CO 621 Managerial Communication 
FS 649 Fire Scene Investigation and Arson 

Analysis (4 credits) 
FS 664 Terrorism 
FS 665 Legal Aspects of Fire and Arson 

Investigation 
FS 681 Seminar /Research Project in Public 

Safety Management I 
FS 682 Seminar /Research Project in Public 

Safety Management II 
FS 683 Seminar/Research Project on Com- 
parative Public Safety Systems 
FS 684 Fire /Accident Scene Reconstruction 
FS 690 Research Seminar 
FS 698/699 Thesis I and II 
P 619 Organizational Behavior 
P 670 Selected Topics 
SH 602 Safety Organization and 

Administration 
SH 620 Occupational Safety and Health 

Law 
SO 610 Urban Sociology 
SO 620 Sociology of Bureaucracy 

In addition, approved courses from the 



Academic Programs 81 

departments of fire science, criminal justice, 
forensic science, industrial engineering, 
management or political science may be 
taken as electives with the consent of the 
program director. 

See pages 108, 110 and 111 for the 
certificates in fire science. 

Forensic Science 

Director: Howard A. Harris, Associate 

Professor of Forensic Science, Ph.D., Yale 
University; J.D., St. Louis University 

Forensic science is a broad, interdiscipli- 
nary field in which the natural sciences are 
employed to analyze and evaluate physical 
evidence in matters of the law. The Interdis- 
ciplinary forensic science program has these 
concentrations: criminalistics, fire science 
and advanced investigation. In addition to 
the M.S. degree programs, professional 
certificates are offered in all the specialties 
for those who require only the specialized 
courses. The criminalistics concentration 
provides the advanced technical back- 
ground for professional laboratory examin- 
ers and those wishing to enter the 
criminalistics field. 

The fire science concentration provides 
advanced training in arson scene investiga- 
tion, laboratory analysis of arson-related 
evidence and related aspects of arson and 
fire investigation. The advanced investiga- 
tion concentration provides advanced 
training in the forensic sciences and in 
investigation techniques, and is designed 
for students interested in identification, 
crime-scene, investigative and other related 
work. 

The program and courses stress not only 
up-to-date analytic and scientific methods, 
but also a broad understanding of the 
concepts underlying the forensic sciences. 
Degree programs in forensic science require 
a sequence of core courses, followed by 
concentration requirement courses and a 
flexible offering of electives designed to 
meet individual needs. 

As this catalog goes to press, the univer- 
sity is in the process of opening a West 
Coast satellite master's program in forensic 



82 

science at Sacramento, California. The 
forensic science program concentrations in 
advanced investigation and in fire science 
are expected to begin classes in September 

1997. 

Admission Policy 

Because the admissions criteria differ, at 
the time of initial application students must 
specify which one of the three concentra- 
tions they plan to pursue. 

For admission to the criminalistics 
concentration in the M.S. in forensic science 
program, students must have an under- 
graduate degree in a natural science (chem- 
istry, biology or physics) from an accredited 
institution. Applicants should have taken at 
least one year of general chemistry with lab, 
one year of organic chemistry with lab and 
one semester of quantitative analysis 
(analytic chemistry) with lab. A semester of 
qualitative organic analysis with lab, a 
semester of biochemistry with lab and a 
year of physics with lab are highly recom- 
mended. Applications will be strengthened 
by an overall undergraduate grade average 
of at least 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) and grades of 
"B" or better in science and mathematics 
courses. Applicants for the criminalistics 
concentration are required to take the 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 
General Test and submit their scores to the 
Graduate School prior to the acceptance 
decision. Applications will be strengthened 
by verbal scores falling at or above the 50th 
percentile and by quantitative /analytical 
scores falling at or above the 70th percentile. 

For admission to the advanced investiga- 
tion or fire science concentrations in the M.S. 
in forensic science program, students must 
have earned a baccalaureate degree from an 
accredited institution. The degree need not 
be in the natural sciences, and the GRE is 
not required. Applications will be strength- 
ened by natural science coursework and by 
overall undergraduate average of at least 
3.0 (on a 4.0 scale). 

All applications must be accompanied 
by two letters of recommendation. Applica- 
tions will be strengthened by letters from 
recommenders familiar with the applicant's 
academic skills, performance and promise. 
Typically, such recommenders will be either 



current or former professors and /or aca- 
demic advisers. 

All applications should be accompanied 
by a short (no more than one page) state- 
ment that addresses the basis of the 
applicant's interest in forensic science as 
well as personal and professional goals and 
how completion of this degree program is 
expected to further those goals. 

Admission to the forensic science 
program will be granted for the Fall trimes- 
ter only. The application deadline for the 
forensic science program will be once each 
year, on February 15 for the following Fall 
trimester. Applicants may expect an admis- 
sions decision no later than the middle of 
March in the year for which they have 
applied. 

M.S., Forensic Science 

Candidates are required to complete 40 
credit hours of graduate work. Transfer of 
credit from other institutions may be 
permitted subject to the Graduate School 
policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere 
in this catalog. At the time of application to the 
forensic science program, applicants must 
specify one of the three areas of concentration. 

Thesis 

Students may elect to write a thesis in lieu 
of CJ 686 Forensic Science Research Project 1/ 
CJ 688 Forensic Science Internship I and three 
credits of elective coursework. Registration 
for a minimum of six thesis credits (CJ 697, CJ 
698) would be required. The thesis must show 
an ability to organize material in a clear and 
original manner and present well-reasoned 
conclusions. Thesis preparation and submis- 
sion must comply with the Graduate School 
policy on theses as well as all specific 
department requirements. 

Required Courses 

CJ 614 Survey of Forensic Science 

CJ 620 Advanced Criminalistics I 

CJ 640 Advanced Criminalistics II 

CJ 653 Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 

CJ 673 Biomedical Methods in Forensic 

Science 
CJ 686 Forensic Science Research Project I, 



or CJ 688 Forensic Science Internship I 
Concentration (22 credits) 
Total credits: 40 

Elective Courses 

CJ 608 Law and Evidence 

CJ 610 Administration of Justice 

CJ 670 Selected Topics 

CJ 675 Private Security Law 

CJ 676 Security Management Seminar 

CJ 677 Private Security in Modem Society 

CJ 695 Independent Study 

SH 602 Safety Organization and 

Administration 
SH 615 Toxicology 

SH 620 Occupational Safety and Health Law 
SH 630 Product Safety and Liability 

In addition, other concentration courses 
(in lists from which one, two or more must 
be taken) may be taken as electives. Courses 
listed as requirements for one of the concen- 
trations may be taken as electives for other 
concentrations with the permission of the 
director of the program. 

Concentration in Advanced 
Investigation 

CJ 616 Advanced Crime Scene Investigation 
CJ 632 Advanced Investigation I 
CJ 633 Advanced Investigation II 
Electives (three courses, 10 credits) 

Plus one of the following: 

CJ 608 Law and Evidence 
CJ 651 Criminal Procedure 
PS 605 Criminal Law 
Total credits: 22 

Concentration in 
Criminalistics 

CJ 621 Advanced Criminalistics I Labora- 
tory (1 credit) 

CJ 641 Advanced Criminalistics II Labora- 
tory (1 credit) 

CJ 654 Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 
Laboratory (1 credit) 

CJ 674 Biomedical Methods in Forensic 
Science Laboratory (1 credit) 

Electives (10-12 credits) 



Academic Programs 83 
Plus two of the following: 

CH 621 Chemical Forensic Analysis with 

Laboratory (4 credits) 
CH 631 Advances in Analytic Chemistry 
CJ 645 Drug Chemistry and Identification 
CJ 660 Forensic Microscopy (4 credits) 
CJ 661 Medicolegal Investigation and 

Identification 
CJ 662 Forensic Toxicology (4 credits) 
CJ 663 Advanced Forensic Serology I (4 

credits) 
CJ 664 Advanced Forensic Serology II (4 

credits) 
Total credits: 22 

Concentration in Fire Science 

CH 625 Chemistry of Fires and Explosions 

CJ 649 Fire Scene Investigation and Arson 
Analysis (4 credits) 

CJ 608 Law and Evidence, or CJ 651 Crimi- 
nal Procedure, or FS 665 Legal Aspects of 
Fire and Arson Investigation, or 
PS 605 Criminal Law 

Electives (three courses, 9 credits) 

Plus one of the following: 

CJ 667 Fire and Building Codes, Standards, 
and Practices 

CJ 668 Fire and Casualty Insurance 
Practices 

CJ 669 Dynamics, Evaluation and Preven- 
tion of Structural Fires 

CJ 684 Fire /Accident Scene Reconstruction 

Total credits: 22 

See pages 111 for certificates in forensic 
science. 

Health Care 
Administration 

Coordinator: Charles Coleman, Assistant 
Professor of Public Administration, 
M.P.A., West Virginia University 

This program of study, leading to the 
master of science degree, is designed to give 
students the best possible preparation for 
careers in health care administration. The 
health care field is unique in that it func- 



84 



tions in a highly regulated, yet highly 
competitive environment. The core courses 
in this degree program provide students 
with an appreciation of the past, present 
and future of health care administration. 
The concentrations allow students to 
specialize in long-term care, human re- 
source management in health care, medical 
group management, health care marketing, 
health policy and finance or managed care. 

In addition to earning the advanced 
academic degree, students who complete 
the concentration in long-term care become 
eligible to take the State of Connecticut 
exam for certification as a long-term care 
administrator. 

M.S., Health Care 
Administration 

A total of 42 graduate credit hours is 
required for completion of the master of 
science in health care administration. The 
program consists of nine required courses 
plus five additional courses which may be 
taken as unrestricted electives or may be 
used to complete one of the six concentra- 
tions in the master's program. 

Students entering this program who lack 
adequate preparation in quantitative 
techniques may be required to undertake 
additional study in order to satisfy a 
prerequisite requirement. Adequate prepa- 
ration is defined as satisfactory completion 
of three credit hours of introductory statis- 
tics. 

Required Courses 

MG 630 Management Information Systems 

in Health Care 
MG 640 Management of Health Care 

Organizations 
PA 611 Research Methods 
PA 625 Administrative Behavior, or 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 
PA 641 Financial Management of Health 

Care Organizations 
PA 649 History and Development of Health 

Care Institutions 
PA 651 Health Care Ethics 
PA 690 Research Seminar 



PS 635 Law and Public Health 
Electives or Concentration (5 courses) 
Total credits: 42 

Concentration in Health Care 
Marketing 

CO 623 Communication in Health Care 
CO 631 Public Information Dynamics 
CO 632 Contemporary Public Relations 

Issues 
MK 609 Marketing, or 

MK 641 Marketing Management 
MK 638 Competitive Marketing Strategy 
Total credits: 15 

Concentration in Health Policy 
and Finance 

PA 602 Public Policy Formulation and 

Implementation 
PA 645 Health Care Economics and Finance 
PA 653 Cost Containment in Health Care 

Plus two of the following: 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 

FI 601 Finance 

FI 640 Introduction to Financial Planning 

FI 641 Risk Management Through 

Insurance 
MG 638 Cost Benefit Management 
PA 648 Contemporary Issues in Health Care 
PA 652 Introduction to Managed Care 
PA 657 Health Care Reimbursements 
PS 626 Decision Making in the Political 

Process 
Total credits: 15 

Concentration in Human 
Resource Management in 
Health Care 

MG 645 Management of Human Resources 

Plus four of the following: 

CO 623 Communication in Health Care 
EC 625 Industrial Relations 
P 641 Personnel Development and Training 
P 642 Organizational Change and 

Development 
PA 659 Human Resource Planning in Health 

Care 



PA 662 Recruitment and Retention of Health 

Care Professionals 
Total credits: 15 

Concentration in Long-Term 
Care 

PA 646 Organization and Management of 

Long-Term Care Facilities 
PA 681 Long-Term Health Care Internship I 
PA 682 Long-Term Health Care 

Internship II 

Plus two of the following: 

PA 644 Administration of Programs and 

Services for the Aged 
PS 633 The Political Process and the Aged 
SO 651 Social Gerontology 
Total credits: 15 

Concentration in Managed 
Care 

PA 647 Alternative Health Care Delivery 

Systems 
PA 652 Introduction to Managed Care 
PA 653 Cost Containment in Health Care 

Plus two of the following: 

CO 623 Communication in Health Care 
CO 632 Contemporary Public Relations 

Issues 
MK 609 Marketing 

MK 638 Competitive Marketing Strategy 
Total credits: 15 

Concentration in Medical 
Group Management 

PA 652 Introduction to Managed Care 
PA 657 Health Care Reimbursements 
PA 664 Survey of Medical Group 
Management 

Plus two of the following: 

MG 665 Compensation Administration 
PA 653 Cost Containment in Health Care 
PA 662 Recruitment and Retention of Health 

Care Professionals 
Total credits: 15 



Academic Programs 85 

In addition to the master of science 
program, health care concentrations are 
available in both the M.B.A. and M.P.A. 
programs along with graduate certificates 
in the health care field. See Table of Con- 
tents to locate these other related programs. 

Hospitality and Tourism 

Coordinator: Sherie Brezina, Assistant 
Professor, Tourism and Travel 
Administration, M.A., University of 
Florida 

The master of science in hospitality and 
tourism is a professional degree prograni 
designed for three distinct constituencies: 
(1) individuals seeking to change careers/ 
fields of study, (2) individuals seeking 
advanced career competencies and (3) 
individuals seeking an academic career. 

Key issues facing the hospitality indus- 
try include increasing global competition, 
changing markets, rising costs, and the 
transformation of traditional labor sources. 
As a result, the need for accomplished, 
highly educated managers is greater than 
ever before. In response to changing needs, 
courses have been developed for the 
master's program that cover the philosophy 
of service, components of food service, 
hotel product sales and information sys- 
tems. A solid background in the administra- 
tive aspects of food and beverage manage- 
ment and of lodging operations is provided 
through coursework in marketing, human 
resource management, accounting, econom- 
ics and financial analysis. 

Tourism is an integral economic, social 
and cultural component of global, national 
and individual development. The rise of 
tourism as an activity and economic force 
has caused an increase in the demand by 
the private sector for highly educated 
executives. According to a study by the 
Travel Industry Association of America, 
more than 650,000 executive positions exist 
in all segments of the travel and tourism 
industry. In recognition of the importance of 
tourism and the need for advanced study in 
the field, the master's program provides 
courses in resource development and 



86 

management at travel destinations and in 
business and leisure travel markets. These 
and other courses measure the needs and 
wants of different travel markets; explore 
the dimensions of international tourism; 
and consider the social, cultural and envi- 
ronmental impacts of tourism. 

Program Goals 

The goal of the master of science pro- 
gram in hospitality and tourism is to 
provide students with tools that enable 
them to manage change. Structural changes 
in society demand that hospitality and 
tourism executives be able to manage 
successfully in a workplace that is cultur- 
ally diverse and technologically advanced. 
Graduates of this program are capable of 
translating theory into reality, of creating an 
atmosphere where employees are motivated 
to provide the highest levels of quality 
service in a professional manner, and of 
communicating with a diverse workforce 
and a demanding clientele. 

The master of science degree in hospital- 
ity and tourism is designed to: 

• prepare students for leadership in the 
hospitality and tourism industries; 

• provide students with advanced concep- 
tual and theoretical knowledge and 
skills relevant to hospitality and 
tourism; 

• integrate coursework, research and 
professional work experience to allow 
for the development of refined interper- 
sonal communication, critical analysis, 
flexibility and creativity; and 

• teach students to cope with automation, 
change and diversity. 

The program provides opportunities for 
students to: 

• develop specific professional competen- 
cies in hotel, food service and tourism 
through focused coursework and a 
hands-on work experience requirement; 

• acquire the quantitative, computer and 
managerial skills needed for analysis of 
information relevant to hospitality and 
tourism executives; and 

• select a concentration that will enhance 
individual career goals in the hospitality 
and tourism industry. 



Please note: New applications will not be accepted 
after the date of September 15, 1997 for the 
curriculum currently in effect for the master's 
program in hospitality and tourism. For 
information regarding future plans for graduate 
study in this field, contact the program director 
or the Graduate Admissions Office. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission to the M.S. in 
hospitality and tourism are required to hold 
a four-year baccalaureate degree, or the 
equivalent, from an accredited institution. 
The faculty of the School of Hotel, Restau- 
rant, Tourism and Dietetics Administration 
seeks applicants with strong academic 
ability, high motivation, professional 
experience and an aptitude to do graduate- 
level work. Admission decisions are based 
on an evaluation of all material submitted 
in support of the application: two letters of 
recommendation, official transcripts of all 
previous undergraduate and graduate 
course work and official test scores on 
either the Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) General Test, the Graduate Manage- 
ment Admissions Test (GMAT) or the Miller 
Analogies Test (MAT). 

In addition to the previously listed 
criteria for admission, international stu- 
dents from countries where English is not 
the official language must demonstrate 
proof of English proficiency as described 
elsewhere in this catalog. 

Documentation of relevant professional 
experience and other supporting informa- 
tion may be required before a final decision 
is made. 

Advanced Standing 

Advanced standing may be granted for 
approved courses taken at other accredited 
institutions, subject to the transfer/ waiver 
and residency requirement policies of the 
University of New Haven detailed else- 
where in this catalog. Advanced standing in 
this program will not be granted for work 
completed five or more years before appli- 
cation for admission or readmission. All 
work accepted for advanced standing must 
have been completed with a grade of "B" or 



better and must be approved for acceptance 
by the program coordinator. 

Unique Program Features and 
Requirements 

All students without an appropriate 
undergraduate degree (i.e., hotel, restau- 
rant, travel, tourism, recreation, leisure, 
hospitality) may be required to take HT 600, 
a special graduate-level, noncredit course, 
in order to satisfy prerequisite require- 
ments. 

Because of the unique nature of the 
hospitality and tourism industry, entering 
students with no industry work experience 
will be required to complete a 200-hour 
work practicum. 

Outcome Measures 

The master of science degree in hospital- 
ity and tourism employs the following 
criteria to measure the effectiveness of the 
program: 

• student level of academic accomplish- 
ment, including coursework and 
practicum; 

• student scholarly development involv- 
ing either a thesis or research project; 
and 

• placement, career progression and 
accomplishments of graduates. 

Internships 

There are many opportunities in the 
Connecticut/New York area for intern 
experiences in government agencies, 
private-sector firms and the quasi-public 
sector. Internships are provided through the 
assistance and guidance of the school's 
internship coordinator. The intern experi- 
ence is directly related to the student's 
academic program and of cin appropriate 
professional level. Internships may be paid 
or unpaid, and are expected to be 300 hours 
in length. 

M.S., Hospitality and Tourism 

A total of 48 graduate credits is required 
for completion of the master of science in 
hospitality and tourism. The program 



Academic Programs 87 

consists of 16 courses of which 4 courses 
will be taken in one of the two concentra- 
tions, either the concentration in hospitality 
or the concentration in tourism. 

With the approval of the graduate 
coordinator, a student may elect to write a 
master's thesis as part of the program. 
Students who elect the thesis option are 
required to register for six credits of thesis, 
HT 698 and 699 Thesis I and II. The six 
thesis credits would replace six credits of 
coursework in the program (HT 680 and HT 
690). Thesis proposals must be submitted to 
the thesis adviser six months prior to 
enrolling in HT 698 so that formal approval 
may be obtained. The thesis must show 
ability to organize material in a clear and 
original manner and must present well- 
reasoned conclusions. Thesis preparation 
and submission must comply with the 
Graduate School policy on theses as well as 
specific department requirements. 

Required Courses 

EC 601 Macroeconomics and 

Microeconomics, or 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 
HT 625 Hospitality and Tourism Human 

Resources 
HT 630 Dimensions in Tourism 
HT 635 Hospitality and Tourism 

Accounting 
HT 645 Philosophy of Service 
HT 650 Hospitality and Tourism Marketing 
HT 655 Development of Hospitality and 

Tourism Operations 
HT 660 Hospitality and Tourism Informa- 
tion Systems 
HT 680 Hospitality and Tourism Internship 
HT 690 Research Project 
MG 685 Research Methods in Business 

Administration 
QA 604 Probability and Statistics 
Concentration (four courses) 
Total credits: 48 

Concentration in Hospitality 

HT 608 Food and Beverage Operations 
HT 622 Lodging Operations and 

Management 
Plus two elective courses. 



88 



Concentration in Tourism 

HT 642 Travel Markets: Business and 
Leisure 

HT 678 Destinations: Resource Develop- 
ment and Management 

Plus two elective courses. 

Human Nutrition 

Director: Robert W. FitzGerald, Human 
Nutrition Program, Ph.D., Arizona State 
University 

The purpose of the program leading to 
the master of science degree in human 
nutrition is to provide top quality nutrition 
education at the graduate level for w^orking 
adult students in the food, pharmaceutical, 
and allied health fields so that they may 
apply up-to-date and in-depth nutritional 
knowledge in their areas of specialization 
and gain the foundation needed for further 
study at the Ph.D. level. The focus of the 
program is the role of nutrition in health 
and disease. Therefore, the curriculum is 
designed to prepare graduates with a deep 
understanding of the close connection 
between nutrition, health and disease as 
well as to provide them with a detailed 
study of the body of knowledge necessary 
to understand these close connections and 
the evidence supporting them. 

For the convenience of students whose 
work schedules and other obligations 
preclude attendance at evening classes, this 
program is offered on a weekend schedule. 
Classes meet monthly both Saturdays and 
Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

This master of science degree program in 
human nutrition is also offered at the 
California Pacific Medical Center in San 
Francisco and at Cedars-Sinai Medical 
Center in Los Angeles under the approval 
of the Council for Private Postsecondary 
and Vocational Education, which is the 
agency of the State of California that 
monitors out-of-state institutions. 

Admission Policy 

This program is most appropriate for 



registered dietitians and certain other 
licensed health professionals, or for high 
school science teachers and /or others with 
undergraduate majors in chemistry or the 
biological sciences. Minimum admission 
requirements are a four-year baccalaureate 
degree from an accredited university or 
equivalent, with an above-average under- 
graduate record and including successfully 
completed coursework in introductory 
biochemistry or organic chemistry plus 
human anatomy and physiology. 

M.S., Human Nutrition 

Completion of a total of 33 graduate 
credit hours is required for the master of 
science degree in human nutrition. How- 
ever, with the permission of the program 
director, students may elect to talce a 
comprehensive examination covering the 
program's entire content in lieu of NU 690 
Research Project. For students who elect to 
take and successfully complete the compre- 
hensive examination, a total of 30 graduate 
credit hours would comprise the credit- 
hour requirement for the degree. 

Required Courses 

NU 601 Nutritional Biochemistry I — 
Fundamentals 

NU 602 Nutritional Biochemistry II — 
Applications 

NU 603 Nutritional Physiology 

NU 604 Vitamin Metabolism 

NU 605 Mineral Metabolism 

NU 609 Research Methodology in Nutrition 

NU 610 Nutrition and Disease I 

NU 611 Nutrition and Disease II 

NU 612 Nutrition and Health: Contempo- 
rary Issues and Controversies 

NU 613 Maternal and Child Nutrition 

NU 690 Research Project (or Comprehensive 
Examination) 

Total credits: 33 (or 30) 

Industrial Engineering 

Coordinator: M. Ali Montazer, Professor of 
Industrial Engineering, Ph.D., State 
University of New York at Buffalo 

This program is intended to meet the 
needs of professionally employed engineers 



working in an environment where cost 
effectiveness, high productivity and effec- 
tive use of resources is crucial. It has been 
designed to give the student an advanced 
level of training beyond the baccalaureate, 
sufficient to prepare for a leadership role in 
industry, insofar as the practice of industrial 
engineering is concerned. 

The program centers on a core sequence 
required of all students. It contains courses 
in analysis and design considered to be of 
common interest to all industrial engineers 
of advanced professional standing. (See the 
notes which follow regarding waivers 
related to these core courses.) Students 
complete the program by choosing elective 
courses in operations research, human 
factors, manufacturing engineering, com- 
puter science or others that are particularly 
suited to their professional interests. 
Electives should be chosen so as to provide 
a coherent selection meeting the student's 
needs. Once the student and the student's 
adviser have agreed on these electives, they 
shall become part of the student's program 
of study. All subsequent changes in elec- 
tives must be made with the adviser's 
advance written consent. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission to the pro- 
gram are expected to hold an undergradu- 
ate degree in engineering from a program 
accredited by the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology, or demon- 
strated equivalent. In some cases, an 
applicant with a degree in a related field 
may be considered for admission. Students 
entering this program are expected to be 
competent in mathematics through calcu- 
lus. Those with insufficient mathematics 
background will be required to take ap- 
proved mathematics courses (e.g., M 610 
Fundamentals of Calculus) outside /in 
addition to the program requirements. 
Applicants with degrees in fields other than 
industrial engineering will be required to 
take a number of undergraduate courses or 
otherwise demonstrate proficiency in 
several areas normally included in an 
undergraduate industrial engineering 
program. 



Academic Programs 89 

Though admission decisions are based 
primarily on an applicant's undergraduate 
record, the promise of academic success is 
the essential factor for admission. 

Due to the sequencing of courses in this 
program, full-time students applying to the 
master's program in industrial engineering 
usually will be accepted for the fall term 
only. Acceptance for full-time study to 
begin in the winter or spring terms will be 
made only in rare circumstances on a case- 
by-case basis. 

M.S.I.E. 

The program consists of 48 credit hours. 
The transfer of credit from other institutions 
will be permitted subject to the Graduate 
School policy on transfer credit detailed 
elsewhere in this catalog. Required courses 
may be waived on the basis of undergradu- 
ate courses taken at accredited institutions. 
All waivers must be approved in writing by 
the department of industrial engineering 
and are conditional upon subsequent 
academic performance. In some cases, the 
program coordinator may permit substitu- 
tion of relevant courses in place of the 
required courses. 

Research Project/Thesis 
Requirement 

All students in the program will com- 
plete a thesis or an appropriate special 
project which will partially fulfill the 
elective requirements for the degree. The 
special project requirement will usually be 
satisfied by taking a research project course 
in a group setting. A designated area of 
study may be indicated for each such 
research project course; in these cases, the 
instructor will offer direction in the area 
and will assist students in the development 
of substantial individual projects. Particular 
requirements or prerequisites may be set for 
the course or for those individuals intend- 
ing to complete a project. In appropriate 
cases having special approval, a student 
may elect to write a thesis or take a research 
project course (as listed in the catalog) on an 
individual basis. 



90 



Required Courses 

CS 606 Technical Programming/ FORTRAN 
IE 601 Introduction to Operations 

Research/Management Science 
IE 607 Probability Theory 
IE 609 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics 
IE 623 Decision Analysis 
IE 624 Quality Analysis 
IE 651 Human Engineering I 
IE 655 Manufacturing Analysis 
IE 681 System Simulation 
IE 686 Inventory Analysis 
IE 688 Design of Experiments 
Approved Electives (five courses, including 

project/ thesis) 
Total credits: 48 

Industrial Hygiene 

Coordinator: Brad T. Garber, Professor of 
Occupational Safety and Health, Ph.D., 
University of California, Berkeley 

Industrial hygiene is that aspect of 
occupational safety and health concerned 
with preventing illness or disease caused by 
exposure to hazardous agents in the w^ork- 
place. The field is expanding rapidly due to 
increased societal pressures for safe and 
healthful places of employment. This 
expansion has produced a parallel increase 
in the demand for well-trained industrial 
hygiene professionals. Rapid growth of the 
profession is illustrated by the dramatic 
increase in membership of the American 
Industrial Hygiene Association during the 
past decade. U.S. Nezvs and World Report 
targeted industrial hygiene as a professional 
area with high potential, and additional 
growth expected through the '90s. 

Objectives 

The M.S. program is designed to provide 
a comprehensive education in the technical 
and managerial aspects of industrial 
hygiene. Both practicing professionals and 
persons aspiring to enter the field will find 
their educational needs accommodated. 
Graduates will be prepared to fill upper- 
level positions in industry, government and 
labor unions. 



Admission Requirements 

Candidates for admission to the M.S. in 
industrial hygiene are required to hold a 
baccalaureate degree, from an accredited 
institution, based on a minimum of 120 
semester hours or the equivalent that 
includes 60 or more, and preferably 68 or 
more, semester-hour credits in undergradu- 
ate or graduate level courses in science, 
mathematics, engineering and technology, 
with at least 15 of those hours at the upper 
(junior, senior or graduate) level and a 
minimum of 21 semester-hour credits, or 
the equivalent, in communications, humani- 
ties and social sciences. 

M.S., Industrial Hygiene 

Completion of 48 credit hours of gradu- 
ate study is required for the master of 
science in industrial hygiene degree. The 
transfer of graduate credits from other 
institutions and /or the waiver of some 
courses, based on undergraduate study, is 
permitted subject to the policies detailed in 
the Graduate Catalog. Flexibility in the 
choice of electives makes it possible for 
students to tailor the program to their 
individual interests and needs. 

Students may elect to write a thesis, in 
which case they would register for six 
credits of SH 698/699 Thesis I and II in lieu 
of the three-credit research project course 
and one elective. 

Required Courses 

EN 610 Environmental Health 

EN 612 Epidemiology 

M 605 Biostatistics 

SH 602 Safety Organization and 

Administration 
SH 608 Industrial Hygiene Practices 
SH 615 Toxicology 

SH 620 Occupational Safety and Health Law 
SH 630 Product Safety and Liability 
SH 660 Industrial Ventilation 
SH 665 Industrial Hygiene Measurements 
SH 667 Control of Occupational Health 

Hazards 
SH 690 Research Project I 
Electives (four courses) 
Total credits: 48 



Elective Courses* 

CE 605 Solid Waste Management 

CE 606 Environmental Law and Legislation 

CH 601 Environmental Chemistry 

CH 602 Environmental Chemical Analysis 

EN 600 Environmental Geoscience 

EN 601 Principles of Ecology 

EN 606 Environmental Data Analysis 

EN 607 Environmental Reports and Impact 

Assessment 
EN 613 Radioactivity and Radiation in the 

Environment 
EN 618 Hazardous Materials Management 
FS 625 Chemistry of Fires and Explosions 
IE 651/652 Human Engineering I and II 
IE 688 Design of Experiments 
SH 605 Industrial Safety Engineering 
SH 611 OSH Research Methods and 

Techniques 
SH 661 Microcomputers in Occupational 

Safety and Health 
SH 691 Research Project II 
SH 698/699 Thesis I and II 

*Other courses may be selected with the approval of the 
coordinator. 

In addition to the master of science 
program, an industrial hygiene concentra- 
tion is available in the M.S. program in 
occupational safety and health management 
along with graduate certificates in the field; 
see Table of Contents. 

Industrial/ 

Organizational 

Psychology 

Coordinator: Tara L'Heureux, Assistant 
Professor of Psychology, Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut 

The study and practice of indus- 
trial and organizational psychology is 
directed toward enliancing the effectiveness 
and functioning of organizations by apply- 
ing psychological principles to human work 
behavior. 

The primary goal of the program leading 
to the master of arts degree in industrial 
and organizational psychology is to provide 



Academic Programs 91 

students with the knowledge and experi- 
ence necessary to improve the satisfaction 
and productivity of people at work. 

Graduates typically perform activities in 
a number of areas that focus on individual, 
group and organizational processes includ- 
ing: 

Organizational change and development 

Consultation 

Motivation and morale 

Leadership and managerial 

development 

Conflict management 

Team /group dynamics 

Recruiting, selection, and placement 

Performance management 

Attitude and opinion measurement 

Training design and implementation 

Strategic human resource plarming 

Employment law 

Job analysis and evaluation 

Job design and enrichment 

Employee assistance programs 

Compensation and benefits 

Program evaluation 



Building on a strong foundation of 
theory, the program emphasizes application 
of principles in a wide variety of work 
settings. The curriculum is strengthened 
by ongoing, active relationships with local 
and regional human resource and applied 
psychological associations. Another unique 
feature of the program is The Center for 
Dispute Resolution (CDR) which offers 
mediation services to UNH students, 
faculty, and staff, as well as providing 
training in mediation and negotiation. 
Furthermore, the program conforms to the 
standards of The Council of Applied 
Master's Programs in Psychology 
(CAMPP). 

This master's degree prepares students 
for careers in private and public corpora- 
tions, consulting firms, government agen- 
cies and applied research institutions. 
Persons aspiring to enter the field, practic- 
ing professionals and individuals who plan 
to pursue graduate training beyond the 
master 's level will find their educational 



92 



needs accommodated due to the flexible 
nature of the program. 

Admission Policy 

Applicants are expected to possess social 
and interpersonal characteristics that will 
support success in organizational settings. 
Students who give evidence of a mature 
interest in the application of psychological 
principles to organizational problems and 
who hold an undergraduate degree from an 
accredited college or university are eligible 
for admission. 

Students who haven taken the Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE) within the past 
five years are asked to report their scores to 
the Graduate School. In addition to the 
Graduate School application form, appli- 
cants will be asked to complete an I/O 
program questionnaire and submit it 
directly to the Graduate School. For appli- 
cants whose native language is not English, 
TOEFL scores must be reported to the 
Graduate School. ESL certification is also 
welcomed. 

An undergraduate major in psychology 
is not specifically required as a basis for 
consideration. However, all students are 
expected to have at least an introductory- 
level understanding of psychological 
concepts, principles and methods before 
taking courses in the master of arts in 
industrial / organizational psychology 
program. 

M.A., Industrial/ 
Organizational Psychology 

A total of 48 credit hours is required of 
candidates for the degree of master of arts 
in industrial /organizational psychology. 
Candidates for this degree must complete 
24 credit hours of required courses in the 
core curriculum. Another 24 credit hours 
(including concentrations, program options 
and electives) are chosen after consultation 
with the program coordinator in light of the 
student's academic and professional goals. 
Students may not complete more than nine 
credit hours of electives until they have 
satisfied the core requirements. Up to nine 
credit hours of electives may be taken in 



other departments, such as industrial 
engineering, economics, management, 
marketing or public administration. 

Transfer Credit 

The transfer of credit from other institu- 
tions will be permitted subject to the 
Graduate School policy on transfer of credit 
detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 

Thesis 

Students may elect to write a thesis as 
part of the program of study. The thesis 
must show ability to organize materials in a 
clear and original manner and present well- 
reasoned conclusions. Thesis preparation 
and submission must comply with the 
Graduate School policy on theses as well as 
all specific department requirements. 

Program Options 

Students have the opportunity to de- 
velop a program that meets their particular 
needs and interests by choosing from many 
elective courses and various program 
options. These options include a thesis, for 
those students interested in future pursuit 
of a doctoral degree; an internship, for those 
students interested in a realistic introduc- 
tion to an organizational environment; or a 
practicum, for those students who are 
already employed. 

Option 1 (Thesis) is intended primarily 
for those students who are interested in 
continuing their education in doctoral-level 
programs. This option gives students the 
research experience necessary to be success- 
ful in pursuit of admission to and comple- 
tion of a Ph.D. program. 

Option 2 (Internship/Practicum) allows 
the student to acquire special skills through 
coordinating formal coursework with an 
internship or practicum in an organizational 
setting. The internship gives the student 
with limited work experience the 
opportunity to work in cooperating organi- 
zations or consulting firms. The practicum 
experience is for the student who is cur- 
rently employed. 

The content of the practicum or intern- 
ship will be established jointly by the 
cooperating organization, the program 



coordinator and the student. A comprehen- 
sive project report is required in which the 
student will analyze and integrate intern- 
ship /practicum experiences with relevant 
research and coursework. 

Option 3 (Approved Electives) consists 
of elective courses selected under faculty 
advisement. The choice of electives is 
intended to provide the student with a 
broad interdisciplinary background, com- 
plementing the student's own academic 
training and interest. A comprehensive 
examination covering material from the 
required core psychology courses is re- 
quired under this option. 

Program Concentrations 

Within each of the program options 
described above, students may concentrate 
in (1) the industrial-personnel area, (2) the 
organizational area or (3) the field of 
conflict management. A concentration 
requires 12 credit hours of specific elective 
courses, which would be counted as part of 
the 24 credits required in the elective option 
(Thesis, Internship /Practicum or Approved 
Electives) selected by the student for 
completion of the program. If a concentra- 
tion is selected, the student must notify the 
program coordinator as well as the Regis- 
trar. A concentration is not required if the 
student's educational or career goals can 
best be met without this specialization. 

Required Courses 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 

P 608 Psychometrics and Statistics* 

P 609 Research Methods* 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 

P 620 Industrial Psychology 

P 635 Assessment of Human Performance 

with Standardized Tests 
P 640 Industrial Motivation and Morale ' 
P 645 Seminar in Industrial /Organizational 

Psychology 
Program option** (eight courses) 
Total credits: 48 

Program Options 

Option 1 (Thesis) 

P 698/699 Thesis I and II 
Electives** (six courses) 



Academic Programs 93 

Option 2 (Internship/Practicum) 

P 693/694 Organizational Internship I and II, 

or P 678/679 Practicum I and II 
Electives** (six courses) 

Option 3 (Approved Electives) 

Comprehensive examination required 
Electives** (eight courses) 

* Undergraduate preparation in statistics is prerequisite. 

* *The choice of electives is made in consultation with the 
program coordinator in light of the student's academic and 
professional goals. 

Concentration in Industrial- 
Personnel Psychology 

Students who select this concentration 
will count these course credits toward the 
elective courses required in one of the 
program options listed previously. 

P 610 Program Evaluation 

P 644 Performance Measurement 

Plus two of the following: 

MG 645 Management of Human Resources 
P 628 The Interview 

P 641 Personnel Development and Training 
Total credits: 12 

Concentration in 
Organizational Psychology 

Students who select this concentration 
will count these course credits toward the 
elective courses required in one of the 
program options listed previously. 

P 642 Organizational Change and 

Development 
P 643 The Psychology of Conflict 

Management I 

Plus two of the following: 

P 612 Consultation Seminar 
P 623 Psychology of the Small Group 
P 624 Experiential Self-Analytic Group 
P 638 Psychology of Communication and 

Opinion Change 
Total credits: 12 



94 

Concentration in the 
Psychology of Conflict 
Management 

Students who select this concentration 
will count these course credits toward the 
elective courses required in one of the 
program options listed previously. 

P 643 The Psychology of Conflict 

Management I 
P 646 The Psychology of Conflict 

Management II 

Plus two of the following: 

IB 650 International Business Negotiating 
MG 667 Multicultural Issues in the 

Workplace 
P 612 Consultation Seminar 
P 623 Psychology of the Small Group 
P 638 Psychology of Communication and 

Opinion Change 
PS 655 Conflict Resolution 
Total credits: 12 

See page 108 for the certificate in 
applications of psychology 

Industrial Relations 

Coordinator: Joseph A. Parker, Professor of 
Economics, Ph.D., University of 
Oklahoma 

Environmental forces over the past 
decades have created a demand for greater 
sophistication and professionalism from 
those responsible for personnel functions 
within all organizations whether public or 
private, profit or nonprofit, unionized or 
not. More and more companies and institu- 
tions are requiring the services of people 
conversant with both the large body of 
available tools and the constraints that have 
evolved during this period. The program 
leading to the master of science degree in 
industrial relations represents a flexible 
response to this demand. 

Industrial relations, as a management 
and behavioral science discipline, is con- 
cerned with all aspects of the employment 
relationship and, in particular, with the 
organization's maintenance of the human 
resources necessary to achieve organiza- 



tional objectives. As an academic discipline 
and profession, industrial relations is an 
interdisciplinary, problem-solving field that 
attempts to maintain harmony and resolve 
conflicts among the four major parties to 
the employment relationship — employees, 
employers, government and, where applica- 
ble, unions. 

The M.S. in industrial relations program 
is aimed at people presently employed in or 
aspiring to positions in various kinds of 
organizations in the fields of employment, 
training and development, wage and salary 
administration, employee services and 
benefits, labor-management relations, job 
and organizational design, labor economics 
and manpower planning. 

Because of the diversity of student 
interests and employment demand, the 
program is flexible. The required courses in 
the program are drawn from the disciplines 
of economics, management and psychology. 
There is a great deal of flexibility in choice 
of elective courses. As a result, students will 
find it possible to tailor the curriculum to 
their specific needs and interests. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission are required to 
hold a baccalaureate degree from an accred- 
ited institution of higher education. While 
not an absolute necessity, the undergradu- 
ate degree should preferably be in business 
administration, puolic administration or in 
a social or behavioral science (e.g., econom- 
ics, history, political science, psychology or 
sociology). Application for admission is also 
open to full-time employed professionals in 
personnel and industrial relations holding a 
baccalaureate degree in any field from an 
accredited institution. 

Though admissions decisions are usually 
based on an applicant's undergraduate 
record, in some cases the applicant may be 
required to submit scores from the Gradu- 
ate Management Admission Test (GMAT). 

M.S., Industrial Relations 

A total of 39 graduate credit hours is 
required for completion of the master of 
science degree in industrial relations. Of 
these, 12 credit hours are in approved 
elective courses. A list of approved elective 
courses appears below. 

Students may elect to write a thesis in 
lieu of MG 690 or EC 690 Research Project 



and one elective course. The thesis must 
show abiUty to organize material in a clear 
and original manner and must present well- 
reasoned conclusions. Thesis preparation 
and submission must comply with the 
Graduate School policy on theses as well as 
all specific department requirements. 

Required Courses 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 
EC 627 Economics of Labor Relations 
EC 687 Collective Bargaining 
MG 637 Management Process 
MG 645 Management of Human Resources 
MG 678 Personnel Management Seminar 
MG 679 Industrial Relations Seminar 
MG 690 Research Project, or 
EC 690 Research Project 
P 619 Organizational Behavior 
Approved Electives (four courses) 
Total credits: 39 

Elective Courses 

(Other courses may qualify subject to 
approval of the coordinator.) 

CO 621 Managerial Communication 

IB 650 International Business Negotiating 

IE 604 Management Systems 

EC 629 Business and Society 

MG 640 Management of Health Care 

Organizations 
MG 661 Development of Management 

Thought 
MG 662 Organization Theory 
MG 663 Leadership and Team Building 
MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 
MG 665 Compensation Administration 
MG 667 Multicultural Issues in the 

Workplace 
MG 680 Current Topics in Business 

Administration 
MG 694 Internship 
P 620 Industrial Psychology 
P 628 The Interview 
P 640 Industrial Motivation and Morale 
P 641 Personnel Development and Training 
P 643 The Psychology of Conflict 

Management I 
P 646 The Psychology of Conflict 

Management II 
PA 620 Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector 
PA 659 Human Resource Plaiming in Health 

Care 



Academic Programs 95 

PA 662 Recruitment and Retention of Health 

Care Professionals 
QA 604 Probability and Statistics 
SH 620 Occupational Safety and Health 

Law 
SO 601 Minority Group Relations 

Management Systems 
(Sc.D.) 

Director: Omid Nodoushani, Associate 
Professor of Management, Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 

The doctor of science in management 
systems is a terminal, applied research- 
oriented degree in the broad and 
rapidlyevolving field of management 
systems. It is designed for two audiences: 
private and public sector employees in 
senior staff, management and executive 
positions; and individuals planning aca- 
demic careers in management. Students 
may be accepted for both part-time and full- 
time study. 

The Sc.D. program is accredited by the 
Board of Governors for Higher Education of 
the State of Connecticut and by the New 
England Association of Schools and Col- 
leges. 

Please note: At press time, new applica- 
tions were not currently being accepted for 
the doctoral program. For additional 
information, contact the Director of the 
Sc.D. program or the Graduate Admissions 
Office. 

Admission Policy 

All decisions on admission to the UNH 
doctor of science program are made on an 
individual basis by a Doctoral Admissions 
Committee. All applicants must: 

• submit the special doctoral program 
application for admission form along 
with a written Statement of Purpose 
document; 



96 



• provide official transcripts showing 
evidence of an earned baccalaureate 
degree and work to date or completion 
of an earned master's degree from an 
accredited institution; 

• take the GMAT and /or have official, 
current or recent (within five years) test 
scores for the GMAT reported to the 
university; and 

• submit three letters of recommendation 
for the Sc.D. program. 

Application to the doctoral program requires 
special forms which are available from the 
Graduate Admissions Office. 

Applicants providing evidence of an 
earned M.B.A. from an accredited college or 
university with superior performance in the 
master's program will be considered for 
admission when they have met the above 
requirements for all applicants. 

Applicants providing evidence of 
superior performance in an earned master's 
degree other than an M.B.A. from an 
accredited college or university will be 
required to pass written master 's-level 
qualifying examinations in accounting, 
economics, finance, management, market- 
ing, management information systems and 
statistics or will be required to complete the 
appropriate graduate-level course(s) with a 
grade of "B" or better prior to fully matricu- 
lated enrollment in the doctoral-level 
courses, provided that they have met all 
other admission criteria. All prerequisites 
must be completed before enrollment in 
doctoral-level courses. The Doctoral Admis- 
sions Committee and /or faculty teaching 
doctoral-level courses may require success- 
ful completion of special examinations 
designed to assess current competencies in 
specific areas. 

In addition to the previously listed 
criteria for admission, international stu- 
dents from countries where English is not 
the official language must demonstrate 
proof of English proficiency by submitting 
official scores of the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) examination, 
with a total score of at least 600. 

To provide for the special needs of 



working people, the UNH doctoral program 
offers the opportunity for part-time as well 
as full-time study. Full-time doctoral study 
at UNH consists of registration for a mini- 
mum of four and a maximum of six doc- 
toral courses per academic year of three 
trimesters. Full-time doctoral study for 
international students who are required to 
maintain full-time enrollment for their 
immigration status is defined as two 
doctoral courses per trimester for a total of 
six doctoral courses per academic year. 
Such persons will continue to be considered 
full-time students as long as their disserta- 
tion adviser, department chair and /or 
director of the doctoral program certify that 
the student is making satisfactory progress 
toward completion of the doctoral degree. 
Full-time students are expected to spend 
three years in the program. 

Part-time doctoral study will consist of 
registration for at least two doctoral courses 
per academic year. Part-time students 
normally require five to six years to com- 
plete the program. 

Sc.D., Management Systems 

The three segments of the doctoral 
program are: ten 700-level core courses, 
written and oral comprehensive examina- 
tions, and the completion and successful 
defense of a dissertation representing the 
results of original research performed under 
the supervision of a faculty adviser and a 
dissertation committee. 

Core Program 

The core courses, identified by 700-level 
prefixes, are restricted to doctoral students. 
The uniform core is required of all students 
in the program and leads to the doctoral 
comprehensive examinations which will 
qualify the student for candidacy. All core 
courses must be taken in residence at the 
university. Course descriptions for the core 
courses appear on page 166 of this catalog. 

EC 703 Forecasting and Econometrics 
EC 704 Public and Private Policy Interfaces 
FI 701 Seminar in Financial Policy 
IE 704 Seminar in Management and Control 
Systems 



MG 701 Research Design I 

MG 702 Research Desigi\ II 

MG 737 Seminar in Management 

MG 738 Policy and Strategic Decision 

Making 
MK 701 Seminar in Strategic Marketing 
P 719 Topics in AppHed Behavioral Science 
Total credits: 30 

Doctoral students are expected to 
complete the doctoral core courses accord- 
ing to a sequencing approved by the 
Doctoral Committee. Exceptions to this 
policy must be approved by the director of 
the doctoral program. 

Throughout the program, any student 
with a QPR of less than 3.00 will be placed 
on probation. A student with a QPR of less 
than 3.00 upon completion of four or more 
courses is subject to dismissal from the 
program. Repetition of doctoral coursework 
is limited to no more than one repetition of 
any one course, up to a maximum of two 
courses. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

The purpose of the comprehensive 
examinations is to measure the breadth and 
depth of doctoral students' knowledge in 
their field of study. These comprehensive 
examinations will be conducted at the 
conclusion of each student's formal 
coursework. In order to qualify for admis- 
sion to the comprehensive examination, 
doctoral students must have completed all 
of the doctoral core courses with a QPR of 
at least 3.30. 

The doctoral comprehensive examina- 
tions will include both a written and an oral 
component. The written examination will 
cover the area of management systems and 
will be comprised of a breadth segment and 
a depth segment. 

The breadth segment will cover systems 
theory, systems research, evolution of 
management thoughts and leading-edge as 
well as current concepts/theories in man- 
agement systems. 

The depth segment will cover the area of 
specialization chosen by the student and 
related to the student's research interest and 
dissertation area, including knowledge of 



Academic Programs 97 

relevant research design and statistics. 

The written comprehensive examina- 
tions will be scheduled in November and 
May of each year. 

A grade of 75-89 shall be considered a 
"Pass" and a grade of 90 or better shall be 
considered a "High Pass." When a student 
achieves the grade of "High Pass" in both 
the breadth and the depth segments of the 
written comprehensive examinations, the 
formal oral examination will not be re- 
quired. An oral examination will be sched- 
uled for all students who have not achieved 
a "High Pass" grade in both segments of 
their written comprehensive examinations. 
The oral examination, when needed, will be 
scheduled within one month following the 
announcement of the written comprehen- 
sive examination results to the student. 

Doctoral students must maintain con- 
tinuing registration in each trimester 
following completion of the last doctoral 
course, while they are preparing for and 
taking the comprehensive examination, and 
in any trimester they are not registered for 
dissertation credits. 

Dissertation 

A dissertation is required of all candi- 
dates for the Sc.D. degree. After passing the 
comprehensive examinations, a candidate 
will participate in the selection of a disserta- 
tion advisory committee. This dissertation 
committee will be composed of three 
University of New Haven full-time faculty 
members and may include at most two 
persons from outside the university who 
will act as dissertation readers. The outside 
persons shall hold earned doctorates and 
shall have expertise in the area of the 
dissertation focus. Doctoral dissertations 
must be based on original research. Candi- 
dates are encouraged to select dissertation 
topics that are oriented toward applied 
management problems. The dissertation 
will contain the research problem and 
background, the research methods and 
approaches used, and the results and 
discussion of the results. The exact defini- 
tion of the research problems and the 
research methods will be formulated by the 
candidate in consultation with the disserta- 
tion adviser and with the approval of the 
dissertation committee. 



98 



Candidates must register for a three- 
credit dissertation course (MG 801, MG 802, 
MG 803 and MG 804) in each of the four 
consecutive trimesters following the formal 
creation of a dissertation committee and 
approval of the dissertation proposal. After 
completion of the last of the 10 doctoral core 
courses, students must maintain continuing 
registration in each trimester that they are 
not registered for dissertation credits. 

Following successful completion of the 
doctoral written and oral examinations, 
students will be notified in writing of their 
elevation to candidacy for the doctoral 
degree. Students will then be required to 
file the appropriate forms approving the 
members of the student's dissertation 
committee and the student's dissertation 
proposal. These forms are available from 
the director of the doctoral program or from 
the Graduate School Office. 

All coursework and the dissertation 
must be successfully completed within 
eight years of completion of the first 700- 
level course. 

Additional information regarding the 
requirements for the Sc.D. program in 
management systems is available from the 
director of the doctoral program. 

Mechanical Engineering 

Coordinator: Konstantine C. Lambrakis, 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 
Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

This program is intended to meet the 
needs of professionally employed engineers 
and scientists for academic work beyond 
the baccalaureate level. Its purpose is to 
increase competence in modem analysis 
and synthesis techniques as they apply to 
engineering design. 

The program centers on a core sequence 
which all students are expected to take. The 
core courses contain advanced methods of 
analysis and design which are of common 
interest in engineering work. Students 
complete the program by electing a series of 
courses in mechanical engineering particu- 
larly suited to their current professional 



interests. Early in the program, students, 
with the approval of the adviser, prepare a 
detailed plan ensuring an overall 
educational experience that is integrated 
and logical. 

All decisions regarding both core and 
elective requirements are subject to final 
approval by the student's adviser. The 
mechanical engineering program is offered 
for part-time study only; therefore, applica- 
tions will not be accepted for full-time 
enrollment. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission to the master's 
program in mechanical engineering are 
normally expected to have a grade average 
of "B" or better in their undergraduate 
coursework and to hold a bachelor's degree 
in mechanical engineering from a program 
accredited by the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology, or 
demonstrated equivalent. In some cases, 
applicants with a bachelor's degree in a 
field closely related to mechanical engineer- 
ing may be considered for admission. It is 
strongly recommended that applicants 
submit scores from the Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE). Two letters of recom- 
mendation from individuals familiar with 
the applicant's potential for graduate study 
are also required. Students accepted on a 
provisional basis may by required to 
complete certain additional undergraduate 
mechanical engineering courses prior to 
enrolling in the graduate courses. 

M.S.M.E. 

A minimum of 33 credits must be 
completed to earn the master of science 
degree in mechanical engineering. Transfer 
of credit from other institutions is subject to 
the Graduate School policy on transfer 
credit. A thesis is optional but highly 
recommended for students wishing to 
study in depth particular areas of interest 
under the guidance of a faculty member. 
Thesis topics should be approved by the 
faculty adviser when the student has 
completed 18 graduate credits. Students 
should contact the coordinator for thesis 



advisers in these specialized areas: acous- 
tics/aerodynamics, fluids/biomechanics, 
gas dynamics, heat transfer/ thermody- 
namics, appHed mechanics /op tics, systems 
analysis /machine design, materials/ 
metallurgy, random vibrations/ numerical 
analysis, solid mechanics/computer-aided 
design. Thesis preparation and submission 
must comply with the Graduate School 
policy on theses as well as with all specific 
department requirements. 

If a thesis is not chosen, and unless a ma- 
jor special project approved by the graduate 
program coordinator is completed within 
the scope of other mechanical engineering 
courses, a student will be required to under- 
take a three- or six-credit project, on an in- 
dependent study basis, supervised by a full- 
time faculty member in the department of 
mechanical engineering. 

Required Courses 

ME 602 Mechanical Engineering Analysis 

ME 610 Advanced Dynamics 

ME 615 Theory of Elasticity 

ME 620 Classical Thermodynamics 

ME 630 Advanced Fluid Mechanics 

Electives (six courses)* 

Total credits: 33 

Elective Courses* 

ME 604 Numerical Techniques in 

Mechanical Engineering 
ME 605 Finite Element Methods in 

Engineering 
ME 611 System Vibrations 
ME 612 Random Vibrations 
ME 613 Fundamentals of Acoustics 
ME 625 Mechanics of Continua 
ME 627 Computer-Aided Engineering 
ME 632 Advanced Heat Transfer 
ME 635 Dynamic Systems and Control 
ME 638 Measurement and Instrumentation 

in Mechanical Engineering 
ME 645 Computational Fluid Dynamics and 

Heat Transfer 
ME 655 Interfacing Mechanical Devices 
ME 670 Selected Topics 
ME 690 Research Project 
ME 695/696 Independent Study I and II 
ME 698/699 Thesis I and II 

*With the coordinator's written approval, three of the 
elective courses may be taken in departments other than 
mechanical engineering. 



Academic Programs 99 

Occupational Safety and 
Health Management 

Coordinator: Brad T. Garber, Professor of 
Occupational Safety and Health, Ph.D., 
University of California, Berkeley 

The M.S. program is designed to develop 
the skills required to manage a comprehen- 
sive safety and health program. It will 
accommodate both active practitioners and 
persons who wish to enter this dynamic 
field. An in-depth education is provided 
through a program of 27 credit hours of 
required courses and 21 credit hours of 
electives. The courses provide training in 
both the technical and management areas. 

Specifically, the graduates of the pro- 
gram will have received extensive instruc- 
tion in how to: 

• evaluate the quality and effectiveness of 
existing safety programs; 

• conduct surveys for health and safety 
hazards; 

• institute programs to improve safety and 
health performance; 

• establish accident prevention 
procedures; 

• implement control measures to eliminate 
or reduce hazards; 

• recommend methods of compliance with 
local, state and federal regulations and 
with voluntary standards; and 

• manage occupational safety and health 
programs in industry, government and 
labor unions. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission to the master 
of science in occupational safety and health 
management program are required to hold 
a baccalaureate degree from an accredited 
institution. Undergraduate courses in 
general chemistry, general physics and 
biology are required. Students who do not 
meet all requirements will be evaluated on 
an individual basis. 



100 



M.S., Occupational Safety and 
Health Management 

Candidates are required to complete 48 
credit hours of graduate work. Transfer of 
credit from other institutions will be permit- 
ted subject to the Graduate School policy on 
transfer credit noted elsewhere in this 
catalog. Consideration for waiver of core 
courses on the basis of undergraduate 
studies is at the discretion of the program 
coordinator. 

The student will choose 18 credit hours 
of electives in consultation with the adviser. 
In addition, students must take three credit 
hours of SH 693 Internship, SH 695 Inde- 
pendent Study or SH 690 Research Project, 
in order to complete the 21-credit elective 
portion of the program and satisfy the 
degree/project requirements. Students may 
elect to write a thesis, in which case they 
would register for six credits of SH 698/699 
in addition to 15 credit hours of other 
electives. 

Students electing to write a thesis must 
register for thesis credit with the depart- 
ment. The thesis must show the ability to 
organize material in a clear and original 
manner and present well-reasoned conclu- 
sions. Thesis preparation and submission 
must comply with the Graduate School 
policy on theses as well as specific depart- 
ment requirements. 

Required Courses 

MG 637 Management Process 
P 619 Organizational Behavior 
QA 604 Probability and Statistics, or 

M 605 Biostatistics 
SH 602 Safety Organization and 

Administration 
SH 605 Industrial Safety Engineering 
SH 608 Industrial Hygiene Practices 
SH 615 Toxicology 
SH 620 Occupational Safety and Health 

Law 
SH 630 Product Safety and Liability 
Electives (seven courses) 
Total credits: 48 

Elective Courses* 

CE 602 Biological Treatment of Aqueous 
Wastes 



CE 607 Water Pollution Control Processes 

CH 601 Environmental Chemistry 

EN 602 Environmental Effects of Pollutants 

EN 610 Environmental Health 

EN 612 Epidemiology 

EN 613 Radioactivity and Radiation in the 

Environment 
FS 666 Seminar on Industrial Fire Protection 
IE 651 Human Engineering I 
MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 
MG 678 Personnel Management Seminar 
P 640 Industrial Motivation and Morale 
SH 611 OSH Research Methods and 

Techniques 
SH 660 Industrial Ventilation 
SH 661 Microcomputers in Occupational 

Safety and Health 
SH 665 Industrial Hygiene Measurements 
SH 667 Control of Occupational Health 

Hazards 
SH 670 Selected Topics 
SH 690/691 Research Project I and II 
SH 693/694 OSH Internship I and II 
SH 695/696 Independent Study I and II 
SH 698/699 Thesis I and II 

*Other courses may be substituted with the consent of the 
program coordinator. 

Concentration in Industrial 
Hygiene 

Within the master of science program in 
occupational safety and health manage- 
ment, students may use their electives to 
fulfill the requirements for a concentration 
in industrial hygiene. The coursework is 
designed to meet the needs of both practic- 
ing industrial hygienists and those aspiring 
to enter this profession. Development of 
skills in the recognition, evaluation and 
control of occupational health hazards is the 
focus of this concentration. 

Students pursuing this concentration 
will take the required core curriculum; the 
three required credits of internship /re- 
search project/ independent study or six 
credits of thesis; and these electives: 

EN 610 Environmental Health 

EN 612 Epidemiology 

SH 660 Industrial Ventilation 



SH 665 Industrial Hygiene Measurements 
Elective (two courses) 
Total credits: 18 

See page 90 for the M.S. degree program 
in industrial hygiene and pages 113 and 116 
for certificates in related subjects. 

Operations Research 

Coordinator: M. Ali Montazer, Professor of 
Industrial Engineering, Ph.D., State 
University of New^ York at Buffalo 

Operations research has become an 
important professional discipline in recent 
years. Complex technical problems have 
been examined and solved using advanced 
mathematical techniques and computers. 
The master of science in operations research 
curriculum provides thorough coverage of 
the theory, methodology and application of 
these techniques. The program is designed 
to prepare qualified applicants with solid 
mathematics training — but from otherwise 
diverse backgrounds — to deal with impor- 
tant industrial, business, commercial and 
governmental problems. 

The program centers on a sequence of 
core courses recognized to be of common 
interest to all operations research practition- 
ers of advanced professional standing. 
Students complete the program by choosing 
elective courses in operations research, 
computer science, mathematics or other 
courses that are particularly suited to their 
professional interests. Electives should be 
chosen so as to provide a coherent selection 
meeting the student's needs. Once the 
student and an adviser have agreed to these 
electives, they shall become a part of the 
student's program of study. All subsequent 
changes in electives must be made with the 
adviser's advance written consent. 

M.S., Operations Research 

The program consists of 45 credit hours. 
Students entering this program are expected 
to be competent in mathematics through 
calculus. Those with insufficient mathemat- 
ics background will be required to take 



Academic Programs 101 

approved mathematics courses (e.g., M 610 
Fundamentals of Calculus) outside/in 
addition to the program requirements. The 
transfer of credit from other institutions will 
be permitted subject to the Graduate School 
policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere 
in this catalog. Required courses may be 
waived on the basis of undergraduate 
courses taken at accredited institutions. All 
waivers must be approved in writing by the 
program coordinator and are contingent 
upon subsequent academic performance. In 
some cases, the coordinator may permit 
substitution of relevant courses in place of 
required courses. 

Research Project/Thesis 
Requirement 

All students in the program will com- 
plete a thesis or an appropriate special 
project which will partially fulfill the 
elective requirements for the degree. The 
special project requirement will usually be 
satisfied by taking a research project course 
in a group setting. A designated area of 
study may be indicated for each such 
research project course; in these cases, the 
instructor will offer direction in the area 
and will assist students in the development 
of substantial individual projects. Particular 
requirements or prerequisites may be set for 
the course or for those individuals intend- 
ing to complete a project. In appropriate 
cases having special approval, a student 
may elect to write a thesis or take a research 
project course (as listed in the catalog) on an 
individual basis. 

Required Courses 

CS 606 Technical Programming /FORTRAN 
IE 601 Introduction to Operations 

Research /Management Science 
IE 607 Probability Theory 
IE 609 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics 
IE 621 Linear Programming 
IE 622 Queueing Theory 
IE 625 Advanced Mathematical 

Programming 
IE 681 System Simulation 
IE 685 TT\eory of Optimization 
IE 687 Stochastic Processes 



102 



IE 688 Design of Experiments 

Approved Electives (four courses, including 

project/ thesis) 
Total credits: 45 

Public Administration 

Coordinator: Charles Coleman, Assistant 
Professor of Public Administration, 
M.P.A., West Virginia University 

The general purpose of the master of 
public administration degree is the training 
of men and women at the graduate level for 
public service careers. Specifically, the 
program strives to: 

• equip students with modem analytic 
and quantitative tools of decision 
making and their application to complex 
problems of government and nonprofit 
organizations; 

• expose students to the wide range of 
administrative and managerial problems 
and responsibilities in the public sector; 
and 

• increase the student's knowledge and 
skills in the particular management 
functions of budgeting, planning, public 
policy formulation, public finance, 
public personnel administration and 
collective bargaining. 

M.P.A. 

The program consists of 42 graduate 
credit hours which are required of candi- 
dates for this degree. 

Students entering the M.P.A. program 
who lack adequate preparation in quantita- 
tive techniques may be required to 
undertake additional study in order to 
satisfy a prerequisite requirement. 
Adequate preparation is defined as 
satisfactory completion of three credit hours 
of introductory statistics. 

Required Courses 

EC 608 Economics for Public 

Administrators 
PA 601 Principles of Public Administration 
PA 602 Public Policy Formulation and 

Implementation 



PA 604 Communities and Social Change 
PA 611 Research Methods in Public 

Administration 
PA 620 Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public 

Sector 
PA 625 Administrative Behavior 
PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 
PA 690 Research Seminar* 
Electives or Concentration (five courses) 
Total credits: 42 

*Students enrolled in the educational administration 
concentration take ED 690 Research Project (3 credits) in 
place of PA 690. 

Concentration in City 
Management 

The courses selected for this concentra- 
tion will enable local government practitio- 
ners to develop and make better use of their 
personnel and budgetary resources. This 
ability is especially important today, as the 
federal government is reducing its fiscal 
support to local governments. 

Students choosing the concentration in 
city management will take the required core 
curriculum of nine courses and follow the 
city management concentration in lieu of 
their five elective courses. 

PA 630 Fiscal Management for Local 

Government 
PA 660 Urban Planning: Theory and 

Practice 
PA 661 Problems of Metropolitan Areas 
PS 616 Urban Government 

Plus one of the following: 

E 659 Writing and Speaking for 

Professionals 
EC 665 Urban and Regional Economic 

Development 
P 610 Program Evaluation 
SO 610 Urban Sociology 
Total credits: 15 

Concentration in Community- 
Clinical Services 

This concentration is designed to 
prepare students for administrative careers 
in clinical, mental health and related human 



service settings. The administration of 
programs within the contexts of social and 
community environments is stressed. 
Students will learn how to deliver services 
effectively within this turbulent 
environment. 

Students choosing the community- 
clinical services concentration take the core 
curriculum of nine courses and the four 
courses in the concentration plus one 
additional elective course. 

P 605 Survey of Community Psychology 
P 629 Introduction to Psychotherapy and 

Counseling 
P 632 Group Treatment and Family Therapy 

Plus one of the following: 

MG 640 Management of Health Care 

Organizations 
MG 663 Leadership and Team Building 
MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 
Total credits: 12 

Concentration in Educational 
Administration 

Students who complete this concentra- 
tion in educational administration as part of 
the M.P.A. degree program will meet the 
state requirements for certification for 
intermediate administration or supervi- 
sion.* 

Students choosing the educational 
administration concentration take the core 
curriculum of nine courses with one substi- 
tution (as described below) and follow the 
educational administration concentration in 
lieu of their five elective courses. 

ED 690 Research Project (this course to be 
taken in place of PA 690 in the core of 
the M.P.A. program) 

Plus the following: 

ED 612 Curriculum Design 

ED 652 Supervision: Issues and Procedures 

ED 653 Principles of School Administration 

ED 680 Contemporary Issues 

ED 682 Measurement, Assessment and 

Evaluation 
Total credits: 18 



Academic Programs 103 

* Accreditation application to the Board of Governors for 
Higher Education, State of Connecticut, for the intermedi- 
ate administrator/supervisor certification program is in 
process at the time of catalog prijiting. 

Concentration in Health Care 
Management 

This concentration is designed for those 
individuals currently in health care 
management or those who anticipate a 
career in health care management. Courses 
provide students with the conceptual and 
practical skills necessary for the manage- 
ment of a health care organization. 

Students choosing the health care 
concentration will take the core curriculum 
of nine courses and follow the health care 
concentration in lieu of their five elective 
courses. 

MG 640 Management of Health Care 

Organizations 
PA 641 Financial Management of Health 

Care Organizations 
PS 635 Law and Public Health 

Plus two of the following: 

E 659 Writing and Speaking for 

Professionals 
MG 630 Management Information Systems 

in Health Care 
PA 642 Health Care Delivery Systems 
PA 643 Health and Institutional Planning 
PA 644 Administration of Programs and 

Services for the Aged 
PA 645 Health Care Economics and Finance 
PA 646 Organization and Management of 

Long-Term Care Facilities 
PA 647 Alternative Health Care Delivery 

Systems 
PA 648 Contemporary Issues in Health Care 
PA 649 History and Development of Health 

Care Institutions 
PA 651 Health Care Ethics 
PA 652 Introduction to Managed Care 
PA 653 Cost Containment in Health Care 
PA 657 Health Care Reimbursements 
PA 659 Human Resource Planning in Health 

Care 
PA 662 Recruitment and Retention of Health 

Care Professionals 



104 



PA 664 Survey of Medical Group 

Management 
PA 670 Selected Topics 
Total credits: 15 

See page 84 for the M.S. degree program 
in Health Care Administration, page 51 for 
M.B.A. concentrations in this field and 
pages 112 and 115 for the certificates in 
health care management and long-term 
health care. 

Concentration in Long-Term 
Health Care 

This program is approved by the Depart- 
ment of Health Services, State of Connecti- 
cut, as a course of study in long-term health 
care. Students who complete these concen- 
tration courses are eligible to take the state 
licensing examination for long-term care 
administration, preparing individuals for 
participation in this area of expanding 
opportunities for health care practitioners. 

In the following sequence, PA 646 must 
be taken before or concurrently with PA 681; 
PA 682 must be taken after PA 681 and PA 
646. No waivers, substitutions or transfer 
credits will be permitted in this concentra- 
tion. 

Students choosing the long-term health 
care concentration will take the core 
curriculum of nine courses and the four 
courses in the concentration plus one 
additional elective course. 

PA 641 Financial Management of Health 

Care Organizations 
PA 646 Organization and Management of 

Long-Term Care Facilities 
PA 681 Long-Term Health Care Internship I 
PA 682 Long-Term Health Care 

Internship II 
Total credits: 12 

Concentration in Personnel 
and Labor Relations 

The concentration in personnel and labor 
relations is designed to meet the need for 
better trained personnel and labor relations 
specialists in the public sector. The public 



sector has experienced a growth in union 
membership, but has not had a correspond- 
ing growth in the capability to deal with 
public sector/ union relationships. In 
addition, the courses in this concentration 
will provide training for public administra- 
tors in areas such as employee motivation, 
organizational change and group dynamics. 

Students choosing this concentration 
will take the required core curriculum of 
nine courses and follow the personnel and 
labor relations concentration in lieu of their 
five elective courses. 

MG 645 Management of Human Resources, 
or SH 602 Safety Organization and 
Administration 

Plus two of the following:* 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 

EC 627 Economics of Labor Relations 

EC 687 Collective Bargaining 

Plus two of the following:** 

CO 621 Managerial Communication 
E 659 Writing and Speaking for 

Professionals 
MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 
P 620 Industrial Psychology 
P 628 The Interview 

P 632 Group Treatment and Family Therapy 
P 640 Industrial Motivation and Morale 
P 642 Organizational Change and 

Development 
P 643 The Psychology of Conflict 

Management I 
P 646 The Psychology of Conflict 

Management II 
Total credits: 15 

*Prerequisite for this group: EC 608 Economics for Public 
Administrators, or permission of the M.P.A. coordinator. 
**Prerequisite for this group: PA 625 Administrative 
Behavior, or permission of the M.P.A. coordinator. 

Taxation 

Coordinator: Robert E. Wnek, Professor of 
Tax Law, Accounting and Business Law; 
LL.M., Boston University School of Law; 
CPA 

The decision by government to utilize its 
taxing authority to pursue a variety of 



economic and social goals has led to the 
development of a complex body of tax law. 
Given the dynamic state of society's eco- 
nomic and social goals, the body of tax law 
characteristically exists in a continual state 
of change. 

The complexity of tax law is significant 
because of its influence on the economic 
decision-making process and because of its 
impact on the successful achievement of 
society's goals. Tax consequences have been 
and will continue to be an important 
financial consideration. 

Program Objectives 

In recognition of the above, a need to 
prepare technically competent individuals 
for careers in the field of taxation has 
developed. Owing to the complex and 
dynamic nature of tax law, it appears 
appropriate to conduct this preparation at 
an advanced level of inquiry with an 
emphasis upon examining the issues of 
current interest in taxation. Accordingly, the 
master of science program in taxation has 
been designed as a framework to accom- 
plish the following objectives: 

• to prepare students for technical compe- 
tence in understanding and interpreting 
tax law; 

• to familiarize students with the adminis- 
trative structure and procedures of the 
Internal Revenue Service; 

• to inform students about approaches to 
independent research in the field of tax 
law; and 

• to offer an understanding of the role tax 
law plays in social and economic policy 

Given the above objectives, the master of 
science program in taxation provides a 
framework through which advanced and 
timely tax training can be acquired by 
experienced professionals (accountants and 
attorneys) practicing in the field of taxation, 
as well as individuals seeking to prepare 
themselves for entry into career positions in 
taxation. 

Admission Policy 

Admission to the program is available to 
CPAs, attorneys and persons holding an 



Academic Programs 105 

undergraduate degree from an accredited 
institution, preferably, but not exclusively, 
in accounting or in business administration 
with a major in accounting. Persons holding 
other than the above degrees will be re- 
quired to take a number of selected under- 
graduate courses as a condition of admis- 
sion. Admission is based primarily on an 
applicant's undergraduate record; however, 
the promise of academic success is the 
essential factor for admission. In support of 
applications, applicants may submit their 
scores from the Graduate Management 
Admission Test (GMAT). An applicant may 
be required to take this test. 

M.S., Taxation 

A total of 36 credit hours, including a 
research project, is required for the master 
of science in taxation degree. Students must 
fulfill the requirements of either the corpo- 
rate taxation specialization or public 
taxation specialization. The transfer of 
credit from other institutions will be permit- 
ted subject to the Graduate School policy on 
transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this 
catalog. 

Corporate Taxation 
Specialization 

A 601 Individual Income Taxation 
A 602 Sales and Exchanges of Property 
A 604 Corporate Income Taxation I 
A 605 Corporate Income Taxation II 
A 607 Tax Accounting 
A 610 Consolidated Returns 
A 612 International Taxation 
A 614 Federal Tax Practice and Procedure 
A 615 Research Project in Federal Income 
Taxation 

Phis three of the following: 

A 603 Qualified Retirement Plans 

A 606 Subchapter S Corporations 

A 608 Estate and Gift Taxation 

A 609 State and Local Taxation 

A 611 Income Taxation of Estates and Trusts 

A 613 Taxation of Partnerships and Partners 

A 617 Estate Planning 

A 670 Selected Topics (Approved) 

Total credits: 36 



106 

Public Taxation Specialization 

A 601 Individual Income Taxation 
A 602 Sales and Exchanges of Property 
A 603 Qualified Retirement Plans 
A 604 Corporate Income Taxation I 
A 605 Corporate Income Taxation II 
A 607 Tax Accounting 
A 608 Estate and Gift Taxation 
A 614 Federal Tax Practice and Procedure 
A 615 Research Project in Federal Income 
Taxation 

Plus three of the following: 

A 606 Subchapter S Corporations 

A 609 State and Local Taxation 

A 610 Consolidated Returns 

A 611 Income Taxation of Estates and Trusts 

A 612 International Taxation 

A 613 Taxation of Partnerships and Partners 

A 617 Estate Planning 

A 670 Selected Topics (Approved) 

Total credits: 36 

For practitioners wishing to improve or 
update their tax skills but uncertain about 
pursuing a master's in taxation, two certifi- 
cates are offered: Taxation of Individuals 
(Option I) and Taxation of Corporations 
(Option II), as described on page 118. 

Practicing CPAs in need of continuing 
education credits and others seeking to 
expand their tax backgrounds should 
consider these alternatives. 



Graduate Certificates 

The Graduate School offers a number of 
graduate certificates designed as options for 
persons having a baccalaureate degree, or a 
master's degree, who want to enroll in a 
short, coherent course of study at the 
graduate level. Persons who may not yet be 
ready to commit themselves to a full-length 
graduate program, as well as those who 
already hold a graduate degree but want to 
pursue additional work in the same or 
another field, may find that a certificate 
provides the perfect alternative. 

Inasmuch as the certificates are not 
graduate degrees, students may transfer 
credits earned toward a certificate into a 
master's program at any time, subject to the 
requirements of the master's degree and the 
decision of the coordinator of the master's 
program, and to acceptance in the master's 
program. 

Although students who complete the 
requirements for a graduate certificate do 
not attend commencement, a certificate is 
awarded by the university to each student 
who qualifies. Two different types of 
certificates are awarded: 

• Senior Professional Certificates — 

awarded to students who already held a 
graduate/advanced degree at the time 
they began study for the certificate. 

• Professional Certificates — awarded to 
students who held an undergraduate/ 
baccalaureate degree at the time they 
began study for the certificate. 

A petition form requesting certification 
must be submitted to the Graduate Regis- 
trar following payment of the certificate 
petition fee. Also, students enrolled in 
master's degree programs who meet the 
qualifications for the awarding of a certifi- 
cate during pursuit of the master's degree, 
but prior to petitioning for graduation, may 
submit a petition for certification. When the 
coursework is reviewed and found to be 
complete and satisfactory, the appropriate 
certificate will be mailed to the student. A 
minimum QPR of 3.00 is required as satis- 



Academic Programs 107 

factory performance in courses taken at the 
university to qualify for the awarding of a 
graduate certificate. 

Certificate Requirements 

Required coursework consists of 12 to 21 
credits of graduate study, depending on the 
subject area selected. Students should 
contact the faculty adviser for the selected 
certificate for assistance in planning the 
course of study. 

Course waivers are not permitted for 
certificates; course substitutions may be 
granted by the certificate adviser. Course 
credits used to satisfy the requirements for 
one certificate may not be used toward 
completion of a second certificate. 

Students must meet all course prerequi- 
site requirements. Credits for courses taken 
as prerequisites for certificate courses must 
be taken outside/in addition to the certifi- 
cate requirements. 

Accounting 

Adviser: Robert G. McDonald, Associate 
Professor of Accounting, M.B.A., New 
York University; CMA, CIA, CFA, CPA 

The certificates in accounting are recom- 
mended to students and professionals 
whose education already includes an 
accounting degree and who wish to pursue 
accounting at an advanced level without 
necessarily enrolling in the full graduate 
program. They are especially recommended 
to certified public accountants who wish to 
obtain continuing professional education 
credits in an academic environment. 



Option I: Financial Accounting 

A 650 Advanced Accounting Theory* 
A 651 Financial Accounting Seminar 
A 652 Advanced Auditing 
A 653 Accounting for the Not-for-Profit 

Organization 
A 654 Financial Statements: Reporting and 

Analysis 
Total credits: 15 

*Prerequisite is A630 or tioo undergraduate intermediate 
accounting courses. 



108 



Option II: Managerial Accounting 

Any five ofthefolloiving: 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 

A 641 Accounting Information Systems 

A 642 Operational Auditing 

A 661 Managerial Accounting Seminar 

FI 601 Finance 

FI 602 Corporate Valuation and Business 

Strategy 
FI 610 Capital Market Theory 
Total credits: 15 

Option III: Accounting Information 
Systems 

A 641 Accounting Information Systems 

A 642 Operational Auditing 

A 652 Advanced Auditing 

Plus any tzvo accounting systems or computer 

science courses 
Total credits: 15 

Other courses may be substituted with 
consent of the adviser. 

Applications of Psychology 

Adviser: Thomas L. Mentzer, Professor of 
Psychology, Ph.D., Brown University 

The certificate in applications of psychol- 
ogy is designed to assist professionals who 
wish to acquire specific kinds of skills in 
areas dealing with human services or 
personnel functions. Study can be tailored 
to the needs of either one whose degree is in 
a nonpsychological field or one with a 
degree in psychology who wishes to 
broaden skills to a new area of psychology. 
Courses will be selected depending upon 
the student's career objectives and academic 
preparation. These courses may be from the 
following list, but other courses, indepen- 
dent study or special topics courses may be 
chosen where appropriate. 

Any five ofthefolloiving: 

P 610 Program Evaluation 

P 621 Behavior Modification I: Principles, 

Theories and Applications 
P 622 Behavior Modification II: Advanced 

Theory, Assessment and Application in 

Mental Retardation Settings 
P 623 Psychology of the Small Group 



P 625 Life Span Developmental Psychology 

P 628 The Interview 

P 629 Introduction to Psychotherapy and 

Counseling 
P 632 Group Treatment and Family Therapy 
P 636 Abnormal Psychology 
P 637 Mental Retardation: History, Theory 

and Practice 
P 638 Psychology of Communication and 

Opinion Change 
P 641 Personnel Development and Training 
P 642 Organizational Change and 

Development 
Total credits: 15 

Arson Investigation 

Adviser: Robert G. Sawyer, Associate 
Professor of Fire Science, M.S., 
University of New Haven 

This certificate offers an opportunity for 
students who hold the baccalaureate degree 
to continue their study of arson investiga- 
tion at the graduate level. 

Any four of the following: 

CJ 608 Law and Evidence 

FS 649 Fire Science Investigation and Arson 
Analysis (4 credits) 

FS 665 Legal Aspects of Fire and Arson 
Investigation 

FS 667 Fire and Building Codes, Standards 
and Practices 

FS 668 Fire and Casualty Insurance 
Practices 

FS 669 Dynamics, Evaluation and Preven- 
tion of Structural Fires 

FS 670 Selected Topics 

Total credits: 12-13 

Business Management 

Adviser: Judith A. Neal, Associate 

Professor of Management, Ph.D., Yale 
University 

This certificate is designed to develop 
students' conceptual knowledge and skills 
in formulating corporate strategy and in 
determining structural and resource re- 
quirements. The courses focus on concepts 
and processes useful in relation to general 



management and on functional responsibili- 
ties in coordinating and directing the 
organizational effort in our ever-changing 
economic environment. Students should 
note that MG 637 is prerequisite* to all of 
the following courses. Additional prerequi- 
sites are also required for some of the 
courses in the certificate; consult course 
descriptions elsew^here in this catalog. 

MG 663 Leadership and Team Building 
MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 
MG 655 Corporate Governance and 
Business Strategy 

Phis two of the following: 

MG 645 Management of Human Resources 
MG 650 Entrepreneurship 
MG 662 Organization Theory 
MG 667 Multicultural Issues in the 

Workplace 
MG 680 Current Topics in Business 

Administration 
Total credits: 15 

Other management courses may be 
permitted as substitutions with approval of 
the adviser. 

*M.P.A. students should complete 12 credits of 
the core curriculum in the M.P.A. program, 
including PA 601 and PA 625, as the prerequi- 
site for this certificate. 

Civil Engineering Design 

Adviser: David J. Wall, Professor of Civil 
and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., 
University of Pittsburgh 

The certificate in civil engineering de- 
sign provides professional studies beyond 
the baccalaureate level in the major disci- 
plines within civil engineering. The student, 
with the adviser, selects courses that best 
satisfy the student's professional interests. 
Areas of specialization are construction, 
geotechnical engineering, hydraulics and 
hydrology, and structural engineering. Ac- 
creditation application to the Board of Gov- 
ernors for Higher Education, State of Con- 
necticut, for this certificate in civil engineer- 
ing design is in process. 

Candidates for admission will be expect- 



Academic Programs 109 

ed to have an engineering degree from a 
program accredited by the Accreditation 
Board for Engineering and Technology, or 
demonstrated equivalent. Engineering 
degrees presented from foreign institutions 
will be evaluated individually. Candidates 
are required to complete six courses or a 
total of 18 credits for the certificate. Courses 
must be selected, with the adviser's ap- 
proval, from the following: 

CE 615 Groundwater Hydrology 

CE 620 Engineering Hydrology 

CE 621 Advanced Hydrology 

CE 623 Open Channel Hydraulics 

CE 624 Computer Applications in Hydrol- 
ogy/Hydraulics 

CE 629 Wood Engineering I 

CE 630 Reinforced Concrete Design 

CE 631 Structural Steel Design 

CE 633 Wood Engineering II 

CE 634 Prestressed Concrete Design 

CE 640 Structural Analysis 

CE 650 Soil Mechanics I 

CE 651 Soil Mechanics II 

CE 652 Foundation Engineering I 

CE 653 Foundation Engineering II 

CE 660 Project Planning 

CE 678 Computer Applications in Civil 
Engineering 

LA 673 Business Law I: Contracts and Sales 

Total credits: 18 

Computer and Information 
Science 

Adviser: Barun Chandra, Assistant 

Professor of Computer Science, Ph.D., 
University of Chicago 

This certificate provides a set of courses 
central to the study of computers and 
computing. 

CS 603 Introduction to Programming/ 

Pascal 
CS 610 Intermediate Programming/C 
CS 620 Data Structures 
CS 622 Database Systems 
CS 640 Computer Organization 
Total credits: 15 

Note: Students with good programming 
background may be able to take CS 610 



110 



directly, in which case they could select a 
substitute course for CS 603, in consultation 
with the certificate advisor. 

Criminal Justice/Security 
Management 

Adviser: William M. Norton, Associate 
Professor of Criminal Justice; Ph.D., 
Florida State University; J.D., University 
of Connecticut Law School 

This certificate, designed for those 
professionals who wish to enhance their 
knowledge and skills in security manage- 
ment, is open to all persons who hold an 
undergraduate four-year degree from an 
accredited institution of higher education. 

CJ 612 Criminal Justice Management 
CJ 669 Dynamics, Evaluation and Preven- 
tion of Structural Fires 
CJ 675 Private Security Law 
CJ 676 Security Management Seminar 
CJ 677 Private Security in Modem Society 
SH 602 Safety Organization and 

Administration 
Total credits: 18 

Finance 

Adviser: Robert M. Rainish, Associate 
Professor of Finance, Ph.D., City 
University of New York 

The goal of the finance certificate is to 
prepare individuals for careers in the 
financial services sector as well as modern 
corporate financial management. Certificate 
study stresses the understanding of the 
conceptual foundations of finance and the 
use of analytic techniques. Certificate 
candidates are required to meet the prereq- 
uisites for FI 60L 

Students should contact the finance 
adviser as soon as possible to plan course 
selection. A recommended course sequenc- 
ing for students interested in preparing for 
the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) 
examination is available from the adviser. 

FI 601 Finance 

FI 602 Corporate Valuation and Business 
Strategy 



FI 605 Data Evaluation and Modeling 

FI 610 Capital Market Theory 

FI 620 Capital Markets and the Valuation of 

Fixed Income Securities 
FI 625 Advanced Capital Market Issues, or 

FI 635 Advanced Corporate Financial 

Management Issues 
Plus two finance electives 
Total credits: 24 

Other courses may be substituted with 
the written approval of the finance adviser. 

Fire Science/Administration 
and Technology 

Adviser: Robert G. Sawyer, Associate 
Professor of Fire Science, M.S., 
University of New Haven 

This certificate in fire science provides a 
course of study for fire, public safety, 
insurance and security professionals who 
need to acquire the latest administrative 
and technological techniques in the field of 
fire science. 

Candidates for the professional certifi- 
cate in fire science administration and 
technology are required to have a B.S. 
degree in fire science or a related field. 
Candidates are required to complete seven 
courses or a total of 21 credits, including: 

FS 625 Chemistry of Fires and Explosions 
FS 667 Fire and Building Codes, Standards 

and Practices 
FS 668 Fire and Casualty Insurance Practices 
FS 669 Dynamics, Evaluation and Preven- 
tion of Structural Fires 

Plus any three of the following: 

CJ 677 Private Security in Modem Society 

CJ 695 Independent Study 

FS 670 Selected Topics 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 

SH 602 Safety Organization and 

Administration 
SH 620 Occupational Safety and Health Law 
Total credits: 21 



Forensic Science/Advanced 
Investigation 

Adviser: Howard A. Harris, Associate 

Professor of Forensic Science, Ph.D., Yale 
University; J.D., St. Louis University 

CJ 614 Survey of Forensic Science 

CJ 616 Advanced Crime Scene Investigation 

CJ 632 Advanced Investigation I 

CJ 633 Advanced Investigation II 

Plus two of the following: 

CJ 608 Law and Evidence 

CJ 610 Administration of Justice 

CJ 620 Advanced Criminalistics I 

CJ 640 Advanced Criminalistics II 

CJ 653 Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 

CJ 661 Medicolegal Investigation and 

Identification 
CJ 673 Biomedical Methods in Forensic 

Science 
PS 605 Criminal Law 
Total credits: 18 

Forensic Science/ 
Criminalistics 

Adviser: Howard A. Harris, Associate 

Professor of Forensic Science, Ph.D., Yale 
University; J.D., St. Louis University 

CJ 620 Advanced Criminalistics I 
CJ 621 Advanced Criminalistics I Labora- 
tory (1 credit) 
CJ 640 Advanced Criminalistics II 
CJ 641 Advanced Criminalistics II Labora- 
tory (1 credit) 
CJ 653 Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 
CJ 654 Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 

Laboratory (1 credit) 
CJ 673 Biomedical Methods in Forensic 

Science 
CJ 674 Biomedical Methods in Forensic 
Science Laboratory (1 credit) 

Plus one of the following: 

CH 621 Chemical Forensic Analysis with 

Laboratory (4 credits) 
CH 631 Advances in Analytic Chemistry 
CJ 610 Administration of Justice 
CJ 614 Survey of Forensic Science 



Academic Programs 111 

CJ 645 Drug Chemistry and Identification 
Total credits: 19-20 

Forensic Science/Fire Science 

Adviser: Howard A. Harris, Associate 
Professor of Forensic Science, Ph.D. , 
Yale University; J.D., St. Louis 
University 

CJ 640 Advanced Criminalistics II 

CJ 649 Fire Science Investigation and Arson 

Analysis (4 credits) 
CJ 653 Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 
FS 665 Legal Aspects of Fire and Arson 

Investigation 

Plus any two of the following: 

CH 625 Chemistry of Fires and Explosions 

CJ 614 Survey of Forensic Science 

CJ 667 Fire and Building Codes, Standards 

and Practices 
CJ 668 Fire and Casualty Insurance Practices 
CJ 669 Dynamics, Evaluation and Preven- 
tion of Structural Fires 
CJ 684 Fire /Accident Scene Reconstruction 
CJ 693 Criminal Justice Internship I 
Total credits: 19 

Geographical Information 
Systems 

Adviser: Michael P. Prisloe, Practitioner-in- 
Residence in Biology and Environmental 
Science, M.S., University of New Haven 

The certificate in geographical informa- 
tion systems (GIS) provides professional 
training in the technology and application 
of computerized cartography and spatially 
referenced databases. GIS is an increasingly 
important technology in environmental 
sciences, urban and regional planning and 
management, marketing, criminal justice, 
communications, and energy and natural 
resource protection. Coursework provides 
knowledge in basic and advanced GIS 
techniques, developing procedures and 
databases for specific applications, as well 
as technologies and analyses supporting 
GIS. The program is flexible in order to 
accommodate both students new to GIS and 
those who already have some experience 



112 



with this technology. 

Students entering this program are 
required to have a working knowledge of 
personal computers. 

EN 640 Introduction to Geographical 

Information Systems 
EN 641 Geographical Information System 

Techniques and Applications I 
EN 642 Geographical Information System 

Techniques and Applications II 
EN 643 Application of GIS 

in Environmental Science, or 

EN 690 Research Project 
Total credits: 12 

Students having previous GIS experience 
may substitute, with the adviser's approval, 
other courses for EN 640 and /or EN 641. 
Suggested substitutions, depending on a 
student's area of interest, may include, but 
are not limited to, the following: 

CJ 612 Criminal Justice Management 

EN 600 Environmental Geoscience 

EN 608 Landscape Ecology 

EN 620 Advanced Environmental Geology 

(4 credits) 
EN 690 Research Project 
EN 695 Independent Study I 
MK 641 Marketing Management 
PA 660 Urban Planning: Theory and Practice 

Health Care Management 

Adviser: Charles Coleman, Assistant 
Professor of Public Administration, 
M.P.A., West Virginia University 

This certificate will be useful for profes- 
sionals and decision makers employed in 
the public, private or nonprofit sectors of 
the health care field. Coursework will 
provide students with background and 
skills to enhance personal and professional 
development as well as the opportunity for 
organizational advancement. 

MG 640 Management of Health Care 

Organizations 
PA 641 Financial Management of Health 

Care Organizations 
PA 643 Health and Institutional Planning 
PS 635 Law and Public Health 



Plus one of the following: 

MG 630 Management Information Systems 

in Health Care 
PA 642 Health Care Delivery Systems 
PA 644 Administration of Programs and 

Services for the Aged 
PA 645 Health Care Economics and Finance 
PA 646 Organization and Management of 

Long-Term Care Facilities 
PA 647 Alternative Health Care Delivery 

Systems 
PA 648 Contemporary Issues in Health Care 
PA 649 History and Development of Health 

Care Institutions 
PA 651 Health Care Ethics 
PA 652 Introduction to Managed Care 
PA 653 Cost Containment in Health Care 
PA 657 Health Care Reimbursements 
PA 659 Human Resource Planning in Health 

Care 
PA 662 Recruitment and Retention of Health 

Care Professionals 
PA 664 Survey of Medical Group 

Management 
PA 670 Selected Topics 
Total credits: 15 

The certificate in long-term health care, 
leading to eligibility for the State of Con- 
necticut licensing examination in long-term 
care administration, is described on page 
115. 

Hospitality and Tourism 

Adviser: Sherie Brezina, Assistant Professor, 
Tourism and Travel Administration, 
M.A., University of Florida 

This certificate is designed to develop 
those conceptual skills necessary for the 
competent and profitable operation of a 
hospitality or tourism facility. It expands 
the student's awareness and underscores 
the importance of those operational factors 
which contribute to success in our service 
industries. 

HT 625 Hospitality and Tourism Human 

Resources 
HT 630 Dimensions in Tourism 
HT 645 Philosophy of Service 



HT 650 Hospitality and Tourism Marketing 
Electives (two courses) 
Total credits: 18 

(Course prerequisites and substitutions 
will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.) 

Human Resources 
Management 

Adviser: Laurel R. Goulet, Assistant 
Professor of Management, Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut 

This certificate is designed for the 
human resources professional or the indi- 
vidual in another field who aspires to work 
in human resources management. It pro- 
vides an overview of the field and an 
opportunity to study various subfunctions 
(such as training, compensation or indus- 
trial relations) in greater depth. 

MG 637 Management Process 

MG 645 Management of Human Resources 

Plus four of the following: 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 

EC 687 Collective Bargaining 

MG 663 Leadership and Team Building 

MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 

MG 665 Compensation Administration 

MG 667 Multicultural Issues in the 

Workplace 
MG 678 Personnel Management Seminar 
MG 679 Industrial Relations Seminar 
P 619 Organizational Behavior 
P 628 The Interview 

P 641 Personnel Development and Training 
P 642 Organizational Change and 

Development 
P 643 The Psychology of Conflict 

Management I 
PA 620 Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector 
SH 602 Safety Organization and 

Administration 
Total credits: 18 

Industrial Hygiene 

Adviser: Brad T. Garber, Professor of 

Occupational Safety and Health, Ph.D., 
University of California, Berkeley 



Academic Programs 113 

This certificate is designed for practicing 
professionals who wish to increase their 
knowledge and skills in industrial hygiene 
as well as for persons who wish to enter this 
field. Courses of study are individually 
tailored to the specific occupational needs 
of each applicant. 

A total of 15 credits in industrial hy- 
giene, toxicology and related fields must be 
completed. Students, in consultation with 
the adviser, will design a course of study 
consisting of the following offerings or 
approved substitutes. 

Any five of the following: 

SH 602 Safety Organization and 

Administration 
SH 608 Industrial Hygiene Practices 
SH 611 OSH Research Methods and 

Techniques 
SH 615 Toxicology 
SH 660 Industrial Ventilation 
SH 661 Microcomputers in Occupational 

Safety and Health 
SH 665 Industrial Hygiene Measurements 
Sh 667 Control of Occupational Health 

Hazards 
Total credits: 15 

International Business 

Adviser: Michael Kublin, Professor of 
Marketing and International Business, 
Ph.D., New York University 

This certificate is designed to prepare 
managers to deal with the current problems 
and methods of analysis related to interna- 
tional business. This includes basic tech- 
niques and skills, such as adapting to new 
political and cultural environments, which 
are not normally covered by traditional 
courses. 

IB 643 International Business 

Plus four of the following: 

EC 641 International Economics, or 

FI 632 International Financial 

Management 
IB 645 Comparative International Business 

Environments 



114 



IB 650 International Business Negotiating 

IB 651 International Marketing 

IB 652 Multinational Business Management 

IB 660 East and Southeast Asian Business 
Systems 

IB 670 Selected Topics 

IB 693 Internship 

MK 639 Marketing Research and Informa- 
tion Systems 

Total credits: 15 

International Relations 

Adviser: Natalie J. Ferringer, Professor of 
Political Science, Ph.D., University of 
Virginia 

This certificate is designed to introduce 
students to elements of international life 
that are relevant to the growth of a global 
political-economic system. Courses will 
provide increased knowledge and aware- 
ness in the area of international relations for 
corporate executives, teachers and profes- 
sionals. Factors such as power, diplomacy, 
law, trade, monetary affairs, multinational 
corporations, investment, aid and differing 
cultural and geographical characteristics 
will be examined. 

PS 606 Advanced International Relations 
PS 641 The Politics of the World Economy 

Plus two of the following: 

HS 607 World History in the Twentieth 

Century 
HS 670 Selected Topics 
HS 695 Independent Study 
IB 643 International Business 
PS 603 International Law 
PS 604 Human Rights and the Law 
PS 625 Transnational Legal Structures 
PS 628 Change and Government 
PS 645 Government and the Industrial 

Sector 
PS 670 Selected Topics 
PS 695 Independent Study 
Total credits: 12 



Legal Studies 

Adviser: Natalie J. Ferringer, Professor of 
Political Science, Ph.D., University of 
Virginia 

This certificate is designed to provide 
the student with a background in and 
orientation to constitutional and legal issues 
in contemporary American and global 
societies by exploring basic constitutional 
principles and the levels at which legal 
conflicts may arise. Students will be intro- 
duced to basic principles and practices in 
the American legal system, including some 
elements that pertain to international 
activity, and will learn to recognize areas of 
potential legal conflict at all levels of the 
system — legislative, judicial, administrative 
and regulatory. 

PS 601 Constitutional Law 
PS 610 Legal Methods I 
PS 655 Conflict Resolution 

Plus one of the following: 

LA 673 Business Law I: Contracts and Sales 

PS 602 Civil Liberties and Rights 

PS 603 International Law 

PS 604 Human Rights and the Law 

PS 605 Criminal Law 

PS 608 The Legislative Process 

PS 612 Contracts, Torts and the Practice of 

Law 
PS 616 Urban Government 
PS 617 Law, Science and Ethics 
PS 625 Transnational Legal Structures 
PS 626 Decision Making in the Political 

Process 
PS 628 Change and Government 
PS 633 The Political Process and the Aged 
PS 635 Law and Public Health 
PS 640 Law and Education 
PS 645 Government and the Industrial 

Sector 
PS 670 Selected Topics 
PS 695 Independent Study 
Total credits: 12 



Logistics 

Adviser: Alexis N. Sommers, Professor of 
Industrial Engineering, Ph.D., Purdue 
University 

This certificate provides a basic working 
knowledge of logistics and background for 
certification in the discipline. Although an 
old field of study traditionally associated 
with the military, logistics has emerged as 
an important management specialty in 
organizations dealing with complex sys- 
tems and large, multiphase projects. Mod- 
ern logistics is the science of making sure 
that needs are met when they occur, at a 
reasonable resource expenditure. This 
necessitates customer requirements plan- 
ning, design-to-cost concepts, optimal 
system acquisition, life cycle analysis, 
transportation and distribution, and field 
support networks. Commercial applications 
occur in multisite manufacturing, JIT 
relationships, warranty management and 
technical support of both customers and 
supplies. 

LG 660 Logistics Technology and 
Management 

Plus three of the following: 

IE 615 Transportation and Distribution 
LG 663 Logistics in Acquisition and 

Manufacturing 
LG 665 Integrated Logistics Support 

Analysis 
LG 669 Life Cycle Cost Analysis 
MG 638 Cost Benefit Management 
Total credits: 12 

Logistics/Advanced 

Adviser: Alexis N. Sommers, Professor of 
Industrial Engineering, Ph.D., Purdue 
University 

This certificate provides advanced 
training for logistics professionals who seek 
to continue their education. For the logistics 
professional employed in the defense 
industry, a working knowledge of logistics 
strategy, new logistics research and the 
impact of high technology is an essential 



Academic Programs 115 

part of professional development. This 
certificate is open to those students who 
have a background in logistics, such as 
completion of the university's M.B.A. 
program with a concentration in logistics or 
equivalent logistics training. 

LG 672 Designing for Logistics Support 
LG 673 Human Engineering in Logistics 

Support 
LG 675 Logistics Policy 
LG 676 Logistics Products 
Total credits: 12 

Long-Term Health Care 

Adviser: Charles Coleman, Assistant 
Professor of Public Administration, 
M.P.A., West Virginia University 

This certificate is approved by the 
Department of Health Services, State of 
Connecticut, as a course of study in long- 
term health care. Students who complete 
this 12-credit course of study are eligible to 
take the state licensing examination for 
long-term care administration, preparing 
individuals for participation in this area of 
expanding opportunities for health care 
practitioners. 

In the following sequence, PA 646 must 
be taken before or concurrently with PA 681; 
PA 682 must be taken after PA 681 and PA 
646. No waivers, substitutions or transfer 
credits will be permitted for this certificate. 

PA 641 Financial Management of Health 

Care Organizations 
PA 646 Organization and Management of 

Long-Term Care Facilities 
PA 681 Long-Term Health Care Internship I 
PA 682 Long-Term Health Care 

Internship II 
Total credits: 12 

Marketing 

Adviser: David J. Morris, Jr., Professor of 
Marketing, Ph.D., Syracuse University 

The certificate in marketing allows the 
student to acquire a deeper understanding 
of marketing phenomena and to develop 
analytic skills. Special emphasis is given to 



216 



the development of content knowledge and 
skills necessary for operating managers of 
the marketing function. It is suggested that 
Marketing Management and Marketing 
Research and Information Systems, if taken, 
be preceded by other courses in the pro- 
gram. Note that MK 609 and MG 637 are 
prerequisites for the certificate. 

Option I: Marketing 

MK 641 Marketing Management 

Plus one course in international business and 
three of the following: 

MK 616 Buyer Behavior 
MK 632 Nonprofit and Services Marketing 
MK 638 Competitive Marketing Strategy 
MK 639 Marketing Research and 

Information Systems 
MK 643 Product Management 
MK 645 Distribution Strategy 
MK 680 Marketing Workshop 
Total credits: 15 

Option II: Quantitative Techniques in 
Marketing 

This specialization will enable the 
student to utilize the latest quantitative 
methods to redefine and to plan the corpo- 
rate scope of a business. It is critical for 
problem solving at both strategic and 
tactical levels. Particular emphasis is placed 
on marketing distribution problems. 

CS 606 Technical Programming/ FORTRAN 
QA 604 Probability and Statistics 

Plus three of the following: 

IE 615 Transportation and Distribution 
MK 639 Marketing Research and 

Information Systems 
MK 641 Marketing Management 
QA 607 Forecasting 
QA 675 Computer- Aided Multivariate 

Analysis 
Total credits: 15 

Mental Retardation Services 

Adviser: Robert Hoffnung, Professor of 
Psychology, Ph.D., University of 
Cincinnati 

This certificate encompasses those 



courses from the mental retardation services 
concentration in the master's program in 
community psychology which are most 
directly related to the graduate training of 
professionals in the field of mental retarda- 
tion. The certificate emphasizes those skill 
areas, particularly behavior modification 
techniques, which are needed by 
professionals working in residential facili- 
ties for mentally retarded adults. 

P 605 Survey of Community Psychology 
P 621 Behavior Modification I: Principles, 

Theories and Applications 
P 622 Behavior Modification II: Advanced 

Theory, Assessment and Application in 

Mental Retardation Settings 
P 637 Mental Retardation: History, Theory 

and Practice 
Total credits: 12 

Occupational Safety 

Adviser: Brad T. Garber, Professor of 

Occupational Safety and Health, Ph.D., 
University of California, Berkeley 

This certificate is designed to fit the 
needs of professionals with or without an 
advanced degree who wish to increase their 
knowledge and skills in the dynamic field 
of occupational safety as well as to offer 
training to persons who wish to enter the 
field. The wide variety of courses allows 
students to tailor their study to meet 
individual needs. 

Students will select 15 credits in the 
safety and health field in consultation with 
the adviser, designing a course of study 
consisting of the following offerings or 
approved substitutes. 

Any five of the following: 

SH 602 Safety Organization and 

Administration 
SH 605 Industrial Safety Engineering 
SH 608 Industrial Hygiene Practices 
SH 611 OSH Research Methods and 

Techniques 
SH 615 Toxicology 
SH 620 Occupational Safety and Health 

Law 
SH 630 Product Safety and Liability 
SH 660 Industrial Ventilation 



SH 661 Microcomputers in Occupational 

Safety and Health 
SH 665 Industrial Hygiene Measurements 
Total credits: 15 

Public Administration 

Adviser: Charles Coleman, Assistant 
Professor of Public Administration, 
M.P.A., West Virginia University 

This certificate is designed to provide 
training at the graduate level for people in 
public service. Coursework focuses on the 
analytic, quantitative, administrative and 
managerial knowledge and skills needed to 
meet the complex problems and 
responsibilities of government agencies and 
organizations. 

PA 601 Principles of Public Administration 
PA 602 Public Policy Formulation and 

Implementation 
PA 611 Research Methods in Public 

Administration 
PA 620 Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public 

Sector 
PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 

Plus one of the following: 

EC 608 Economics for Public Administrators 
PA 604 Communities and Social Change 
PA 625 Administrative Behavior 
PA 670 Selected Topics 
Total credits: 18 

Public Management 

Adviser: Charles Coleman, Assistant 
Professor of Public Administration, 
M.P.A., West Virginia University 

This certificate in public management is 
designed to provide a broad overview of 
the most current thinking in public manage- 
ment. Courses emphasize conceptual and 
analytic skill building. Students may select 
either a survey of the field or public person- 
nel management. 

Option I: Survey of the Field 

Any five of the following: 

EC 665 Urban and Regional Economic 
Development 



Academic Programs 117 

PA 611 Research Methods in Public 

Administration 
PA 620 Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public 

Sector 
PA 625 Administrative Behavior 
PA 630 Fiscal Management for Local 

Government 
PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 
PA 660 Urban Planning: Theory and 

Practice 
PS 608 The Legislative Process 
Total credits: 15 

Option II: Public Personnel Management 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 

MG 645 Management of Human Resources 

PA 620 Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public 

Sector 
PA 625 Administrative Behavior 

Plus one of the following: 

MG 665 Compensation Administration 
P 643 The Psychology of Conflict 

Management I 
P 646 The Psychology of Conflict 

Management II 
Total credits: 15 

Public Safety Management 

Adviser: Robert G. Sawyer, Associate 
Professor of Fire Science, M.S., 
University of New Haven 

This certificate includes additional 
courses and a further educational goal for 
those professionals who seek additional 
study in the field of public safety. 

FS 681 Seminar /Research Project in Public 
Safety Management I 

FS 682 Seminar/ Research Project in Public 
Safety Management II 

FS 683 Seminar /Research Project on Com- 
parative Public Safety Systems 

Plus one of the following: 

CO 631 Public Information Dynamics 
EC 665 Urban and Regional Economic 

Development 
MG 645 Management of Human Resources 



118 

PA 620 Personnel Administration and 
Collective Bargaining in the Public 
Sector 

PA 630 Fiscal Management for Local Gov- 
ernment 

PA 660 Urban Planning: Theory and Practice 

PS 635 Law and Public Health 

SH 602 Safety Organization and 
Administration 

SH 620 Occupational Safety and Health Law 

Total credits: 12 

Taxation 

Adviser: Robert E. Wnek, Professor of Tax 
Law, Accounting and Business Law; 
LL.M., Boston University School of Law; 
CPA 

This certificate is for practitioners who 
wish to improve or update their tax skills, 
including practicing CPAs needing continu- 
ing education credits and others seeking to 
expand their tax backgrounds. 

Option I: Taxation of Individuals 

A 601 Individual Income Taxation 

A 602 Sales and Exchanges of Property 

A 603 Qualified Retirement Plans 

A 608 Estate and Gift Taxation 

Plus one taxation elective 

Total credits: 15 

Option II: Taxation of Corporations 

A 604 Corporate Income Taxation I 
A 605 Corporate Income Taxation II 
A 610 Consolidated Returns 
Plus two taxation electives 
Total credits: 15 

Other courses may be substituted with 
consent of the adviser. 

Technology Management 

Adviser: Neal Gersony, Assistant Professor 
of Management, Ph.D., Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute 

Distinctive competence in the manage- 
ment of technology provides the competi- 
tive edge that individuals and organizations 
need to excel in today's high-technology 
climate. This certificate links technology 
and management disciplines to address the 



planning, development and implementation 
of technological capabilities to shape and 
accomplish the strategic and operational 
objectives of an organization. 

MG 637 Management Process 
MG 641 Managing the Quality Process 
MG 642 New Business Development from 
Technology 

Plus two of the following: 

MG 638 Cost Benefit Management 

MG 650 Entrepreneurship 

MG 655 Corporate Governance and 

Business Strategy 
MG 663 Leadership and Team Building 
MK 643 Product Management 
Total credits: 15 

Telecommunications 
Management 

Adviser: Jerry L. Allen, Professor of 

Communication, Ph.D., Southern Illinois 
University at Carbondale 

This certificate is designed to prepare 
telecommunication managers to deal with 
the current problems and methods of 
analysis pertinent to this fast-changing field 
and to end users, suppliers and common 
carriers of telecommunications services and 
facilities. Courses emphasize conceptual 
factors and analytic skills. 

CO 640 Communications Technologies* 
CO 643 Telecommunications Policy and 
Strategy 

Plus any three of the following: 

CO 641 Competition and Regulation in 
Telecommunications 

CO 642 Management of Telecommunica- 
tions Organizations 

CS 642 Computer Networks and Data 
Communication 

LA 673 Business Law I: Contracts and Sales 

MG 638 Cost Benefit Management 

Total credits: 15 

*Studenls who have had the eauivalent of CO 640, either 
through zvork experience or educational courses given by a 
common carrier, may substitute another elective from the 
elective list or another course with the consent of the 
adviser. 



COURSES 



Course descriptions are ar- 
ranged alphabetically by the 
course prefix code letters, as 
listed below. For the purpose of 
brevity, course descriptions may 
consist of sentence fragments. 
Unless otherwise specified, all 
graduate courses carry three 
credit hours. 



A 

A 

B 

BI 

c 

CE 



CH 
Q 
CM 
CO 

cs 



E 

EC 
ED 
EE 

EN 
EXID 



Accounting and 
Taxation 



Biology 



Civil and 

Environmental 

Engineering 
Chemistry 
Criminal Justice 
Chemical Engineering 
Communication 
Computer Science 



English 
Economics 
Education 
Electrical and 
Computer Engineering 
Environmental Science 
Executive M.B.A. 



PI 

FS 


Finance 
Fire Science 


P 
PA 


Psychology 

Public Administration/ 
Health Care 






PH 


Physics 


H 




PL 
PS 


Philosophy 
Political Science 


HS 
HT 


History 

Hospitality and 
Tourism 






HU 


Humanities 


Q 




I 




QA 


Quantitative Analysis 


IB 


International Business 


S 




IE 

L 


Industrial Engineering 


SH 
SO 


Occupational Safety 
and Health 

Sociology 



LA 
LG 



M 

M 

MB 
ME 

MG 
MK 

N 

NU 



Business Law 
Logistics 



Mathematics 
Molecular Biology 
Mechanical 

Engineering 
Management 
Marketing 



Nutrition 



120 



Accounting and 
Taxation 



A 601 Individual Income 
Taxation 

A study of tax policy and the fun- 
damental principles of the federal 
income tax law taught at an ad- 
vanced level of inquiry. Coverage 
entails the key concepts of gross 
income, adjusted gross income, 
deductions, exemptions, credits 
and special tax computations, 
with attention given to the provi- 
sions of the Internal Revenue 
Code affecting individual taxpay- 
ers. 

A 602 Sales and Exchanges 
of Property 

Prerequisite: A 601. A continu- 
ation of Individual Income Taxa- 
tion emphasizing the fundamen- 
tal principles concerning disposi- 
tions of property: analysis of ba- 
sis, recognition of gain or loss, 
capital asset transactions, non- 
recognition exchanges and depre- 
ciation recapture. 

A 603 Qualified Retirement 
Plans 

Prerequisite: A 602. An exami- 
nation of the fundamentals of the 
federal taxation of deferred com- 
pensation. The course will focus 
on qualified retirement plans and 
individual and self-employed re- 
tirement plans as developed by 
the Employment Retirement In- 
come Security Act of 1974 and 
subsequent legislation. Deferred 
executive compensation arrange- 
ments, stock options, restricted 
property, tax deferred annuities 
and various employee benefit 
plans will also be reviewed. 

A 604 Corporate Income 
Taxation I 

Prerequisite: A 602. A foundation 
course analyzing the basic federal 
income tax provisions affecting 
corporations and shareholders. 
Course coverage includes organi- 



zation of the corporation, corpo- 
rate capital structure, corporate 
distributions, stock redemptions, 
bail-out techniques and liq- 
uidations. 

A 605 Corporate Income 
Taxation II 

Prerequisite: A 604. Advanced 
study in the corporate tax area in- 
cluding Subchapter S corpora- 
tions, collapsible corporations, ac- 
cumulated earnings and personal 
holding company taxes, affiliated 
corporations, carryover of corpo- 
rate tax attributes, and corporate 
reorganizations and divisions. 

A 606 Subchapter S 
Corporations 

Prerequisite: A 605. Advanced re- 
view, through case studies, of fed- 
eral income and estate tax con- 
sequences and tax planning op- 
portunities of operating as a Sub- 
chapter S corporation. Topics in- 
clude eligibility, election, revoca- 
tion and termination; taxation of 
the corporation and the stock- 
holders; distribuhons; stock liqui- 
dations, redemptions and 
dispositions; estate planning for 
the stockholders. 

A 607 Tax Accounting 

Prerequisite: A 601. Investigation 
of such areas as: problems of allo- 
cating income and deductions to 
the proper tax year, permissible 
tax accounting methods, 
depreciation, inventory methods, 
individual net operating losses, 
change in accounting methods, 
and comparison of business and 
tax accounting principles. 

A 608 Estate and Gift 
Taxation 

A comprehensive introduction to, 
and analysis of, the federal estate 
and gift tax laws including basic 
principles of estate planning. Pro- 
cedures for preparation of the es- 
tate and gift tax returns are 
treated. Coverage is given to state 
death and inheritance taxes. 



A 609 State and Local 
Taxation 

Tax problems encountered at the 
state and local level by businesses 
engaged in interstate commerce. 
Federal limitations on the taxa- 
tion of multistate enterprises and 
jurisdictional problems are exam- 
ined. Specific areas covered are: 
license to do business, net in- 
come, franchise, gross receipts, 
property, and sales and use taxes. 
Apportionment problems are ex- 
amined in detail. 

A 610 Consolidated Returns 

Prerequisite: A 604. A thorough 
analysis of the federal con- 
solidated tax return provisions in- 
cluding eligibility and whether to 
file a consolidated return, inter- 
company transactions and defer- 
ral concepts, basis in the disposi- 
tion of stock of a subsidiary, com- 
putation of earnings and profits, 
mechanics of preparing the con- 
solidated return. 

A 611 Income Taxation of 
Estates and Trusts 

Prerequisite: A 602. Federal in- 
come taxation of estates, trusts, 
grantors and beneficiaries. Topics 
are simple and complex trusts, 
throwback rules, taxable and dis- 
tributable net income, assignment 
of income concepts and income in 
respect of a decedent, preparation 
of the estate and trust returns. 

A 612 International Taxation 

Prerequisite: A 604. Consideration 
of the federal income tax treat- 
ment of nonresident aliens and 
foreign corporations and the for- 
eign income of U.S. residents and 
domestic corporations; compari- 
son of alternative methods of en- 
gaging in operations abroad; for- 
eign tax credit; allocations under 
code Section 482; Section 367 rul- 
ings; effect of tax treaties. 

A 613 Taxation of 
Partnerships and Partners 

Prerequisite: A 602. A study of the 
federal income tax problems en- 



Courses 121 



countered in the formation and 
operation of a partnership includ- 
ing computations of taxable in- 
come, sale of a partnership inter- 
est, withdrawal of a partner, 
death or retirement of a partner, 
distribution of partnership assets 
and basis adjustments. 

A 614 Federal Tax Practice 
and Procedure 

Prerequisite: A 601. A study of the 
history and organization of the 
Internal Revenue Service, the se- 
lection of returns for audit and the 
review steps at the administrative 
level. Code provisions covered 
will include: filing requirements, 
statutory notices, restriction on 
assessment, statute of limitations, 
refund procedures, waivers, clos- 
ing agreements, protests and rul- 
ings. 

A 615 Research Project in 
Federal Income Taxation 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours in 
taxation. A study of the tech- 
niques and tools of tax research. 
Reference sources include: tax 
loose-leaf services, I.R.S. cumula- 
tive bulletins, court cases, con- 
gressional committee reports, 
textbooks, published articles. Re- 
search projects will be assigned 
for written submission. 

A 616 Taxation for 
Management 

Introduction to federal taxation 
and its impact on business deci- 
sion making. Overview of the ba- 
sics of federal taxation, its traps 
and tax planning opportunities. 
Complete overview of all areas of 
federal taxation to understand the 
tax planning for personal and 
business situations and the inter- 
relationship of tax planning deci- 
sions. Areas of federal taxation 
covered are: individual income 
taxes, corporation income taxes, S 
corporations, partnerships, in- 
come taxation of estates and 
trusts, estate and gift taxes. Not 
open to M.S. in taxation program 
students. 



A 617 Estate Planning 

Prerequisite: A 608. The essential 
elements of estate planning under 
current law. Includes gift plan- 
ning as well as death transfers in 
the general context of family fi- 
nancial planning; also, personal 
planning considerations, as well 
as tax savings. State succession 
taxes will be reviewed. 

A 621 Managerial 
Accounting 

Accounting analysis for the 
managerial functions of planning, 
controlling and evaluating the 
performance of the business firm. 

A 630 Topics in Corporate Fi- 
nancial Reporting 

Prerequisite: A 621 or equivalent. 
A selected examination of corpo- 
rate financial accounting topics 
including revenue recognition, 
current assets, investments, 
leases, pensions, earnings per 
share, foreign currency transla- 
tion and business combinations. 
This course may not be taken for 
credit by M.S. Accounting program 
students. 

A 641 Accounting 
Information Systems 

Prerequisite: A 621. An exami- 
nation of the function and limita- 
tions of internal accounting infor- 
mation systems and their 
relationship to other decision-ori- 
ented business information sys- 
tems. 

A 642 Operational Auditing 

Prerequisite: A 621. Analysis of 
the principles underlying the 
functions of auditing within a 
firm. Will impart a working 
knowledge of techniques used in 
business audits. 

A 650 Advanced Accounting 
Theory 

Prerequisite: A 630 or six hours of 
intermediate accounting. Theo- 
retical aspects of accepted ac- 
counting principles and their sig- 
nificance as a frame of reference 



for the valuation of accounting 
practices. Major focus on the role 
of regulatory agencies and profes- 
sional accounting organizations 
with regard to their influences on 
accounting theory and practice. 

A 651 Financial Accounting 
Seminar 

Prerequisite: A 650. An exami- 
nation and evaluation of current 
literature in external accounting 
issues and related fields. 

A 652 Advanced Auditing 

Prerequisite: three hours of au- 
diting. An analysis of the contem- 
porary problems surrounding the 
attest function performed by the 
professional independent audi- 
tor. EDP auditing is examined in 
depth. 

A 653 Accounting for the 
Not-for-Profit Organization 

Prerequisite: six hours of inter- 
mediate accounting. An intensive 
examination of the contemporary 
views toward financial reporting 
for not-for-profit organizations. 

A 654 Financial Statements: 
Reporting and Analysis 

Prerequisite: A 621. Techniques in 
analyzing financial statements by 
creditors and equity investors for 
the short and long term. Review 
of accounting principles as re- 
flected in the financial state- 
ments. 

A 661 Managerial 
Accounting Seminar 

Prerequisite: A 621. Case course 
covering advanced issues of man- 
agement accounting. Develops 
topics introduced in A 621. 

A 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
hcular interest to the students and 
instructor. Course may be taken 
more than once. 

A 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or 
permission of the instructor. Inde- 



122 



pendent study under the super- 
vision of an adviser. 

A 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

A 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

A 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

A 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Biology 



BI 605 Biostatistics 

A non-calculus-based course 
which includes basic concepts of 
probability and statistics. These 
concepts are applied to problems 
in human biology, industrial/oc- 
cupational health and epidemiol- 
ogy. Introduction to and use of the 
computer package SPSSx for data 
analysis. (See also M 605.) 



Civil and 

Environmental 

Engineering 

CE 601 Physical-Chemical 
Treatment of Aqueous 
Wastes 

Analysis of physical and chemical 
processes in natural and engi- 
neered systems for water pollu- 
tion control. Unit processes cov- 
ered include, but are not limited 
to: aeration and gas transfer, sedi- 
mentation, filtration, coagula- 
tion/flocculation, adsorption, 
chemical stabilization, ion ex- 
change, disinfection. Design 
methodologies and operational 



aspects of treatment are also con- 
sidered. 

CE 602 Biological Treatment 
of Aqueous Wastes 

This course provides an in-depth 
study of principles of biological 
treatment of aquatic wastes (mu- 
nicipal, industrial and /or hazard- 
ous). Suspended and attached 
growth processes commonly in 
use are covered. Emphasis is 
given to design and operational 
aspects of activated sludge, trick- 
ling filters and rotating 
biocontactors. On-site treatment 
processes are also covered. 

CE 603 Contaminant Fate 
and Transport in the 
Environment 

This course covers the fundamen- 
tal principles of contaminant be- 
havior in the environment. Con- 
taminant physical-chemical prop- 
erties, transport and transforma- 
tion mechanisms affecting con- 
taminant distribution among air, 
water and solid domains are stud- 
ied in depth. Topics covered in- 
clude, but are not limited to: en- 
vironmental interface equilibria; 
advective and diffusional trans- 
port; biochemical exchange in at- 
mospheric, aquatic and terrestrial 
domains. Environmental mod- 
eling is also considered. 

CE 605 Solid Waste 
Management 

Characteristics, volumes, col- 
lection and disposal of solid 
waste and refuse. Design of pro- 
cessing, recycling and recovery 
equipment; landfill design and 
operation; resource recovery; 
incineration. 

CE 606 Environmental Law 
and Legislation 

Review and techniques of en- 
forcement of state and federal 
pollution control laws and regula- 
tions; effects on waste treatment 
criteria and design and evalua- 
tion of municipal ordinances; 



preparation of environmental 
assessments and impact state- 
ments. 

CE 607 Water Pollution 
Control Processes 

Prerequisite: CH 601. This course is 
open to non-engineering students 
only. Study of physical, chemical 
and biological processes em- 
ployed for pollution control. Pro- 
cesses cover the removal of sus- 
pended, colloidal and dissolved 
phases of pollution. 

CE 610 Pollution Prevention 
Management Technologies 

The first half of this course fo- 
cuses on methods to implement a 
pollution prevention hierarchy, 
developing management sup- 
port, identifying pollution pre- 
vention opportunities, assem- 
bling a pollution prevention team 
and developing economic justifi- 
cation for potential opportunities. 
The second half of the course fo- 
cuses on various technologies 
available for a wide variety of 
pollutants, including a review of 
methods that can be used to inte- 
grate the technologies within ex- 
isting processes with a facility. 

CE 612 Advanced 
Wastewater Treatment 

Prerequisite: CE 602. Theories 
and principles of advanced sew- 
age treatment including nutrient 
removal, demineralization, distil- 
lation, ozonization, carbon filtra- 
tion, ion exchange, nitrification; 
design of facilities; upgrading 
secondary plants. 

CE 613 Industrial 
Wastewater Control 

Prerequisites: CE 601, CE 602. 
Characteristics of industrial 
wastes-volumes, sources, types; 
methods of volume reduction, 
waste segregation, recovery, recy- 
cling and waste treatment. 

CE 614 Surface Water 
Quality Management 

Prerequisite: CE 620. Determi- 



nation of controls that must be in- 
stituted to achieve specific water 
quality objectives. Waste load al- 
location as principal management 
tool, requiring knowledge of re- 
sponse of a system to waste load 
inputs. Input /response relation- 
ships for three different surface 
water systems: rivers and 
streams; lakes; estuaries. Related 
topics: dissolved oxygen analysis, 
indicator bacteria and eutrophica- 
tion. 

CE 615 Groundwater 
Hydrology 

Prerequisite: undergraduate 
courses in fluid mechanics and 
soil mechanics. Study of funda- 
mental principles governing fluid 
flow in porous and fractured me- 
dia provides necessary foun- 
dation for advanced studies in 
hydrogeology and contaminant 
hydrology. Includes Darcy's law, 
the continuity equation, aquifers, 
flow in the saturated zone, flow 
nets, wells and well hydraulics, 
flow in fractures, flow in the un- 
saturated zone, groundwater 
modeling. 

CE 616 Contaminant 
Hydrology 

Prerequisite: CE 615. Behavior of 
contaminants in the subsurface. 
Emphasis on physical, chemical 
and biological processes that de- 
termine fate of a contaminant: ad- 
vertion, diffusion, adsorption, 
mechanical dispersion, bio- 
chemical reactions. Quantitative 
relationships for predictive 
framework. Applications in- 
cluding site characterization, 
remediation, wellhead protecHon, 
flow and transport modeling, 
groundwater waste disposal. 

CE 617 Wastewater 
Residuals Management 

Prerequisites: CE 601 and CE 602, 
or permission of instructor. An 
overview of rules and regulaHons 
affecting treatment and disposal 
of wastewater residuals. Quanti- 
tative and qualitive characteris- 



tics are considered. Treatment 
processes for preliminary opera- 
tions, thickening, chemical/bio- 
logical stabilization, condition- 
ing, disinfection, dewatering, 
drying, thermal reduction and 
ultimate disposal are covered ex- 
tensively and design procedures 
are outlined. Case studies address 
beneficial use of wastewater re- 
siduals. 

CE 618 Hazardous Waste 
Treatment 

Prerequisites: CE 601 and 602, or 
permission of instructor. A review 
of the historical, legislative and 
social framework of hazardous 
waste issues. Physical, chemical, 
biological and thermal processes 
used for decontamination of haz- 
ardous wastes and hazardous 
waste sites are studied exten- 
sively. Specific remedial in-situ/ 
ex-situ technologies such as soil 
vapor extraction, soil washing, 
incineration, bioremediation, im- 
mobilization and chemical extrac- 
tion are covered. Includes various 
laboratory and field case studies. 

CE 620 Engineering 
Hydrology 

Prerequisites: undergraduate course 
in hydraulics; computer literacy. 
Theory, methods and applications 
of hydrology to contemporary en- 
gineering problems. Methods of 
data collection and analysis as 
well as design procedures are pre- 
sented for typical engineering 
problems. Specific topics to be 
considered within this framework 
include the rainfall/runoff pro- 
cess, hydrograph analysis, hydro- 
logic routing, urban runoff, storm 
water models and flood frequency 
analysis. 

CE 621 Advanced 
Hydrology 

Prerequisite: CE 620. Examination 
of water sources and losses; the 
evaporation and infiltration pro- 
cesses and their effects on stream 
flow hydrographs. Deterministic 
and stochastic methods of reser- 



Courses 123 

voir analysis and design for pur- 
poses of flood protection and 
water conservation will be in- 
vestigated, as well as problems in 
urban hydrology. 

CE 623 Open Channel 
Hydraulics 

Prerequisite: undergraduate course 
in hydraulics. Basic theories of 
open channel flow will be pre- 
sented and corresponding equa- 
tions developed. Methods of cal- 
culating uniform/steady flow; 
gradually varied flow; and rapid, 
spatially varied, unsteady flow 
will be investigated. Flow 
through bridge piers, transitions 
and culverts; backwater curves 
and the design of open channels. 

CE 624 Computer 
Applications in Hydrology/ 
Hydraulics 

Prerequisite: CE 620 and CE 623. 
Investigation of widely used com- 
puter software in the areas of hy- 
drology and hydraulics. The 
theory underlying the programs 
as well as application and evalua- 
tion of software will be stressed. 

CE 629 Wood Engineering I 

Prerequisites: a structural analy- 
sis course and a structural design 
course. Course may not be taken 
for credit by students who have 
completed the undergraduate 
equivalent of this course. Study of 
the growth and structure of wood 
and how these influence wood 
strength, durability, preservation 
and fire protection. Analysis and 
design of structural members of 
wood using Allowable Stress De- 
sign (ASD) method including 
beams, columns and connections; 
design of wood structures. Labo- 
ratory experiments included. 

CE 630 Reinforced Concrete 
Design 

Prerequisite: undergraduate course 
in concrete design and construc- 
tion. Advanced topics including 
deep beams, slabs, composite 
beams, beam columns, stability. 



124 



connections, creep and deflection 
control. 

CE 631 Structural Steel 
Design 

Prerequisite: undergraduate course 
in steel design and construction. 
Advanced topics related to the 
behavior and design of rigid 
frames (single and multistory), 
plate girders and connections. 

CE 633 Wood Engineering II 

Prerequisite: CE 629, or under- 
graduate course in wood engi- 
neering. Wood properties and de- 
termination of allowable stresses. 
Laminated, built-up and compos- 
ite sections. Wood framing sys- 
tems and connections to resist 
gravity and lateral loads. 

CE 634 Prestressed Concrete 
Design 

Prerequisite: undergraduate course 
in concrete design and construc- 
tion. Analysis and design of 
pretensioned and posttensioned 
concrete structures. Beams, col- 
umns, connections, partial pre- 
stressing, deflections, anchorage. 

CE 640 Structural Analysis 

Prerequisite: undergraduate course 
in indeterminate structures. 
Analysis of structures having 
members with variable cross sec- 
tions, secondary stresses, shear 
walls and semirigid connections. 
Influence lines for statically inde- 
terminate structures. 

CE 650 Soil Mechanics I 

Prerequisites: undergraduate course 
in soil mechanics; computer lit- 
eracy. The first course in a series 
of courses dealing with soil me- 
chanics and foundation engi- 
neering which will give the stu- 
dent a better understanding of the 
basic principles of geomechanics. 
Includes: the nature of soil; soil 
formation; phase relationships 
and classification; stress, strain 
and strength analysis; flow analy- 
sis; and consolidation theory. 



CE 651 Soil Mechanics II 

Prerequisite: CE 650. Second 
course in the soil mechanics se- 
ries. Includes: consolidation theo- 
ry, settlement analysis, soil modi- 
fication, compaction, lateral earth 
pressure, slope stability and soil 
exploration. 

CE 652 Foundation 
Engineering I 

Prerequisite: CE 651. The first of 
two courses in foundation engi- 
neering. Deals primarily with 
shallow foundations. Includes: 
types of foundations, site explo- 
ration, shear strength, bearing ca- 
pacity, limit states, settlement, al- 
lowable pressure, and rafts and 
mats. 

CE 653 Foundation 
Engineering II 

Prerequisite: CE 652. Second 
course in foundation engineering. 
Deals primarily with deep foun- 
dations. Topics include pile foun- 
dations, pile types, pile driving, 
load testing, design of individual 
piles, group action, drilled pier 
foundations, construction meth- 
ods and capacity in sand and clay. 

CE 660 Project Planning 

Application of network analogy 
to project planning and schedul- 
ing; resource, time and financial 
management. Computer applica- 
tions will be included. 

CE 661 Air Pollution 
Fundamentals 

An introduction to the sources of 
air pollution, transport of gaseous 
and particulate pollutants in the 
atmosphere on local and global 
scales, transformations of pollut- 
ants by atmospheric processes, 
impact of airborn pollutants on 
the environment, control of 
sources of air pollution and legis- 
lative mandates. Introduction to 
meteorological concepts and 
computer transport models. Cur- 
rent issues such as ozone deple- 
tion and global warming will also 
be discussed. (See also CM 621.) 



CE 670 Selected Topics 

A study of related topics of par- 
ticular interest to students and 
instructor. Course may be taken 
more than once. 

CE 678 Computer 
Applications in Civil 
Engineering 

Prerequisite: introductory course 
in computer fundamentals. The 
design and analysis of software 
and hardware systems for the so- 
lution of civil engineering prob- 
lems. Includes: software engi- 
neering, software coding, evalua- 
tion of hardware and software. 

CE 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 18 graduate hours or 
permission of the department 
chair and program coordinator. 
Independent study under the 
guidance of an adviser into an 
area of mutual interest, each 
study terminating in a technical 
report of academic merit. Re- 
search may be in such environ- 
mental areas as water resources, 
stream pollution, solid waste 
management or air pollution. 

CE 695 Independent Study I 

Prerequisite: permission of pro- 
gram coordinator. Independent 
study under the guidance of an 
adviser into an area designated 
by the program coordinator. 

CE 696 Independent 
Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

CE 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

CE 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Courses 125 



Chemistry 



CH 600 - Introduction to 
Environmental Chemistry 

Prerequisite: one year of general 
chemistry. Designed as a prereq- 
uisite for CH 601 for students 
with one year of undergraduate 
general chemistry, but who lack 
organic chemistry. Review of gen- 
eral and introduction to organic 
chemistry, with examples taken 
from topics of environmental con- 
cern including discussion of pol- 
lutants, toxicology and some en- 
vironmental analytic methods. 

CH 601 Environmental 
Chemistry 

Prerequisite: one year of general 
chemistry, plus one semester of 
organic chemistry or CH 600. Ar- 
eas of consideration: the sources, 
reactions, transport, effects and 
fates of chemical species in the 
water, soil and air environments, 
as well as the influence of human 
activities on these processes. 

CH 602 Environmental 
Chemical Analysis 

Prerequisite: CH 601 or equiv- 
alent. Theory and laboratory 
training in the applications of in- 
strumental methods in the analy- 
sis of environmental samples. 
Topics include sampling tech- 
niques; chromatography; ultra- 
violet-visible, infrared and atom- 
ic absorption spectroscopy; mass 
spectrometry; nuclear magnetic 
resonance spectrometry; bio- 
chemical methods and use of ra- 
dioisotopes. Laboratory fee re- 
quired. 

CH 611 Special Topics in 
Advanced Organic 
Chemistry 

Advanced course dealing with 
topics such as stereochemistry, 
photochemistry, natural products 
and mechanisms of organic 
reactions. 



CH 621 Chemical Forensic 
Analysis with Laboratory 

Advanced techniques and new 
developments in the identifica- 
tion of various materials such as 
pigments, dyestuffs, food addi- 
tives, pharmaceutical prepara- 
tions, polymers, synthetic fibers 
and inorganic material products. 
Laboratory fee required. 4 credits. 

CH 625 Chemistry of Fires 
and Explosions 

An examination of the basic or- 
ganic chemistry and combustion 
and explosive properties of flam- 
mable materials. The chemical 
principles underlying fires and 
explosions. Chemical properties 
of various synthetic materials and 
the products of their combustion. 
Fire retardant materials and 
chemicals used in fire extinguish- 
ment. (See also PS 625.) 

CH 631 Advances in 
Analytic Chemistry 

Provides background for the re- 
cent advances made in instru- 
mentation and current analytic 
techniques. 

CH 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

CH 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

CH 696 Independent 
Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

CH 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: completion of 15 
credits of graduate work. Periodic 
meetings and discussion of the in- 
dividual student's progress in the 
preparation of a thesis. 

CH 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Criminal Justice 

CJ 601 Seminar in 
Interpersonal Relations 

Interpersonal communication in 
teaching, supervision and in vari- 
ous work relationships. The 
criminal justice worker as a re- 
source person and facilitator of 
others is stressed. Humanistic 
psychology and interpersonal 
psychology provide the theoreti- 
cal base. 

CJ 605 Social Deviance 

A survey of theories relating to 
the scope and nature of the crime 
problem. Consideration of the 
problems of deviancy including 
social norms deviancy, mental 
disturbances, juvenile crime and 
the various possible and actual re- 
sponses to deviancy. Various ap- 
proaches to the problem of reha- 
bilitation. 

CJ 608 Law and Evidence 

Comprehensive study of the rules 
of evidence, particularly as ap- 
plied to physical evidence. In- 
cludes judicial notice, presump- 
tions, hearsay rules, confessions, 
admissions, scientific evidence 
and expert testimony. Emphasis 
on criminal law applications. 

CJ 610 Administration of 
Justice 

A study of all the steps of the 
criminal justice system from the 
time the accused is arrested until 
sentencing to a correctional facili- 
ty. The objective will be to review 
all the problems which arise dur- 
ing this process and to consider 
some possible solutions which 
will benefit the individual being 
processed without subverting the 
purposes of the process. 

CJ 612 Criminal Justice 
Management 

The development of the theory 
and practice of criminal justice 
management in the United States. 
Significant developments and 



126 



ideas of those who have made 
major contributions to American 
criminal justice management. 

CJ 614 Survey of Forensic 
Science 

An introductory survey of foren- 
sic sciences and criminalistics, 
crime scene procedures and docu- 
mentation, and methods of labo- 
ratory analysis for students spe- 
cializing in security and inves- 
tigation. 

CJ 616 Advanced Crime 
Scene Investigation 

An in-depth study of crime scene 
procedures including recogni- 
tion, protection, documentation, 
and collection of physical evi- 
dence; scene documentation, 
scene search procedures; and re- 
constructions from evidence and 
scene patterns. 

CJ 620 Advanced 
Criminalistics I 

The comparison and individu- 
alization of physical evidence by 
biological and chemical proper- 
ties is presented in lectures and 
carried out in the laboratory. The 
theories and practice of micro- 
scopic, biological, immunological 
and chemical analysis are applied 
to the examination of blood, sa- 
liva, seminal fluid, hair, tissues, 
botanical evidence and other ma- 
terial of forensic interest. 

CJ 621 Advanced 
Criminalistics I Laboratory 

Laboratory fee required. 1 credit. 

CJ 624 Group Process in 
Criminal Justice 

Small group interaction; both 
theoretical and experimental fac- 
ets of group process are pre- 
sented. Group counseling and en- 
counter groups. 

CJ 632 Advanced 
Investigation I 

An in-depth study of modern 
principles and techniques of 
criminal and civil investigations. 



Management of investigations, 
use of witnesses, interviewing, 
polygraph, backgrounds, estab- 
lishment of MO, missing persons, 
surveillance and investigation of 
questioned deaths and death 
scenes. 

CJ 633 Advanced 
Investigation II 

An in-depth study of the prin- 
ciples and techniques of criminal 
and civil investigations. Inves- 
tigation of fraud, embezzlement, 
white-collar crime, property 
crimes, sexual assaults and other 
crimes against persons; extortion; 
kidnapping; drug trades; and 
traffic accidents. 

CJ 637 Contemporary Issues 
in Criminal Justice 

Topics selected by students re- 
lating to current issues and con- 
cerns in the field of criminal jus- 
tice. Each student will be required 
to write a paper and deliver an 
oral presentation on a selected 
topic. 

CJ 640 Advanced 
Criminalistics II 

Introduction of advanced mi- 
croscopic, chemical and instru- 
mental methods with extensive 
"hands-on" experience provided 
by a laboratory section. Principles 
and methods of analysis of micro- 
scopic and macroscopic evidence 
such as glass, soil, papers, inks, 
dyes, paints, varnishes, explo- 
sives, fibers, drugs and other po- 
tential physical traces will be dis- 
cussed in class. 

CJ 641 Advanced 
Criminalistics II Laboratory 

Laboratory fee required. 1 credit. 

CJ 645 Drug Chemistry and 
Identification 

Introduction to licit and illicit 
drugs as evidence, followed by an 
overview of chemical, micro- 
scopical and instrumental tech- 
niques used for their identifica- 
tion; discussion of sampling. 



separation and quantitation of 
evidence specimens; presentation 
of drug chemistry expert testi- 
mony in courts of law. 

CJ 649 Fire Scene 
Investigation and Arson 
Analysis 

The techniques of crime scene 
documentation and investigation 
as they relate to fire and explosion 
scenes. Evidence recognition and 
collection. Laboratory analysis of 
fire scene, arson accelerant and 
explosion scene residues. Scien- 
tific proof of arson. Laboratory fee 
required. 4 credits. (See also FS 
649.) 

CJ 651 Criminal Procedure 

An inquiry into the nature and 
scope of the U.S. Constitution as 
it relates to criminal procedures. 
Areas covered include the law of 
search and seizure, arrests and 
the right to counsel. 

CJ 653 Physical Analysis in 
Forensic Science 

The classic firearms examination, 
classification and comparison of 
bullets and cartridges, toolmarks 
comparison and striation analy- 
sis, serial number restoration, 
document examination, voice- 
print identification, fingerprints 
and polygraphy examination. 

CJ 654 Physical Analysis in 
Forensic Science Laboratory 

Laboratory fee required. 1 credit. 

CJ 660 Forensic Microscopy 

Basic techniques of optical mi- 
croscopy and the development of 
operational skills for the use of 
the microscope as a tool of evi- 
dence detection and evaluation. 
Microscopical measurements and 
analytic methods will be covered. 
Laboratory fee required. 4 credits. 

CJ 661 Medicolegal 
Investigation and 
Identification 

An introduction to procedures 
and techniques for medicolegal 



investigation of questioned death 
and identification of deceased 
persons, including autopsy tech- 
nique, odontological procedures 
and anthropological approaches. 

CJ 662 Forensic Toxicology 

An in-depth analysis of forensic 
toxicological procedures and 
methods; determinations of me- 
tallic, volatile and soluble poi- 
sons; analysis for narcotic drugs 
and other drugs of abuse and dos- 
age form drugs that are com- 
monly abused or found contribut- 
ing to cause of death. Laboratory 
fee required. 4 credits. 

CJ 663 Advanced Forensic 
Serology I 

A comprehensive study of the 
theory and practice of isoenzyme, 
serum protein and immunoglob- 
ulin genetic markers in human 
blood and body fluids. Electro- 
phoretic and isoelectric focusing 
techniques. Interpretation of ge- 
netic marker results in blood indi- 
vidualization. Laboratory fee re- 
quired. 4 credits. 

CJ 664 Advanced Forensic 
Serology II 

A comprehensive study of the 
theory and practice of biochemi- 
cal and immunologic procedures 
for blood and body fluid identifi- 
cation; typing of Rh, MNSs and 
other red cell antigens in blood 
and blood stains; antiserum selec- 
tion and evaluation; ELISA tech- 
niques; DNA polymorphism 
analysis. Laboratory fee required. 
4 credits. 

CJ 667 Fire and Building 
Codes, Standards and 
Practices 

The study of building and fire 
codes and regulations as they re- 
late to the prevention and inci- 
dence of structural fires. Contem- 
porary building and fire codes 
and practices and their enforce- 
ment. Model building codes. Fire 
prevention and control through 
building design. (See also FS 667.) 



CJ 668 Fire and Casualty 
Insurance Practices 

A study of financial risk and de- 
cision making from the investiga- 
tive point of view. Insurance rate 
making and relation to risk and 
other factors. Insurance ad- 
justment and economic factors 
that must be considered in fire 
and accident investigations. (See 
also FS 668.) 

CJ 669 Dynamics, 
Evaluation and Prevention 
of Structural Fires 

A detailed analysis of the evo- 
lution of modern structures and 
the mechanical systems necessary 
to provide safety and comfort. 
The effect of the nature of struc- 
tures and their mechanical sys- 
tems on fire behavior. Structural 
bases and mechanical systems for 
fire protection and fire preven- 
tion. (See also FS 669.) 

CJ 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

CJ 673 Biomedical Methods 
in Forensic Science 

Methods and application of mod- 
ern toxicology, biochemistry, mo- 
lecular biology, pathology, den- 
tistry and medicine in forensic 
science. 

CJ 674 Biomedical Methods 
in Forensic Science 
Laboratory 

Laboratory fee required. 1 credit. 

CJ 675 Private Security Law 

A review and examination of cur- 
rently applicable federal and state 
administrative, civil, criminal and 
constitutional laws as they relate 
to the private security industry. 
The framework of the course will 
include sources of authority and 
common law. 



Courses 127 

CJ 676 Security 
Management Seminar 

Current problems, concerns, is- 
sues and legislation affecting the 
private security industry as they 
relate to and are of interest to the 
students and instructor. 

CJ 677 Private Security in 
Modern Society 

An introduction to current think- 
ing and problems relating to the 
private security industry. The 
course will examine such issues 
as historical growth, role, mission 
and future of the industry. Other 
topics will include professional- 
ization and ethics in the private 
security field. 

CJ 684 Fire/Accident Scene 
Reconstruction 

Application of principles of re- 
construction of the scene of a fire 
or accident, including proper pro- 
cedure for examining physical ev- 
idence to determine cause. Em- 
phasis on preparation of reports, 
testimony for hearings and trials, 
rendering of advisory opinions to 
assist in resolution of disputes af- 
fecting life and property. (See also 
FS 684.) 

CJ 686 Forensic Science 
Research Project I 

Individual guidance on a research 
endeavor. 1-3 credits. 

CJ 687 Forensic Science 
Research Project II 

Prerequisite: CJ 686. 1-3 credits. 

CJ 688 Forensic Science 
Internship I 

Formal educational development 
is complemented by field place- 
ment experience in a forensic sci- 
ence laboratory or identification 
unit. Field experience is su- 
pervised by designated agency 
and department personnel. Stu- 
dents must complete a project in 
connection with the internship 
placement and experience; an ap- 
propriate work product must be 
provided to the instructor. 



128 



CJ 689 Forensic Science 
Internship II 

Prerequisite: CJ 688. 

CJ 690 Research Project I 

Individual guidance on a research 
endeavor. 1-3 credits. 

CJ 691 Research Project II 

Prerequisite: CJ 690. 1-3 credits. 

CJ 693 Criminal Justice 
Internship I 

The student's formal educational 
development will be com- 
plemented by field placement ex- 
perience in various criminal jus- 
tice settings or agencies. Field ex- 
perience will be supervised by 
designated agency and depart- 
ment personnel. 

CJ 694 Criminal Justice 
Internship II 
Prerequisite: CJ 693. 

CJ 695 Independent Study 

A directed independent learning 
experience, the topic and format 
to be agreed upon by the student 
and supervising faculty. 1-3 cred- 
its. 

CJ 697 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's 
progress toward the completion 
of the thesis. 

CJ 698 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 

CJ 699 Thesis III 

A continuation of Thesis II. 



Chemical 
Engineering 

CM 621 Air Pollution 
Fundamentals 

Prerequisite: CH 601 or permis- 
sion of instructor. An introduchon 
to the sources of air pollution, 
transport of gaseous and particu- 
late pollutants in the atmosphere 



on local and global scales, trans- 
formations of pollutants by atmo- 
spheric processes, impact of 
airborn pollutants on the environ- 
ment, control of sources of air 
pollution and legislative man- 
dates. Introduction to meteoro- 
logical concepts and computer 
transport models. Current issues 
such as ozone depletion and glo- 
bal warming will also be dis- 
cussed. (See also CE 661.) 

CM 622 Air Pollution 
Control 

Prerequisite: CM 621 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Covers conven- 
tional and emerging air pollution 
control technologies. Conven- 
tional technologies include cy- 
clone separators, baghouse filters, 
wet scrubbers, electrostatic pre- 
cipitators, thermal and catalytic 
incineration, absorbers and ad- 
sorption systems. Emerging tech- 
nologies will vary with new de- 
velopments. Legislative man- 
dates related to control technolo- 
gies and emission limits will be 
discussed. 

CM 624 Chemical Process 
Safety 

Prerequisite: undergraduate de- 
gree in engineering, chemistry or 
physics, or permission of instruc- 
tor. Methods of analysis and de- 
sign for the control of hazards as 
applied to a chemical process en- 
vironment. Emphasis on applica- 
tions and current industrial prac- 
tices. Topics include: character- 
ization of chemical hazards, toxic 
release modeling, fires and explo- 
sion prevention, pressure relief 
equipment design, hazard identi- 
fication/risk assessment tech- 
niques and accident investiga- 
tion. 

CM 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
the instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 



CM 690 Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or 
permission of the department 
chair and program coordinator. 
Independent work under the 
guidance of an adviser into an 
area of mutual interest, each 
study terminating in a technical 
report of academic merit. May 
involve research or design activ- 
ity to solve a significant technical 
problem which utilizes chemical 
engineering concepts. 

CM 695 Independent 
Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

CM 696 Independent 
Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

CM 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: completion of 15 
credits of graduate work. Peri- 
odic meetings and discussion of 
the individual student's progress 
in the preparation of a thesis. 

CM 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Communication 

CO 621 Managerial 
Communication 

Major emphasis on the role of 
communication in a democracy 
and the effects of communication 
content. Brief treatment of con- 
tent analysis techniques, person- 
to-person communication and 
barriers to the flow of communi- 
cation. 

CO 623 Communication in 
Health Care 

Examination of the diversity of 
communication encounters and 
contexts in which allied health 



Courses 129 



professionals may be involved; 
emphasis on development of 
competencies and skills necessary 
to communicate effectively with 
staff, patients and the community. 
Influence of interpersonal com- 
munications and mass media in 
staff development, patient care 
and the marketing of health care. 
Students will develop a commu- 
nication campaign aimed at inter- 
nal and external audiences. 

CO 631 Public Information 
Dynamics 

How the executive can best 
present the organization in an ac- 
curate and favorable light to the 
news media. Training techniques 
for the public relations person 
who will work with executives 
giving corporate messages inter- 
nally and press statements exter- 
nally. 

CO 632 Contemporary 
Public Relations Issues 

Using the case-study approach, 
concentrates on the problems 
facing management and public 
relations executives in busi- 
nesses and other institutions. 
The problems change from year 
to year, in tune with develop- 
ments in society. 

CO 640 Communications 
Technologies 

An in-depth examination for non- 
technical students of technologies 
used with visual, voice data and 
character information for com- 
municating at a distance, for stor- 
ing and subsequently retrieving 
information, and for processing 
information to improve com- 
munication efficiency. 

CO 641 Competition and 
Regulation in 
Telecommunications 

A study of proceedings before 
state public utility commissions 
and the Federal Communications 
Commission delineating the 
boundaries between those activi- 
ties in the telecommunications 



field subject to regulation, those 
open to competition with restric- 
tions and those cleared to be fully 
competitive. The course will in- 
clude discussion and analysis of 
contemporary legal proceedings 
affecting this topic. 

CO 642 Management of 

Telecommunications 

Organizations 

A study and comparison of mana- 
gerial systems and practices in 
users, manufacturers, distribu- 
tors and common carriers of tele- 
communications facilities. Identi- 
fication of criteria necessary for 
developing and maintaining ef- 
fective telecommunications or- 
ganizations. Case problems will 
relate largely to specific instances 
from this field. 

CO 643 Telecommunications 
Policy and Strategy 

Examination of management 
policies and strategies for the 
complex telecommunications or- 
ganization operating in a dy- 
namic environment, from the 
viewpoint of the top-level execu- 
tives of the organization. Devel- 
opment of analytic frameworks 
for the management of numerous 
elements involved in assuring the 
fulfillment of the goals of the to- 
tal organization. Integration of 
the student's general business 
knowledge with the content of 
the course. Emphasis is placed on 
the examination and discussion 
of cases drawn largely from the 
telecommunication industry. 

CO 670 Selected Topics 

Prerequisite: permission of ad- 
viser. An in-depth examination of 
a topic in the field of communica- 
tion which reflects the special re- 
search of a faculty member or the 
special interest of a group of stu- 
dents. May be taken more than 
once. 

CO 693 Internship 

A program of field experience, 
approved by the program ad- 



viser, under the tutelage of a 
professional in the field of com- 
munication. 

CO 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study or research in communi- 
cation under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

CO 696 Independent 
Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

CO 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings with the ad- 
viser for discussion of the indi- 
vidual student's progress in the 
preparation of a thesis. 

CO 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Computer Science 

CS 602 Computing 
Fundamentals 

An introduction to computers, 
computing and computer science, 
including consideration of basic 
concepts and technology, devel- 
opment of automatic computa- 
tion, computer applications, orga- 
nization of hardware and soft- 
ware systems, algorithms, flow- 
charts, elementary programming, 
number systems, survey of pro- 
gramming languages. This course 
may not be taken for credit by stu- 
dents having nine or more credits 
in computer science. 

CS 603 Introduction to 
Programming/Pascal 

A first course in programming 
and problem solving methods, 
using the Pascal language. It will 
cover all major aspects of that lan- 
guage. Several common algo- 
rithms will be taught as part of 
the process of learning the lan- 
guage. Students will be expected 
to design, code and run several 
Pascal programs. 



130 



CS 605 Introduction to Pro- 
gramming/COBOL 

Prerequisite: CS 603 or CS 610. An 
intermediate-level programming 
course introducing and develop- 
ing the business-oriented pro- 
gramming language COBOL. It 
will cover most major aspects of 
the language including syntax, 
arithmetic, verbs, decision mak- 
ing, perform, data manipulation 
and validation, control breaks, 
table processing, sorting, subpro- 
grams, design and debugging of 
programs. The student will de- 
sign, code, and run several CO- 
BOL programs. 

CS 606 Technical 
Programming/FORTRAN 

Prerequisite: CS 603 or CS 610. A 
course in scientific programming 
using the FORTRAN 90 language 
and covering most of its features. 
Numerical techniques studied 
include root finding, numerical 
integration, matrix operations, 
statistical techniques and list han- 
dling. 

CS 610 Intermediate 
Programming/C 

Prerequisite: CS 603 or permis- 
sion of instructor. An intermedi- 
ate-level programming course 
covering all aspects of ANSI C 
language, its preprocessor, syntax 
and semantics, modern usage, 
design and solution techniques, 
as well as elements of data struc- 
tures, algorithms, and analysis of 
programs. Emphasis is on con- 
struction of portable, modular 
programs. 

CS 616 Assembly Language 

Prerequisites: CS 603 or CS 610; 
CS 640. Introduction to assembly 
language programming, including 
study of instruction types and op- 
eration, assembly language syntax 
and features, explicit use of 
memory, macros, subprograms, in- 
terrupts, I/O conversions. Major 
functional characteristics of the 
computer and its peripherals will 
be studied. 



CS 619 Legal Protection of 
Computer Software 

Prerequisite: CS 602 or equiva- 
lent. The legal principles involved 
in the protection of proprietary 
computer software and hardware 
by means of patents, copyrights 
and trade secrets. Software licens- 
ing and employer-employee rela- 
tionships involving creative 
work. (See also PS 619.) 

CS 620 Data Structures 

Prerequisite: CS 603, or CS 610 
and ability to read Pascal. An ex- 
amination of data structures, their 
function and uses. Topics will in- 
clude basic data representations, 
arrays, linked structures, stacks, 
queues, trees, graphs, hashing. 
Study of relation between data 
structures and algorithms, with 
sorting and searching, elements 
of complexity analysis. Recursion 
and other solution techniques. 
Students use their choice of Pas- 
cal or C to develop and run sev- 
eral programs. 

CS 620B File Structures 

Prerequisites: CS 610, CS 620, CS 
640. An in-depth exposure to the 
design, selection, implementation 
and use of computer file struc- 
tures employed in the external 
storage of data; also, related is- 
sues in concurrency control, re- 
covery and query processing. 

CS 621 Applied Algorithms 

Prerequisites: CS 610, CS 620. Im- 
portant algorithms usually omit- 
ted in earlier courses. Topics to be 
selected at the instructor's discre- 
tion from, but not limited to, the 
following: measuring perfor- 
mance of algorithms; external 
(polyphase) sorting; string 
searching (Boyer-Moore); partial 
match retrieval; range searching; 
quad- and oct-trees; fast Fourier 
transform; generating random 
permutations; merging, splitting 
and finding the k-th member of 
ordered lists; data encryption; 
and data compression. 



CS 622 Database Systems 

Prerequisites: CS 603 or CS 610. A 
survey of database systems, their 
purpose, structure, function and 
use. Topics will include an over- 
view of DB systems, major DB 
models, design and implementa- 
tion methods in DB models, intro- 
duction to typical DB systems and 
internal operation of DB systems. 

CS 622B Advanced Database 
Systems 

Prerequisites: CS 620, CS 622, CS 
644. A second course in database 
systems covering advanced top- 
ics, fourth-generation languages 
and new developments in the da- 
tabase field. Topics include: data- 
base design methodologies and 
evaluation, concurrency control, 
recovery schemes, security, query 
processing, fourth-generation 
languages, decision support sys- 
tems and new developments. 

CS 624 Software 
Engineering 

Prerequisites: CS 610, CS 620. For 
the experienced computing stu- 
dent involved with software sys- 
tem management, design and 
programming. Includes: analysis 
of complexity, efficiency and im- 
provement of code, strategies for 
large programming projects, sys- 
tematic design methods, testing 
and debugging the human-ma- 
chine interface. 

CS 626 Object-Oriented 
Principles and Practice/C++ 

Prerequisites: CS 610, CS 620. In- 
depth exposure to object-ori- 
ented analysis, design and pro- 
gramming. Effects of this new 
technology on the traditional 
software life cycle. Programming 
projects in an object-oriented lan- 
guage such as C++ or Turbo Pas- 
cal. 

CS 628 Object-Oriented 
Design 

Prerequisite: CS 626. An object- 
oriented design methodology 
course, taught in the C++ Ian- 



Courses 131 



guage. Topics include system 
analysis, design and implementa- 
tion. Primary emphasis on the 
Object Modeling Technique 
(OMT) methodology and its im- 
portance in developing a software 
project. Students will design a 
major group project and imple- 
ment portions using C+-I-. 

CS 630 Introduction to 
Computing Theory 

Introduction to the theory of com- 
puters and computation in- 
cluding study of formal systems 
and methods; regular expres- 
sions, formal languages and 
grammars, elements of parsing 
theory, and the Chomsky hierar- 
chy; finite automata and push- 
down automata; decidability; 
Turing machines. Post machines 
and other formal computer mod- 
els; and elements of complexity 
theory. 

CS 631 Intermediate 
Computing Theory 

Prerequisites: CS 603 or CS 610; 
CS 630. Second course in the 
theory of computers and compu- 
tation; increasing depth and de- 
tail, with introduction of more 
advanced topics on formal lan- 
guage theory, models of computa- 
tion, and analytic methods in- 
cluding context-free grammars 
and languages, parsing, pumping 
lemma for CFGs, context-sensi- 
tive languages, language hierar- 
chy, Turing and other models, 
decidability, compuational limits, 
complexity analysis. 

CS 632 Algorithm Design 
and Analysis 

Prerequisite: CS 620. Study of the 
theory of algorithms, emphasiz- 
ing their nature, structure, capa- 
bilities and limitations. Consider- 
ation of general strategies of de- 
sign and analysis of algorithms, 
including structured methods, 
correctness and complexity. Spe- 
cific algorithmic strategies, such 
as combinatorial exhaustion, 
backtracing and branch-and- 



bound. Recursive function theory. 
Application of abstract models of 
computing to algorithms, includ- 
ing such topics as Turing ma- 
chines, P- and NP-Completeness. 

CS 636 Structure of 
Programming Languages 

Prerequisites: CS 610, CS 620, CS 
630 with knowledge of at least 
two high-level computer lan- 
guages. The structure, syntax and 
semantic aspects of computer lan- 
guages will be studied. Programs 
will be written in the FORTH lan- 
guage. 

CS 638 Compiler Design 

Prerequisites: CS 610, CS 620, CS 
630. Study of the function, struc- 
ture and design of language 
translators, including assemblers, 
macroprocessors, compilers and 
interpreters. Topics include lexi- 
cal and syntax analysis, symbol 
tables, memory management, 
relocation, linking, loading, error 
handling, fundamentals of code 
optimization and generation. 

CS 640 Computer 
Organization 

The structure and the function of 
computers. The nature and the 
characteristics of modern com- 
puter systems and the operation 
of individual components: CPU, 
control unit, memory units and 
I/O devices. Topics include ad- 
dressing methods, machine-pro- 
gram sequencing, microprogram- 
ming, complex I/O organization, 
interrupt systems, multiple-mod- 
ule memory systems and caches, 
peripheral devices and micropro- 
cessors. 

CS 640B Parallel Computer 
Architectures 

Prerequisites: CS 610, CS 640. Par- 
allel and other high-performance 
architectures and their implica- 
tions for system software, includ- 
ing three structural classes: 
pipelined computers, array pro- 
cessors and multiprocessor sys- 
tems. Topics include the memory 



and the I/O subsystems needed 
in parallel computers, the design 
principles and applications of 
pipelined super-computers, the 
interconnection structure of array 
processors, operating system con- 
trols, coordination of parallel ac- 
tivity and performance of evalu- 
ation parallel systems. 

CS 642 Computer Networks 
and Data Communication 

Prerequisites: CS 610, CS 640, 
IE 607. The ISO 7-level model, 
network topology, communica- 
tions theory, protocols, virtual cir- 
cuits and packet switching, local 
networks (CSMA, token ring, 
Ethernet), security (DES, public- 
key crypto-systems), concurren- 
cy, distributed software. 

CS 644 Operating Systems 

Prerequisites: CS 620 as a pre- or 
corequisite, and CS 640. Study of 
the function, structure and design 
of computer operating systems, 
principally multiprogramming 
systems. Topics include manage- 
ment of processes and processor 
resources, of data and memory 
and of peripheral devices; concur- 
rent processes; system protection; 
scheduling; paging and virtual 
systems. 

CS 644B Advanced 
Operating Systems 

Prerequisite: CS 644. A second 
course in operating systems and 
system architecture covering ad- 
vanced topics, and new hard- 
ware/software developments. In- 
cludes: interprocess communica- 
tion, design issues, special-pur- 
pose and multiprocessor operat- 
ing systems, concurrency and ac- 
cess control, user interfaces, I/O 
devices and management, paral- 
lel architecture, fault tolerance 
and new developments. 

CS 646 Data Parallel 
Programming 

Prerequisites: CS 610, CS 620, CS 
644. The programming tech- 
niques and algorithms used to 



132 



program massively parallel com- 
puters containing possibly thou- 
sands of processors. Topics: hard- 
ware structures for parallel com- 
puting, detecting vector paral- 
lelism in sequential programs, 
measuring the efficiency of paral- 
lel algorithms, algorithms that 
benefit from data parallelism, 
converting algorithms to benefit 
from data parallelism, program- 
ming with implicit parallelism 
and explicit parallelism. 

CS 647 Systems 
Programming/C 

Prerequisites: CS 610, CS 620, CS 
640; CS 644 recommended. Tech- 
niques for systems programming 
in the C language. Topics include 
data structures for system imple- 
mentation, data compaction algo- 
rithms, macro preprocessors, con- 
ditional compilation, low-level 
interface programming, UNIX 
system calls including file opera- 
tions and process control, client- 
server routines. 

CS 648 Computer Systems 
Analysis and Selection 

Prerequisite: CS 620. Study of per- 
formance evaluation and se- 
lection of computer hardware and 
software systems. Consideration 
of requirements determination, 
computer structure and capabil- 
ity, performance testing tech- 
niques, decision and planning 
methods. 

CS 650 Computer Graphics 

Prerequisites: CS 610, CS 620, M 
610 or equivalent. The math- 
ematical foundations for com- 
puter graphics and introduction 
to the current state of the art of 
graphics programming. Includes: 
2-D and 3-D viewing, geometric 
transformations, clipping, seg- 
mentation, user interaction, 
curves, surfaces, modeling and 
object hierarchy. 

CS 650B Advanced 
Computer Graphics 

Prerequisite: CS 650. A second 



course in computer graphics cov- 
ering advanced concepts such as 
perspective depth, hidden-sur- 
face elimination, surface fitting 
and surface displaying, light, 
color, shading, fractals, and geo- 
metric models and object hierar- 
chy. 

CS 660 Artificial 
Intelligence/Scheme 

Prerequisites: CS 610, CS 620. 
Principal techniques of the func- 
tional programming language 
Scheme, and the fundamental 
goals and methods of artificial 
intelligence (or AI)-a field which 
attempts to simulate intelligent 
behavior by computer. Includes 
the design and implementation of 
AI programs using Scheme. 

CS 662 Expert Systems 

Prerequisites: CS 610, CS 620. 
Principles of expert systems, arti- 
ficial intelligence programs that 
embody knowledge of some area 
of human expertise and that can 
interact with an unskilled user to 
provide a cost-effective expert 
consultant. Examines application 
of expert systems in practice and 
how to create such systems. Stu- 
dents will design and implement 
expert systems. 

CS 664 Neural Networks 

Prerequisites: CS 610, CS 620. Ex- 
amines various connection to- 
pologies between the many, 
simple parallel processing ele- 
ments of neural networks; the 
learning algorithms which train 
the networks; and the computa- 
tional capabilities of these various 
configurations. Independent liter- 
ature research, class presentations 
and software simulations of neur- 
al networks required. 

CS 665 Digital Image 
Processing 

Prerequisite: CS 610, CS 620, M 
610 or equivalent. Theoretical and 
mathematical basis of techniques 
of digital image processing and 
programming methodologies 



necessary to implement such 
techniques. Introduction to cur- 
rent capabilities of digital image 
acquisition hardware. Implemen- 
tation of standard procedures for 
image enhancement, morphol- 
ogy, compression and storage. 
Image transforms and informa- 
tion extraction techniques in both 
the spatial and Fourier frequency 
domains. 

CS 666 Image Recognition 

Prerequisites: CS 610, CS 620, M 
610 or equivalent; CS 665 recom- 
mended. Focus on the identifica- 
tion and localization of objects in 
images seen by a digital camera. 
Topics include 2-D and 3-D imag- 
ing techniques, low-level image 
processing, methods of modeling 
objects on a computer, extraction 
of distinctive features from im- 
ages, developing correspondence 
between image and model fea- 
tures, object classification, object 
pose determination relative to the 
camera. 

CS 670 Selected Topics 

Prerequisite: CS 620 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. An exami- 
nation of new developments or 
current practices in computer and 
information science. A topic will 
be selected for thorough study. 
Possible subject areas include 
data structures, recent hardware 
or software advances and special- 
ized applications. Content may 
vary from trimester to trimester. 

CS 690 Project 

Prerequisite: 15 credit hours and 
permission of the program coor- 
dinator. Completion of a sig- 
nificant project under the guid- 
ance of an adviser in an area of 
mutual interest, such study termi- 
nating in a technical report of aca- 
demic merit. For example, the 
project may be a survey of a tech- 
nical area in computer science or 
may involve the solution of an ac- 
tual or hypothetical technical 
problem. 



CS 695 Independent Study I 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
program coordinator. Indepen- 
dent study under the guidance of 
an adviser in an area designated 
by the program coordinator in 
consultation with the student. 

CS 696 Independent 
Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

CS 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussion 
of the individual student's pro- 
gress in the preparation of a the- 
sis. 

CS 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



English 



E 600 English Language 
Workshop 

Enrollment in this course is lim- 
ited to and required of students 
who are not native speakers of 
English and who lack adequate 
background in English instruc- 
tion. Students whose TOEFL 
scores are less than 560 and/or 
students who enter the Graduate 
School following completion of 
an intensive English language 
program are required to take and 
pass this training course in the 
first term of enrollment at the 
Graduate School. The course em- 
phasizes development of conver- 
sation, pronunciation and compo- 
sition skills and includes orienta- 
tion to the Peterson Library and 
instruction in writing a research 
paper. No credit. 

E 659 Writing and Speaking 
for Professionals 

A practical, tool-oriented ap- 
proach for professionals who 
need to perfect writing and 
speaking skills for career ad- 
vancement or presentations in 
graduate courses. Students gener- 



ate work-related writing/speak- 
ing assignments and negotiate 
learning contracts based on edit- 
ing, writing and speaking meth- 
ods related to individual needs 
and objectives. (See also HU 659.) 



Economics 

EC 601 Macroeconomics and 
Microeconomics 

A basic theoretical foundation for 
students who lack adequate back- 
ground in economics. An in- 
troduction to and review of basic 
economic principles. 

EC 603 Microeconomic 
Analysis 

Prerequisites: EC 601, QA 604 or 
permission of instructor. Survey 
of the behavior and decision 
choices of individual economic 
agents (e.g., consumers, firms and 
resource owners) under alterna- 
tive market conditions, time hori- 
zons and uncertainty. 

EC 604 Macroeconomic 
Analysis 

Prerequisites: EC 601, QA 604 or 
permission of instructor. Study of 
the performance and fluctuations 
of the economy, focusing on eco- 
nomic policies that affect perfor- 
mance. Topics include consump- 
tion and investment, the determi- 
nants of changes in wages and 
prices, monetary and fiscal poli- 
cies, money, interest rates, the fed- 
eral budget, the national debt, 
and interdependence and policy 
between countries. 

EC 608 Economics for Public 
Administrators 

Overview of social and institu- 
tional issues pertaining to the 
public sector using economics as 
the analytic frame of reference. 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 

Survey of problems, strategies 
and policies of management 
interactions with formal and in- 
formal labor organizations. Labor 



Courses 133 

legislation, collective bargaining, 
productivity analysis and arbitra- 
tion are stressed, with emphasis 
on negotiating strategies and 
techniques. 

EC 627 Economics of Labor 
Relations 

Survey of labor economics using 
the tools of economic and institu- 
tional analysis. Emphasis on hu- 
man resources and demographics 
pertaining to labor markets. 

EC 629 Business and Society 

Prerequisite: EC 601. Topics in- 
clude forces shaping business in- 
stitutions through emerging so- 
cial, legal, ethical and political is- 
sues such as pollution control, 
workplace issues, equal employ- 
ment opportunity, product safety 
and relations with external stake- 
holders. Also addressed, using 
lectures and cases, will be laws 
and regulations that govern and 
restrict business activities. 

EC 633 Managerial 
Economics 

Prerequisites: EC 601, PI 601. Ap- 
plication of the major tools of eco- 
nomic analysis to problems en- 
countered by management pre- 
sented using lectures and case 
studies. Topics include measure- 
ment of market demand, cost 
analysis, expenditure and pro- 
duction decisions, price determi- 
nation in competitive markets 
which include the entrepreneurial 
enterprise as well as the allocation 
of capital and investment. 

EC 641 International 
Economics 

Prerequisite: EC 604. Examination 
of international trade, foreign ex- 
change and capital markets. Top- 
ics include national policy in an 
open economy, international 
policy coordination and global- 
ization. 

EC 645 Seminar in 
Macroeconomic Policy 

Prerequisite: EC 604. Fiscal, mon- 



134 



etary and incomes policies and 
their impact on employment, 
growth and prices. Advanced 
topics not covered in EC 604. 

EC 653 Econometrics 

Prerequisites: EC 603, EC 604, QA 
604 or permission of instructor. 
Analysis of many of the statistical 
techniques used in econometrics; 
may include linear regression 
models, choice estimators, esti- 
mation and hypothesis testing, 
and forecasting techniques. 

EC 655 Economic Problems 
of Developing Countries 

Prerequisites: EC 604 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Study of mod- 
ernization and economic growth 
within developing countries with 
emphasis on an expanded capital 
base. 

EC 665 Urban and Regional 
Economic Development 

Prerequisite: EC 601 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Techniques, 
methods of analysis and models 
utilized in the development pro- 
cess. Emphasis on job creation, 
manufacturing assistance, free 
enterprise zones and regional 
planning. 

EC 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

EC 687 Collective 
Bargaining 

Prerequisite: EC 625 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Emphasis on 
contract negotiation, whether in a 
formal or informal bargaining 
scenario. Contract development 
covers wages, benefits, job secu- 
rity, management's rights, equal 
opportunity and grievance proce- 
dures. Additional time devoted to 
third-party settlements — the arbi- 
tration process. 

EC 690 Research Project 

Prerequisites: permission of the 
instructor; for students enrolled 



in the master of science program 
in industrial relations, the 
prerequisite is all required core 
courses in the M.S. in industrial 
relations program or permission 
of program coordinator. A major 
independent research study/ 
project carried out under faculty 
supervision, with focus on an in- 
tegrative approach and/or re- 
search issues in the field. 

EC 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

EC 696 Independent 
Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

EC 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

EC 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 

EC 703 Forecasting and 
Econometrics 

Enrollment limited to doctoral 
students only. See page ??? for 
course description. 

EC 704 Public and Private 
Policy Interfaces 

Enrollment limited to doctoral 
students only. See page ??? for 
course description. 



Education 

Some course numbers in this field 
are followed by the suffixes "A" 
for administration, "E" for el- 
ementary, "K" for early childhood, 
"M" for middle grades/middle 
school and "S" for secondary. 

ED 600 Student Teaching 

This practicum satisfies the re- 
quirement of the State of Con- 



necticut for teacher candidates to 
demonstrate attainment of the ap- 
propriate Connecticut Teaching 
Competencies in a culminating 
clinical activity of supervised stu- 
dent teaching. 6 credits. 

ED 601 Introduction to 
Education and Field Study 

This course is for nonintern, evening 
students. Initial training and ob- 
servational opportunities for 
part-time and nonintern students 
to facilitate awareness of the pro- 
fessional community and its mis- 
sion. Students will devote 100 
hours to field study as part of the 
course. 2 credits. 

ED 603 E/K/M/S Human 
Growth and Development 

A study of the major aspects of 
human development from con- 
ception through adolescence, pre- 
senting the important theories 
and research methods of the field 
and tracing the physical, cogni- 
tive psychological and social de- 
velopment of each chronological 
division. 2 credits. 

ED 604 The Learning 
Process 

Content emphasizes the applica- 
tion of psychological principles 
and research results to the teach- 
ing-learning process. Includes 
learning principles, development, 
planning instruction, evaluating 
student performance, classroom 
management and motivation. 2 
credits. 

ED 605 Students with 
Special Needs 

Provides prospective educators 
with an understanding of meth- 
ods used to identify, diagnose and 
teach exceptional students in 
regular and special classrooms. 
Describes the developmental and 
learning characteristics of excep- 
tional students, reviews educa- 
tional and supportive services, 
and examines laws impacting on 
the education of students with 
special needs. 



Courses 135 



ED 606 History of American 
Education 

Survey of the relationship be- 
tween education and American 
culture through a focused study 
of the history of public schooling 
in the United States. Study of 
events, developments and moods 
that have shaped American edu- 
cation through Colonial times, the 
first century of American inde- 
pendence, the Progressive reform 
era and the Depression era to the 
current day. 2 credits. 

ED 607 Survey of United 
States History 

Broad-based review of American 
history from Colonialism to the 
present. This course is designed 
specifically for preservice teach- 
ers in order to meet Connecticut 
state certification requirements. 

ED 611 Learning and 
Intelligence 

Examination of the dynamics of 
the major explanations of learn- 
ing and intelligence; learning as 
the core of behavior. 

ED 612 Curriculum Design 

Application of theoretical knowl- 
edge of curriculum to real course 
planning. Investigation and 
analysis of current educational 
programs in terms of curricular 
theory as well as training for 
teachers in basic curriculum de- 
velopment techniques. 

ED 613 International 
Education 

A study of selected modern edu- 
cational systems, their basic 
philosophical commitments and 
the effects of such educational 
systems on the society itself. 
Comparison of a variety of 
international education systems 
with the current system in the 
United States. 

ED 614 Philosophy of 
Education 

A critical analysis of education in 
contemporary society as reflected 



in the thinking of modern and 
early philosophers. (See also PL 
614.) 

ED 615A/B/C/D/E Strategies 
in Mathematics Content 

Provides specialized training in 
teaching specific content areas of 
mathematics to current and fu- 
ture teachers. 1 credit for each 
content area. 
ED 615A Geometry I 
ED 615B Geometry II 
ED 615C Graphing Calculators 
ED 615D Discrete Methods 
ED 615E Remedial Mathematics 

ED 616 A/B/C/D/E Strategies 
in Science Content 

Provides specialized training in 
teaching specific content areas of 
science to current and future 
teachers. 1 credit for each content 
area. 

ED 616A Chemistry 
ED 616B Physics 
ED 616C Earth Science 
ED 61 6D Biology 
ED 616E Integrating Mathematics 
and Science 

ED 617 A/B/C/D/E Strategies 
in Social Science Content 

Provides specialized training in 
teaching specific content areas of 
the social sciences to current and 
future teachers. 1 credit for each 
content area. 

ED 617A Constitutional Law 
ED 617B Political Science 
ED 617C Governance 
ED 617D Local History and His- 
torical Methods 
ED 61 7E Geography 

ED 618 A/B/C/D/E Strategies 
in Business Content 

Provides specialized training in 
teaching specific content areas of 
business to current and future 
teachers. 1 credit for each area. 
ED 618A Computer Technology 
ED 618B Software Applications 
ED 618C International Business 
ED 618D Economics 
ED 618E Marketing and Adver- 
tising 



ED 619 A/B/C/D/E Strategies 
in English Language 

Provides specialized training in 

teaching specific content areas of 

the English language to current 

and future teachers. 1 credit for 

each content area. 

ED 619A Humanities 

ED 619B Research Writing 

ED 619C Journalism 

ED 61 9D Poetry 

ED 619E Drama 

ED 620 Seminar in 
Multicultural Issues 

A series of lectures, dialogues and 
discussions to promote un- 
derstanding of the diverse ethnic, 
cultural and economic groups 
composing American society as 
they interact in the schools. 1-3 
credits. 

ED 621E/M/S Teaching 
Strategies in Mathematics 

Introduction to current concepts 
and trends in the field of math- 
ematics instruction with par- 
ticular focus on new materials, 
methods and teaching strategies 
that will assist prospective teach- 
ers as they plan, present and eval- 
uate mathematics education. 2 
credits. 

ED 622E/M/S Teaching 
Strategies in Science 

Introduction to current concepts 
and instructional techniques in 
the field of science teaching; fo- 
cuses on providing teachers with 
the skills, knowledge and meth- 
odologies for teaching science. 2 
credits. 

ED 623E/M/S Teaching 
Strategies in Social Studies 

Introduction to current concepts 
and trends in the field of social 
studies instruction with par- 
ticular focus on new materials, 
methods and teaching strategies 
that will assist prospective teach- 
ers as they plan, present and eval- 
uate social studies education. 2 
credits. 



136 



ED 624 Teaching Strategies 
in Business 

Focus is on the strategies for 
teaching business concepts and 
practices to preuniversity stu- 
dents. 2 credits. 

ED 625E/K/M/S Teaching 
Strategies in Language Arts 

Introduction to the materials and 
methodologies used to develop 
the reading, writing, listening and 
speaking skills of students. As 
language arts is a critical part of 
the teacher's responsibilities, this 
course emphasizes the broad 
range of instructional practices 
and materials currently available 
and the latest improvements in 
practice based on new theories 
and research in the language arts 
field. 2 credits. 

ED 626 E/K/M/S Reading 
Strategies in Elementary/ 
Early Childhood/Middle/ 
Secondary School 

Introduction to current concepts 
and trends in reading instruction 
for different levels of students. 
Training in selection and use of 
materials and methodologies that 
will lead to appropriate and suc- 
cessful classroom reading instruc- 
tion, improvement of perfor- 
mance and student achievement. 
2 credits. 

ED 627 Writing in the 
Content Areas 

Designed for teachers in the 
middle school and high school 
content areas. Focuses on training 
teachers to implement a variety of 
instructional methods related to 
developing writing skills across 
disciplines. 1 credit. 

ED 628 Reading Diagnosis 
and Remediation 

Examines both traditional and 
innovative means of assessing 
reading strengths and needs as 
well as corrective instruction. 
Fundamental principles of diag- 
nosis and instruction in reading 
are presented, providing a philo- 



sophical basis for working with 
all reading students, whether in 
regular classrooms, special edu- 
cation, remedial reading classes 
or reading clinics. The course is 
designed for Reading Specialist 
Certification. 

ED 630 E/K/M/S Literature 
for Children and 
Adolescents 

Provides knowledge of children's 
and young adult's publications; 
introduces students to the wealth 
of literature available for young 
readers and its potential for en- 
hancing classroom instruction. 
Selection of interesting and well- 
written materials based on 
knowledge of human develop- 
ment to motivate, expand and di- 
versify instruction. 2 credits. 

ED 632 Content Updates 

Focuses on the knowledge bases 
required for teaching in the spe- 
cific content areas and major dis- 
ciplines (1-3 credits; may be taken 
more than once, limited to six 
credits in any one content area.) 

ED 633D/E/F Micro and 
Macro Curriculum 
Management I, II, III 

Prerequisite: ED 612. This three- 
section course introduces tech- 
niques for developing plans of 
curriculum design at both the 
classroom and district level. 
Strategies for implementing and 
monitoring the articulation of 
curricular plans across grade lev- 
els and content areas are covered. 
May also serve as a unifying 
mechanism for interdisciplinary 
studies. Each course section is 1 
credit. 

ED 635 History of Science 

This course introduces students 
to the history of science from the 
Scientific Revolution to the 
present. It will deal with the de- 
velopment of new ideas and the 
contexts in which they are con- 
structed. It will assist students to 
understand how people devel- 



oped ideas to interpret nature and 
why they changed those ideas. 

ED 642 E/K/M/S Current 
Instructional Trends 

Course designed to update class- 
room teachers' knowledge of in- 
structional methodologies in par- 
ticular content areas. Topics vary 
depending on the content area 
and major disciplines (2 credits; 
may be taken more than once; 
limited to six credits in any one 
content area). 

ED 650 The Classroom 
Environment 

An investigation of the interre- 
lationship between the physical 
environment of the classroom 
and student behavior. 

ED 651 Ethical and Legal 
Issues 

Investigation and analysis of the 
major ethical and legal issues sur- 
rounding the field of education in 
contemporary America. 

ED 652 Supervision: Issues 
and Procedures 

An analysis of research-based 
methods of clinical supervision 
designs to help teachers observe, 
analyze and interpret classroom 
instruction. Using a case-study 
method, teachers will learn tech- 
niques of clinical supervision as 
well as discuss issues related to 
educational leadership and edu- 
cational reform. Clinical supervi- 
sion and its importance to effec- 
tive teaching; techniques for ob- 
servation of classroom instruc- 
tion and conferencing based on 
objective data. Discussion of is- 
sues related to teacher account- 
ability, teacher empowerment, 
school reform and the profes- 
sional development of the class- 
room teacher within the frame- 
work of supervision methodol- 
ogy- 

ED 653 Principles of School 
Administration 

An introduction to administrative 



Courses 137 



theory, process and current prac- 
tices. Students will confront ma- 
jor issues and management func- 
tions which are typified in con- 
temporary American schools and 
examine the essence of leader- 
ship. 

ED 654 E/K/M/S 
Organization and Structure 
in the Schools 

Study of the structural arrange- 
ments and organizational prac- 
tices in the classroom and in the 
school unit at the different levels 
of education: early childhood, el- 
ementary, middle school and sec- 
ondary. 

ED 670/671 Selected Topics 

Study of selected and timely is- 
sues of particular interest to the 
student. 

ED 680 Contemporary 
Issues 

Seminar course on current issues 
surrounding American education 
and the differing viewpoints ex- 
pressed. While the exact content 
is expected to vary from year to 
year, in accordance with the var- 
ied interests of educators and the 
general public, the basic theme is 
the exposition of the fundamental 
and present concerns in educa- 
tion. 

ED 682 A/E/K/M/S 
Measurement, Assessment 
and Evaluation 

Trains teachers and other edu- 
cators to construct reliable and 
valid measurements for a variety 
of pedagogical situations, to iden- 
tify major standardized testing in- 
struments, to use test results effi- 
ciently and effectively, and to de- 
sign a variety of assessment strat- 
egies appropriate to students, 
staff and functions. 

ED 683 Computer 
Applications 

Provides or enhances a working 
knowledge of educational com- 
puting in order to evaluate educa- 



tional software and create new in- 
structional materials for the class- 
room. Relates students' knowl- 
edge of pedagogy and curriculum 
to the creative use of instructional 
technology. 1-3 credits. 

ED 685 Research in the 
Schools 

An in-depth analysis of research 
on teaching practices, including 
the study of quantitative and 
qualitative research techniques. 
Students are required to conduct 
mini research projects and to de- 
sign a research proposal for a final 
project. 

ED 686 Intern Orientation 
and Training 

Intensive full-day, pre-service 
training sessions with periodic 
follow-up sessions providing in- 
terns with a broad overview of 
school programs, policies, regula- 
tions and basic instructional skills 
to sustain a successful teaching 
experience during internship 
placement. Topics include con- 
ducting classroom activities, 
preparahon to be skilled observers 
of classroom and school activity, 
and information required for cer- 
tification. 2 credits. 

ED 687 Field Project I 

An individualized project related 
to the classroom, to the curricu- 
lum or to school methodology. 1- 
3 credits. 

ED 688 Field Project II 

An individualized project related 
to the classroom, to the curricu- 
lum or to school methodology. 1- 
3 credits. 

ED 689 Research Design 

The study of research techniques 
leading to the design of a class- 
room-based or school-based re- 
search project. Helps students to 
understand published research 
and its applicability to public 
schools and the classroom. 2 cred- 
its. 



ED 690 Research Project 

Independent study under the su- 
pervision of an adviser for com- 
pletion of a significant school- 
based project designed in ED 689 
which satisfies the requirement of 
a final project for obtaining the 
graduate degree. 1-3 credits. 

ED 691 Capstone Project 

Prerequisite: 24 credits of gradu- 
ate study. An alternative option 
for completing the final project 
requirement for the graduate de- 
gree; focuses on implementing 
designs directly applicable to 
school practices, procedures and 
policies. 1-3 credits. 

ED 692 Internship I 

Practicum intended to provide 
paraprofessional services in a co- 
operative arrangement with 
school districts while the interns 
are learning to work effectively in 
those schools by working as in- 
structors, substitute teachers, tu- 
tors, leaders of small-group in- 
struction, monitors of mathemat- 
ics and reading groups, team 
members in curriculum study 
projects, researchers, assistants in 
the resource centers and comput- 
er labs, classroom aides and in 
other capacities as required by the 
principals in particular place- 
ments. Specific internship re- 
quirements are available from the 
program coordinator. This is the 
first trimester of a full-year school 
experience. 2 credits. 

ED 692R Internship I-2nd 
Year 

Continuation of internship in the 
first trimester of a second year of 
placement. 2 credits: will not be 
counted toward credits required 
for the master's degree. 

ED 693 Internship II 

Continuation of ED 692 for the 
interns' second trimester. 2 cred- 
its. 



138 



ED 693R Internship II-2nd 
Year 

Continuation of internship in the 
second trimester of a second year 
of placement. 2 credits; will not be 
counted toward credits required 
for the master's degree 

ED 694 Internship III 

Continuation of ED 692 and ED 
693 for the interns' third trimester. 
2 credits. 

ED 694R Internship III-2nd 
Year 

Continuation of internship in the 
third trimester of a second year of 
placement. 2 credits; will not be 
counted toward credits required 
for the master's degree. 

ED 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 1-3 credits. 

ED 696 Independent 
Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 1-3 credits. 

ED 697D/E/F Residency I, II, 
III 

A clinically supervised and coop- 
eratively guided practicum in a 
classroom or administrative set- 
ting which is designed to provide 
professional development activi- 
ties, experience in management 
positions, demonstration of lead- 
ership qualities and achievement 
of institutional goals. It is de- 
signed as an advanced form of 
fieldwork for experienced educa- 
tors. Each course is 2 credits. 

ED 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

ED 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Electrical and 

Computer 

Engineering 



EE 603 Discrete and 
Continuous Systems I 

Prerequisite: computer pro- 
gramming competence. Continu- 
ous and discrete linear systems, 
system function. Z transforms, 
Fourier transforms, periodic 
functions, discrete Fourier series, 
fast Fourier transforms, Hilbert 
transforms. Digital processing of 
analog signals, sampling theo- 
rems. 

EE 604 Discrete and 
Continuous Systems II 

Prerequisite: EE 603. Review of 
linear vector spaces, bases, Hil- 
bert spaces. Introduction to the 
similarity transformation, diag- 
onalization of the A matrix, prop- 
erties of similarity transforma- 
tions, Jordan forms, quadratic 
forms, matrix norms, functions of 
A matrix, Caley-Hamilton theo- 
rem, pseudoinverse. Mathemati- 
cal modeling of physical systems, 
state space representation of dy- 
namical systems, computer-ori- 
ented mathematical models. State 
space and linear systems, mean- 
ing of state, methods of obtaining 
state equations. Stability of physi- 
cal systems and linear systems, 
linearization and stability in the 
small, equivalent linearization 
and the describing function, sta- 
bility in the large and the second 
method of Liapunov, exact fre- 
quency domain stability crite- 
ria — Popov's method and its ex- 
tension. 

EE 605 Computer Controlled 
Systems 

Prerequisites: EE 604 and EE 650. 
Disturbance models, design, ana- 
log design, state space design 
methods, pole placement design 
based on input-output models, 
optimal design methods (state 
space approach), optimal design 



methods (input-output ap- 
proach), identification, adaptive 
control, implementation of digital 
controllers, reduction of the ef- 
fects of disturbances, stochastic 
models of disturbances, continu- 
ous time stochastic differential 
equation. 

EE 606 Robot Control 

Prerequisite: EE 605. Orientation 
coordinate transformations, con- 
figuration coordinate transfor- 
mations, Denavit-Hartenberg co- 
ordinate transformations, D-H 
matrix composition, inverse con- 
figuration kinematics, motion ki- 
nematics, force and torque rela- 
tionships, force and moment 
translation, trajectories, coordinat- 
ed motion, inverse dynamics, po- 
sition control, feedback systems, 
performance measures, PID con- 
trol, inverse dynamic feedforward 
control, nonlinear control. 

EE 615 Introduction to 
Computer Logic 

Prerequisite: any one of CS 603 
through CS 610 (or equivalent). 
Introduction to logic elements 
and to their application in digital 
networks for processing numeri- 
cal data. The course deals with 
analysis and design techniques of 
combinational and sequential 
networks and includes a discus- 
sion of logic variables, switching 
functions, optimal realizations, 
multivariable systems. Design 
examples will include logic cir- 
cuits for addition, multiplication, 
counting, parity generation and 
detection. 

EE 620 Fuzzy Logic and 
Control 

Prerequisites: basic linear algebra, 
probability, systems theory. Intro- 
duction to fuzzy logic and fuzzy 
control systems. Basic fuzzy logic 
concepts will be covered, fol- 
lowed by a selection of fuzzy ap- 
plications from the literature. 
Topics include fuzzy sets, fuzzy 
numbers, fuzzy relations, fuzzy 
logic and appropriate reasoning. 



Courses 139 



fuzzy rule-based systems, fuzzy 
control, fuzzy classification, 
fuzzy pattern recognition. Home- 
work will consist of computer 
exercises and simulations; a final 
project is required. 

EE 630 Electronic 
Instrumentation I 

Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. Design of modern elec- 
tronic instrumentation. Circuit 
and system examples, evaluation 
and design techniques. Emphasis 
on practical applications includ- 
ing design theory and the circuit 
techniques used in linear 
integrated devices. Variety of 
electronic instrumentation in- 
cluding computer interfaces, sig- 
nal conditioners, waveform gen- 
erators and shapers, filters, V/F, 
A/D, D/A converters and other 
special-purpose circuits. 

EE 631 Electronic 
Instrumentation II 

Prerequisite: EE 630. 

EE 634 Digital Signal 
Processing I 

Prerequisite: EE 603. A study of 
the theories of digital signal pro- 
cessing and their applications. 
Topics include discrete time sig- 
nals, the Z transform, the discrete 
Fourier transform, the EFT, ho- 
momorphic signal processing and 
applications of digital signal pro- 
cessing. 

EE 635 Digital Signal 
Processing II 

Prerequisite: EE 634. 

EE 637 Power Systems 
Engineering I 

Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. Concepts and methods 
of analysis and design of modern 
power systems. Includes the net- 
work representation of power 
systems, matrix methods, sym- 
metrical components and the use 
of the computer in the solution of 
problems such as short circuit 
fault calculations, load flow 



study, economic load dispatching 
and stability Other topics may 
include protection, relaying or 
transmission system design. 

EE 638 Power Systems 
Engineering II 

Prerequisite: EE 637. 

EE 639 Electric Power 
Distribution 

Prerequisite: EE 637 or equiva- 
lent. Structure of electric power 
distribution, distribution trans- 
formers, subtransmission lines, 
substations, bus schemes, pri- 
mary and secondary systems, ra- 
dial and loop feeder designs, volt- 
age drop and regulation, capaci- 
tors, power factor correction and 
voltage regulation, protection, 
buses, automatic reclosures and 
coordination. 

EE 645 Introduction to 
Communication Systems 

The analysis and design of com- 
munication systems. Includes 
analog and digital signals, sam- 
pling, quantization, signal repre- 
sentation. Analog and digital 
modulation, pulse code modula- 
tion, delta modulation, time and 
frequency multiplexing. Noise in 
communication systems. 

EE 646 Digital 
Communications I 

Prerequisite: EE 645. Formatting 
and baseband transmission, 
bandpass modulation and de- 
modulation, communication link 
analysis, channel coding synchro- 
nization. 

EE 647 Digital 
Communications II 

Prerequisite: EE 646. Multiplex- 
ing and multiple access, spread 
spectrum techniques, source cod- 
ing and encoding, encryption and 
decryption. 

EE 650 Random Signal 
Analysis 

A study of the theory of random 
signals and processes. Includes 



correlations, spectra, stationarity, 
ergodicity and systems with ran- 
dom inputs. Hubert's transforms, 
shot noise, thermal noise, Markoff 
processes, mean square estima- 
tion, spectral estimation and en- 
tropy. 

EE 652 Design of Digital 
Filters 

Techniques in the analysis and 
design of digital filters. Digital fil- 
ter terminology and frequency re- 
sponses. FIR filter design. IIR digi- 
tal filter design including Butter- 
worth and Chebyshev lowpass, 
highpass, bandpass and bandstop 
filters. The DFT and IDFT; EFT al- 
gorithms. 

EE 658 Microprocessors — 
Theory and Applications 

Prerequisite: CS 616 or equiva- 
lent. A study of the techniques 
and methods of designing digital 
systems using a microprocessor 
as the basic unit. Microcomputer 
assembly language, operating 
systems, input/output devices, 
programmable read-only memo- 
ries and interfacing. 

EE 670 Selected Topics 

Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. A study of selected top- 
ics of particular interest to stu- 
dents and instructor. Course may 
be taken more than once. 

EE 680 Fiber Optic 
Communications 

The fundamentals of lightwave 
technology, optical fibers, LEDs 
and lasers, signal degradation in 
optical fibers, photodetectors, 
power launching and coupling, 
connectors and splicing tech- 
niques, transmission link analy- 
sis. Includes selected laboratory 
experiments. 

EE 681 Lightwave 
Technology 

Prerequisite: EE 680. Advanced 
topics in lightwave technology. 
Optical fiber waveguides, trans- 
mission characteristics of optical 



140 



fibers, ray theory and electro- 
magnetic mode theories are con- 
sidered. Forms of communication 
systems and distribution net- 
works. Optical sources, detectors 
and receivers are discussed in 
conjunction with modulation for- 
mats and system design. 

EE 682 Computer 
Architecture 

Review of design of large sys- 
tems, mathematical-based discus- 
sion of algorithms for arithmetic 
operation in the computer, de- 
scription language, design of 
ALU, design of control unit, mi- 
croprogramming, memory orga- 
nization, system organization. 

EE 685 Optimization of 
Engineering Systems 

Prerequisite: EE 604. The calculus 
of variations, functionals, linear- 
ity of functionals, closeness of 
functions, the increment of a func- 
tional, maxima and minima of 
functionals, the fundamental 
theorem of the calculus of varia- 
tions, the variational problem, 
Euler-Lagrange equations, bound- 
ary conditions, the transversality 
conditions, piece-wise-smooth 
extremals, the first and second car- 
rier conditions, Lagrange mul- 
tiples, the Hamiltonian canonical 
equations, the control problem, 
the problems of Lagrange and 
Mayer, Strong's variation, 
Legendre conditions, Weierstrass 
excess function, Pontryagin's 
minimal principle. 

EE 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
and written permission of pro- 
gram coordinator. Independent 
study under the guidance of a fac- 
ulty adviser, such study terminat- 
ing in a technical report of acade- 
mic merit. Research may consti- 
tute a survey of a technical area in 
electrical engineering, or may in- 
volve the solution of an actual or 
hypothetical technical problem. 



EE 695 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. A planned program of 
individual study or research un- 
der supervision of a faculty mem- 
ber. 

EE 697 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: completion of 15 
credits of graduate work; student 
must have submitted a thesis pro- 
posal and performed a literature 
search in the preceding trimester. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

EE 698 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis L 

EE 699 Thesis III 

A continuation of Thesis IL 



Environmental 
Science 

EN 600 Environmental 
Geoscience 

Study of the systems of hydro- 
sphere and lithosphere important 
in the understanding of the 
causes of and solutions to envi- 
ronmental problems, including 
natural hazards as well as energy, 
mineral and water resources. 
Course covers material from geol- 
ogy and engineering geology, 
geophysics, geomorphology and 
hydrology. 

EN 601 Principles of 
Ecology 

Presentation of current topics in 
the various fields of ecology in- 
cluding community, population 
and ecosystem ecology. Particular 
emphasis on those areas related to 
environmental management. 
Some weekend field trips, or ac- 
ceptable alternative, required. 

EN 602 Environmental 
Effects of Pollutants 

Prerequisites: EN 600, EN 601 and 



undergraduate organic chemistry 
or graduate introduction to envi- 
ronmental chemistry. A survey of 
the demonstrated and suspected 
effects of air, water and other pol- 
lutants on natural systems and on 
human welfare. Methods of study- 
ing and assessing effects are also 
presented. 

EN 603 Terrestrial and 
Wetland Ecology 

Prerequisites: EN 600, EN 601. 
Study of terrestrial and wetland 
environments and ecological pro- 
cesses. Characterization, de- 
scription and mapping of habi- 
tats. Use of topographic maps, 
aerial photographs. National 
Wetland Inventory maps and 
simple survey techniques in 
environmental investigations. 
Some weekend field trips, or ac- 
ceptable alternative, required. 

EN 604 Ecology of Inland 
Waters 

Prerequisites: EN 600, EN 601. 
Advanced study of ecological 
processes of inland waters, both 
lotic and lentic. Some weekend 
field trips, or acceptable alterna- 
tive, required. 

EN 605 Marine and 
Estuarine Ecology 

Prerequisites: EN 600, EN 601. 
Advanced study of ecological 
processes of estuaries and marine 
habitats. Some weekend field 
trips, or acceptable alternative, re- 
quired. 

EN 606 Environmental Data 
Analysis 

Prerequisites: 15 graduate hours 
and a previous course in statistics, 
or permission of instructor. The 
application of analytic techniques 
to environmental data in the areas 
of applied ecology, envi- 
ronmental geology and chemis- 
try. These include: applied 
univariate and multivariate sta- 
tistics as well as geostatistical 
methods. Introduction to micro- 



Courses 141 



computer software available for 
environmental analyses. 

EN 607 Environmental 
Reports and Impact 
Assessment 

Prerequisites: 21 graduate hours 
including EN 600, EN 601 and CE 
606. A study of the EIS/EIA pro- 
cess including the regulatory 
framework, how to prepare envi- 
ronmental reports and impact as- 
sessments, formats required for 
EIS and other common reports, 
data collection and presentation, 
planning and carrying out assess- 
ments, and text preparation. 
Some field work may be required. 

EN 608 Landscape Ecology 

Prerequisites: EN 600, EN 601. In- 
depth study of the characteristics 
and dynamics of terrestrial and 
aquatic ecosystems on a regional 
scale. Spatial relationships be- 
tween ecosystems are examined 
with regard to natural ecologic 
and geologic functions and alter- 
ations due to human activities. 
Applications to land-use plan- 
ning, resource management, con- 
servation and other environmen- 
tal concerns are addressed via 
class projects. 

EN 610 Environmental 
Health 

Prerequisite: EN 601 or under- 
graduate biology major. Prin- 
ciples of public health with gen- 
eral emphasis given to environ- 
mental factors such as air and 
water pollutants, legal standards 
and preventive measures and 
their relationships to public 
health. 

EN 612 Epidemiology 

An introduction to the principles 
and methods of epidemiology. 
Concepts of disease, analysis of 
morbidity and mortality as well 
as observational and experimen- 
tal techniques considered. Illus- 
trative examples concentrate on 
environmental issues. 



EN 613 Radioactivity and 
Radiation in the 
Environment 

Prerequisites: EN 600 and CH 
601, or permission of instructor. 
Basic principles of nuclear struc- 
ture and radioactivity; the inter- 
action of radiation with matter 
and biological effects of radiation; 
natural and man-made sources of 
radiation in the environment. The 
second half of the course will fo- 
cus on long-term environmental 
effects of radiation accidents (e.g., 
Chernobyl and others) and the 
problems of nuclear waste dis- 
posal, plutonium inventories 
from nuclear weapons, natural 
radon in buildings and similar 
concerns. (See also PH 613.) 

EN 615 Toxicology 

Prerequisite: introductory chem- 
istry. Introduction to envi- 
ronmental and industrial toxicolo- 
gy; toxicologic evaluation; the 
mode of entry, absorption and 
distribution of toxicants; the me- 
tabolism and excretion of toxic 
substances; interactions between 
substances in toxicology; toxico- 
logic data extrapolation; particu- 
lates; solvents and metals; agri- 
cultural chemicals — insecticides 
and pesticides; toxicology of plas- 
tics; gases; food additives; plant 
and animal toxins; carcinogens, 
mutagens and teratogens. (See 
also SH 615.) 

EN 616 Human Health and 
Environmental Risk 
Assessment 

Prerequisites: EN 601, CE 606 and 
EN 615. Introduction to applica- 
tion of human health and envi- 
ronmental risk assessment by en- 
vironmental agencies. Principles 
of environmental risk assessment, 
legislative mandates for risk as- 
sessment, guidance documents, 
case studies, analysis and assess- 
ment procedures. Emerging de- 
velopments in the field reviewed 
through class projects. 



EN 617 Subsurface 
Assessment 

Prerequisites: EN 600, CH 601 
and CE 606. Introduction to con- 
ducting subsurface contamina- 
Hon assessments. Includes related 
environmental regulations and li- 
abilities, site hydrogeology, 
chemical characterization of con- 
taminants, field methodologies, 
risk assessments and site con- 
tamination remediation. Some 
fieldwork required. 

EN 618 Hazardous Materials 
Management 

Prerequisites: CE 606 and under- 
graduate organic chemistry or 
graduate introduction to environ- 
mental chemistry. The multi- 
disciplinary facets of managing 
hazardous materials and wastes. 
Integrates specialized knowledge 
from the fields of environmental 
biology, chemistry, engineering, 
hydrogeology and public health 
in the techniques used to main- 
tain compliance with environ- 
mental standards. Includes regu- 
latory framework, practical exer- 
cises and concepts of sound prac- 
tices of hazardous waste man- 
agement. 

EN 620 Advanced 
Environmental Geology 

Prerequisite: EN 600, or under- 
graduate course in geology, or 
permission of instructor. Qualita- 
tive and quantitative examination 
of the application of geology to 
environmental problems includ- 
ing natural hazards and their 
remediation, site selection for 
various types of land uses, geol- 
ogy of waste disposal sites and 
natural resource evaluation. A 
class project for a local govern- 
ment or environmental agency 
will demonstrate practical appli- 
cation of these principles and ex- 
amine the process of project plan- 
ning and management, genera- 
tion and use of geologic data, re- 
port preparation and presenta- 
tion. Laboratories and some 



142 



weekend fieldwork required. 
4 credits. 

EN 621 Hydrology 

Prerequisite: undergraduate course 
in physics, geology, hydraulics or 
limnology; or permission of in- 
structor. Lectures cover basic hy- 
drologic theory including nature 
and chemical behavior of water, 
precipitation and evapotrans- 
piration, interception, surface 
water, groundwater supply and 
treatment, and water law. Other 
topics may include irrigation, 
flood control, karst hydrology 
and water chemistry. Required 
laboratories cover field measure- 
ment, sampling and problem- 
solving techniques. Some week- 
end fieldwork required. 4 credits. 

EN 622 Groundwater 
Geology 

Prerequisite: EN 600, or EN 621, 
or CE 620, or permission of in- 
structor. Physical and chemical 
behavior of water occurring in 
rock and soil (groundwater). Cov- 
ers the geologic environments in 
which groundwater exists, 
groundwater movement and 
chemistry, use of groundwater as 
a water supply, groundwater field 
investigations and testing, conta- 
minant transport in groundwater, 
and the nature and use of ground- 
water flow and contaminant mod- 
els. Laboratories will include prac- 
tical experience in field techniques 
(drilling, geophysical, well, log- 
ging, etc.), modeling and data 
analysis. 4 credits. 

EN 625 Geomorphology 
Prerequisite: EN 600, or a pre- 
vious college-level course in 
physical geology or geography, or 
permission of instructor. Study of 
landforms and the processes that 
produce them including the oper- 
ation of erosional and deposition- 
al processes in a variety of geolog- 
ic settings (fluvial, coastal, glacial, 
periglacial, karst and arid). Also 
covers the relationship of land- 
forms and processes to the solu- 



tion of environmental problems. 
Lectures cover processes; re- 
quired laboratories focus on land- 
form recognition and geomorphic 
process interpretation using maps 
and aerial photographs. Two re- 
quired field trips (one 2-day and 
one 2 1 /2-day) with shared trans- 
portation and costs. 4 credits. 

EN 626 Glacial Geology 

Prerequisite: EN 600 or EN 625, or 
a previous college-level course in 
physical geology or geography, or 
permission of instructor. Glacial 
processes, landforms, materials 
and history. Relationships be- 
tween various glacial landforms 
(identifiable on topographic 
maps) and the materials that com- 
prise them. Two required field 
trips in New England (one 1-day 
and one 2 1/2-day) with shared 
transportation and costs. 

EN 627 Soil Science 

Prerequisite: EN 600, or a pre- 
vious college-level course in 
physical geology or geography, or 
permission of instructor. Proper- 
ties, occurrence and management 
of soil as a natural resource. Cov- 
ers the chemistry, physics, 
morphology and mineralogy of 
soils, and their genesis and classi- 
fication. Soil properties will be 
related to their role in environ- 
mental problem solving and deci- 
sion making. 

EN 632 Field Geology of the 
Northeast 

Prerequisite: EN 600, or a pre- 
vious college-level course in geol- 
ogy, or permission of instructor. 
Intensive training in geological 
field observation and interpreta- 
tion in a variety of geologic set- 
tings. Weekly class meetings 
cover field techniques and locali- 
ties. Five required field trips 
(three 1-day, one 2 1/2-day, one 4 
1/2-day) will focus on site geol- 
ogy, geomorphology and envi- 
ronmental problems as well as 
field observation and interpreta- 
tion. Transportation and costs 



will be shared. 4 credits. 

EN 633 Selected Topics in 
Field Geology 

Prerequisite(s): EN 600, or un- 
dergraduate course in geology; 
other prerequisite(s) depend on 
specific course topic. Selected 
field studies and trips of special 
interest. Credit varies depending 
on length of trip or investigation. 
May be taken more than once. 1- 
4 credits. 

EN 640 Introduction to 
Geographical Information 
Systems 

Survey of GIS technology, re- 
search and applications in natural 
resource management, environ- 
mental assessment, urban plan- 
ning, business, marketing and 
real estate, law enforcement, pub- 
lic administration and emergency 
preparedness. Includes critical 
evaluation, case studies and com- 
puter demonstrations. 

EN 641 Geographical 
Information System 
Techniques and 
Applications I 

Prerequisites: working knowl- 
edge of PC-based computing and 
consent of instructor/program 
coordinator. First of a two-course 
sequence on GIS technology and 
applications. Laboratory exer- 
cises using both raster- and 
vector-based GIS systems. Hard- 
ware and software components of 
GIS; data acquisition, input and 
manipulation; cartographic out- 
put; report generation. 

EN 642 Geographical 
Information System 
Techniques and 
Applications II 

Prerequisite: EN 641 or consent 
of instructor. Second of a two- 
course sequence on GIS technol- 
ogy and applications. Laboratory 
exercises using both raster- and 
vector-based GIS systems. Ad- 
vanced GIS techniques; spatial 
analysis and modeling for a vari- 



Courses 143 



ety of applications (e.g., environ- 
mental science, business, plan- 
ning); development of GIS sys- 
tems. 

EN 643 Application of GIS 
in Environmental Science 

Prerequisite: EN 642 or consent of 
instructor. Application of ad- 
vanced GIS techniques to envi- 
ronmental assessment and man- 
agement constructed around a 
real world project from a govern- 
ment agency or nonprofit organi- 
zation. Students will collaborate 
to design and implement the 
complete GIS application. Defini- 
tion of project goals, special 
project needs and steps necessary 
for successful completion. 

EN 650 Environmental 
Microbiology 

Prerequisite: undergraduate biol- 
ogy major, or a course in biology 
and a course in organic chemistry. 
Interaction of microorganisms 
(principally bacteria and fungi) 
and their environments, stressing 
transformations they may accom- 
plish depending on physical and 
chemical circumstances. Practical 
application of microbes in sewage 
and other soil/wastewater 
cleanup, biodeterioration, pest 
control and production of useful 
products. Laboratory microcosm 
projects required. 4 credits. 

EN 651 Bioremediation 
Science 

Prerequisite: EN 650 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Study of the use 
of microorganisms to decontami- 
nate/remediate soil, groundwa- 
ter and air emissions containing 
various organic compounds. In- 
cludes survey of applicable mi- 
crobial activities and growth pa- 
rameters, classes of organic com- 
pounds that can be degraded/ 
modified and application of latest 
bioremediation technologies for 
cleanup. Laboratory involves re- 
view of site/hydrogeological 
plans for efficacy of bio- 
remediation, visitation of avail- 



able bioremediation sites 
(biopiles,bioventing,biosparging, 
etc.) and group projects involving 
a site(s) currently undergoing 
bioremediation. 4 credits. 

EN 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

EN 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
instructor. Independent study 
under the supervision of an ad- 
viser. 

EN 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

EN 696 Independent 
Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

EN 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

EN 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Executive M.B.A. 

The Executive M.B.A. program 
consists of the following 20 mod- 
ules, each four sessions in length. 

EXID 903 The 
Communication Process 

Analysis of communication and 
the functions of management 
with emphasis on perception, 
persuasion, conflict and change. 

EXID 906 The Management 
Process 

The role of executives and man- 
agers in administrative and op- 
erational processes. Includes or- 
ganizational goals and structure. 



planning and performance con- 
trols and resource management. 

EXID 909 Business and 
Government Relations 

An analysis of the impact of the 
major regulatory agencies of the 
federal government upon busi- 
ness. Specific attention given to 
the legal and economic impacts of 
the agencies; their independence 
of action vis-a-vis Congress, the 
judiciary and each other. 

EXID 912 Financial 
Accounting 

An understanding of information 
in financial reports and how man- 
agers use this information in de- 
cision making. Includes financial 
accounting standards, methods of 
financial statement analysis and 
current developments in financial 
reporting. 

EXID 915 Quantitative 
Decision Making 

Probability and financial analysis 
techniques within the framework 
of the randomness encountered 
in the real world. Includes practi- 
cal applications of expected val- 
ues, value of information, 
Markov systems, game theory 
and decision theory. 

EXID 918 Managerial 
Economics 

Application of economic analysis 
to business forecasting, planning 
and policy formulation. Includes 
cost-benefit analysis, cost es- 
timation and break-even analysis. 

EXID 921 Executive 
Leadership Seminar 

Examination of a variety of meth- 
ods of executive development to 
be accomplished through di- 
rected self-evaluation, role-play- 
ing and observation of successful 
executives through on-site visits 
or lectures by contemporary exec- 
utives. 



144 



EXID 924 Financial 
Management I 

Analysis of financial decision 
models for investment, financing 
and dividend decisions of the 
profit-oriented firm. Includes 
capital budgeting, capital struc- 
tures and the cost of capital and 
dividend policy. 

EXID 927 Financial 
Management II 

Analysis of financial decision 
models for the management of 
working capital. The manage- 
ment of current assets and the re- 
lated financing mixture. 

EXID 930 Marketing 
Practice 

The new marketing concept and 
its application in the modern cor- 
poration. Organizational aspects 
and environmental determinants 
of marketing decisions are exam- 
ined, culminating in a discussion 
of buyer behavior characteristics. 
Practical considerations in using 
the elements of the marketing 
mix: product, price, channel and 
promotion policy. 

EXID 933 Managing the 
Global Marketplace 

An examination of the theory and 
practice of a national or inter- 
national company trading in 
world markets, focusing on 
strategic planning for this envi- 
ronment from economic, political, 
social, regulatory and competi- 
tive points of view. 

EXID 939 Operations 
Management 

Analysis of management science 
techniques from the executive 
perspective. Focus on under- 
standing the value of such tech- 
niques as inventory and systems 
modeling, queueing, linear pro- 
gramming and simulation with 
an emphasis on their roles in deci- 
sion making. 



EXID 942 Managerial 
Accounting 

An understanding of the uses of 
accounting data by managers in 
directing the affairs of organi- 
zations. Includes cost systems, 
profit planning, standard and rel- 
evant costs and world-class man- 
ufacturing concepts. 

EXID 945 Human Resources 
Management 

Effective management of the ag- 
gregate human resource in the 
modern organization. Analysis of 
personnel policies and proce- 
dures, manpower planning, and 
employee training and policies. 

EXID 948 Labor and 
Management Relations 

An examination of the evolution 
of the labor movement in the 
United States and the role that the 
federal government has played in 
the shaping of the labor laws per- 
tinent to the collective bargaining 
system. 

EXID 951 Marketing 
Management 

Strategic considerations and op- 
tions in managing a firm's mar- 
keting function. Scope and meth- 
ods of marketing research as well 
as issues involved in new product 
management. The importance, 
opportunities and constraints of 
international marketing. The 
unique aspects of service market- 
ing. 

EXID 954 Organizational 
Development 

Various methods for effective or- 
ganizational development in con- 
temporary environments. Analy- 
sis of means to improve existing 
organizations in consideration of 
past history and changing value 
structures. 

EXID 957 Corporate Policy 
and Strategy 

Examination of the major man- 
agement issues facing the chief 
executive with emphasis on re- 



source allocation questions. In- 
cludes the strategy development 
process, supporting organization 
structure and reward system. 
Serves as an integrating mecha- 
nism for several preceding 
courses. 

EXID 960 Information 
Management 

Analysis of technologies, costs 
and challenges of integrating 
computers into the modern busi- 
ness environment. 

EXID 999 Special Research 
Topics 

A seminar in which the culmi- 
nation of student research will be 
presented and critiqued, and in 
which state-of-the-art topics may 
be examined by nonfaculty guest 
lecturers. 



Finance 

FI 601 Finance 

Prerequisites: A 621, EC 601 and 
QA 604. An examination of the 
valuation, investment and financ- 
ing of the firm and its business 
activities. Includes: valuation of 
investment under uncertainty 
and its implications on invest- 
ment strategy; the cost of capital 
and capital structure and its im- 
plications on financing strategy; 
leasing; dividend policy; funda- 
mental risk management con- 
cepts and implications; and (if 
time is available) mergers, acqui- 
sitions, divestiture, the market for 
corporate control and the hedg- 
ing of corporate risk exposure. 

FI 602 Corporate Valuation ^ 
and Business Strategy 

Prerequisite: A 621, EC 601 or EC 
604, FI 601 and QA 604. Examina- 
tion of valuation, investment and 
financing of the firm and their im- 
plications for strategic decision 
making. Topics include: objective 
of the firm and agency theory; 
strategies for the investment deci- 



Courses 145 



sion; short-term financial man- 
agement strategies; theories of 
choice and decision making; state 
preference theory and its implica- 
tions for planning and strategy; 
risk measurement and decision 
making; derivatives and their ap- 
plications to corporate risk man- 
agement and planning; efficient 
capital markets and value cre- 
ation; capital structure; valuation 
models and dividend policy; 
merger and acquisition strategies; 
the leasing decision and business 
planning; international financial 
management strategies. 

FI 605 Data Evaluation and 
Modeling 

Prerequisite: FI 601. Introduction 
to the quantitative models used in 
finance. Application of statistical 
and deterministic models to fi- 
nancial decision making. Use of 
electronic spreadsheets and sta- 
tistical software. 

FI 606 Advanced Data 
Evaluation and Modeling 

Prerequisite: FI 605. Evaluation of 
accounting data as inputs in the 
financial modeling process. Selec- 
tion and transformation of mana- 
gerial and financial accounting 
data and its use in financial deci- 
sion making. Use of parametric 
and nonparametric statistics and 
the spreadsheet as a data process- 
ing tool. Introduction to issues of 
professional ethics and regulatory 
constraints. 

FI 610 Capital Market 
^Theory 

Prerequisite: FI 601. A review of 
modern portfolio theory. Includes 
theory of choice under certainty 
and uncertainty; portfolio analy- 
sis; capital asset pricing model; 
arbitrage pricing model; global 
investing and portfolio forma- 
tion; and portfolio performance 
measurement, evaluation and se- 
lection. 



FI 611 Equity Market 
Valuation and Analysis 

Prerequisite: FI 601. Integrated 
review of investment opportuni- 
ties in the securities markets. In- 
cludes capital market efficiency 
and arbitrage; valuation models 
and individual security analysis 
and valuation; aggregate market 
analysis; capital market theory; 
global investing and portfolio 
performance; alternative invest- 
ments — analysis and valuation; 
and introduction to regulation 
and professional standards of eth- 
ics. 

FI 612 Applied Portfolio 
Management 

Prerequisite: completion of all 
M.S. Finance core courses. Course 
describes and demonstrates the 
dynamic decision-making pro- 
cess of portfolio management. 
The portfolio construction pro- 
cess, including the formulation of 
objectives, constraints and prefer- ' 
ences; the ongoing monitoring 
process; and conducting a perfor- 
mance evaluation. Special atten- 
tion to recent developments in 
dynamic portfolio applications. 

FI 613 Derivative Market 
Analysis and Trading 
Techniques 

Prerequisites: FI 610, FI 620. An 
examination of financial futures 
and options markets; futures and 
options pricing and hedging; 
trading techniques. 

FI 614 Real Estate Finance: 
Analysis and Valuation of 
Real Estate 

Prerequisites: FI 601, FI 610. An 
introduction to real estate finance. 
Topics include real estate valua- 
tion; debt service; mortgage credit 
and interest rates; sources of 
mortgage funds; government and 
housing finance; secondary mort- 
gage markets; buyers' and lend- 
ers' mortgage loan decisions; 
analysis for financing income 
properties; taxes and the invest- 



ment decision; loans for develop- 
ment and construction; recent in- 
novations and techniques. 

FI 620 Capital Markets and 
the Valuation of Fixed 
Income Securities 

Prerequisites: FI 601, FI 610. The 
function and structural trends of 
financial markets. Analysis of the 
flow of funds; foundation of inter- 
est rates; term structure of interest 
rates; determinants of interest 
rates; global financial markets. 

FI 621 Comparative Global 
Central Banking Policy 

Prerequisites: EC 604, FI 620. The 
focus is on monetary policy and 
its implications. Includes over- 
view of global financial systems, 
money supply measurement and 
creation, and impact of monetary 
policy on the economic and politi- 
cal environments. 

FI 625 Advanced Capital ^ 
Market Issues 

Prerequisites: FI 605, FI 620. An 
examination of current practices 
and new developments in the 
capital markets. Various topics 
will be selected that highlight re- 
cent developments. The primary 
areas of selection will be financial 
and capital market innovations, 
monetary policy, domestic and 
international money markets, 
techniques for analyzing financial 
markets. Students will be re- 
quired to complete a major, inde- 
pendent research project. 

FI 630 Corporate Financial 
Analysis and Applications 

Prerequisite: FI 620. The examina- 
tion of short-term financial man- 
agement, mergers and acquisi- 
tions, corporate restructuring, fi- 
nancial distress, corporate risk 
management, leasing and hybrid 
corporate securities. 

FI 631 Management of 
Financial Services 

Prerequisite: FI 620. An examina- 
tion of operational techniques 



146 



and strategies relevant to finan- 
cial management in the financial 
services industry. 

FI 632 International 
Financial Management 

Prerequisites: EC 604, Fl 601. Fo- 
cus on international capital mar- 
kets, determinants of foreign ex- 
change rates and hedging tech- 
niques. Major emphasis on man- 
aging and measuring accounting, 
economic and operations expo- 
sure; managing political risk; in- 
ternational capital budgeting and 
short-term financial manage- 
ment; international financing of 
investment. 

FI 635 Advanced Corporate 
Financial Management 
Issues 

Prerequisites: FI 602, FI 605. An 
examination of developments 
and techniques in financial man- 
agement, highlighting recent de- 
velopments. The primary area of 
selection will be value creation, 
human capital, globalization, risk 
management and strategic man- 
agement. Students w^ill be re- 
quired to complete a major re- 
search project. 

FI 640 Introduction to 
Financial Planning 

Prerequisite: FI 601. An overview 
of the financial planning process. 
Establishment of planning goals; 
the economic environment; com- 
munication skills; introductory 
coverage of investment analysis, 
risk management through insur- 
ance, employee benefit plans and 
estate planning. Electronic 
spreadsheets will be used exten- 
sively. 

FI 641 Risk Management 
Through Insurance 

Prerequisite: FI 640. Risk manage- 
ment and the use of insurance as 
a risk management tool. Various 
types of insurance are covered 
including life, auto, liability, dis- 
ability and homeowners' insur- 
ance as well as group and social 



insurance. Electronic spread- 
sheets will be used extensively. 

FI 642 Valuation of 
Employee Benefit Plans 

Prerequisite: FI 640. Fundamen- 
tals of retirement planning and 
employee benefit plans, defined 
contribution and defined benefit 
plans, tax impacts on employers 
and employees, and generahon of 
client-specific plans. Group life 
and group health insurance as 
part of employee benefit plans. 
Electronic spreadsheets will be 
used extensively. 

FI 643 Tax Issues in 
Financial Planning 

Prerequisite: FI 640. Taxation ter- 
minology, tax benefit calcula- 
tions, tax management tech- 
niques, tax implications of in- 
vestments and insurance prod- 
ucts along with a variety of top- 
ics relevant to business and per- 
sonal financial planning. Elec- 
tronic spreadsheets will be used 
extensively. 

FI 644 Estate Issues in 
Financial Planning 

Prerequisite: FI 640. Fundamen- 
tals of estate planning, principles 
of estate and gift taxation, trusts, 
property ownership, marital and 
charitable considerations, intra- 
family transfers, post-mortem 
planning and wills. Estate plan- 
ning is integrated with the finan- 
cial planning process. 

FI 645 Seminar: CFP Review 
and Research Project 

Prerequisites: FI 640 through FI 
644, or permission of instructor. 
Integration of financial planning 
topics presented through a set of 
comprehensive cases. Formally 
written, client-specific financial 
plans will be prepared for se- 
lected cases. A research project 
must be completed, focusing on 
approved financial planning top- 
ics. Prerequisites waived for CFPs 
enrolling in the course for con- 
tinuing education credits. 



FI 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

FI 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or 
permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under the 
supervision of an adviser. 

FI 693 Internship 

Prerequisites: six credits of ad- 
vanced finance coursework and 
approval of program coordina- 
tor/adviser. A program of field 
experience in a corporate or fi- 
nancial services organization. 

FI 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

FI 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

FI 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

FI 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 

FI 701 Seminar in Financial 
Policy 

Enrollment limited to doctoral 
students only. See page 172 for 
course description. 



Fire Science 

FS 625 Chemistry of Fires 
and Explosions 

An examination of the basic or- 
ganic chemistry and combustion 
and explosive properties of flam- 
mable materials. The chemical 
principles underlying fires and 
explosions. Chemical properties 
of various synthetic materials and 



Courses 147 



the products of their combustion. 
Fire retardant materials and 
chemicals used in fire exHnguish- 
ment. (See also CH 625.) 

FS 649 Fire Scene 
Investigation and Arson 
Analysis 

The techniques of crime scene 
documentation and investigation 
as they relate to fire and explosion 
scenes. Evidence recognition and 
collection. Laboratory analysis of 
fire scene, arson accelerant and 
explosion scene residues. Scientif- 
ic proof of arson. Laboratory fee 
required. 4 credits. (See also CJ 
649.) 

FS 661 Systems Approach to 
Fire Safety I 

The systems approach to fire 
safety as used by fire protection 
engineers, fire science technicians 
and fire administrators in analyz- 
ing and designing fire safety in 
buildings. Considers the various 
routes that can be followed to 
achieve low-budget, logical, cost- 
effective ways of accomplishing 
predetermined fire safety goals. 

FS 662 Systems Approach to 
Fire Safety II 

Prerequisite: FS 661. A continu- 
ation of Systems Approach to Fire 
Safety I. 

FS 664 Terrorism 

An understanding of the prob- 
lems of terrorism, as well as new 
developments in terrorist theory 
and strategies. Includes back- 
ground on international terrorists 
and terrorist organizations; 
terrorist profiles for the investiga- 
tor; terrorist situations, actions 
and reactions; assassinations; 
hostage situations; kidnap and 
ransom; arson and bombings; 
antiterrorist organizations. 

FS 665 Legal Aspects of Fire 
and Arson Investigation 

The legal principles underlying 
and governing the conduct of 
criminal investigations, with par- 



ticular emphasis on arson. The 
criminal law relating to arson, es- 
tablishment of the crime, investi- 
gation and prosecution proce- 
dures in arson cases. 

FS 666 Seminar on 
Industrial Fire Protection 

Prepares fire professionals to 
make decisions on various fire 
protection schemes in industry 
and other commercial property 
situations. Since fire protection re- 
sponsibilities are often delegated 
to the occupational safety or secu- 
rity manager, the course provides 
background in fire protection for 
these individuals. 

FS 667 Fire and Building 
Codes, Standards and 
Practices 

The study of building and fire 
codes and regulations as they re- 
late to the prevention and inci- 
dence of structural fires. Contem- 
porary building and fire codes 
and practices, and their enforce- 
ment. Model building codes. Fire 
prevention and control through 
building design. (See also CJ 667.) 

FS 668 Fire and Casualty 
Insurance Practices 

A study of financial risk and de- 
cision making from the inves- 
tigative point of view. Insurance 
rate making and relation to risk 
and other factors. Insurance ad- 
justment and economic factors 
that must be considered in fire 
and accident investigations. (See 
also CJ 668.) 

FS 669 Dynamics, 
Evaluation and Prevention 
of Structural Fires 

A detailed analysis of the evo- 
lution of modern structures and 
the mechanical systems necessary 
to provide safety and comfort. 
The effect of the nature of struc- 
tures and their mechanical sys- 
tems on fire behavior. Structural 
bases and mechanical systems for 
fire protection and fire preven- 
tion. (See also CJ 669.) 



FS 670 Selected Topics 

An examination and evaluation 
of the current and future prob- 
lems faced by today's fire, public 
safety, insurance and security 
professionals. 

FS 681 Seminar/Research 
Project in Public Safety 
Management I 

Prerequisite: 18 undergraduate/ 
graduate hours in a public safety 
discipline or permission of the 
program coordinator. Problems in 
public safety management and 
current techniques being used to 
deal with these problems. Re- 
quires a supervised research 
project directly related to the 
topic and weekly meetings with 
faculty throughout the term. For- 
mat for course may vary; a three- 
day specially scheduled seminar 
may be included. 

FS 682 Seminar/Research 
Project in Public Safety 
Management II 

A second course in the field of 
public safety management. See FS 
681 for course description. 

FS 683 Seminar/Research 
Project on Comparative 
Public Safety Systems 

Prerequisite: 18 undergraduate/ 
graduate hours in a public safety 
discipline or permission of the 
program coordinator. Examina- 
tion, assessment and comparison 
of various approaches used in 
protecting the public's health and 
safety. Current management ap- 
proaches to public safety prob- 
lems. Requires a supervised re- 
search project directly related to 
the topic and weekly meetings 
with faculty throughout the term. 
Format for course may vary; a 
three-day specially scheduled 
seminar may be included. 

FS 684 Fire/Accident Scene 
Reconstruction 

Application of the principles of 
reconstruction of the scene of a 
fire or accident, including proper 



148 



procedure for examining physical 
evidence to determine the cause. 
Emphasis on preparation of re- 
ports, testimony for hearings and 
trials, rendering of advisory opin- 
ions to assist in resolution of dis- 
putes affecting life and property. 
(See also CJ 684.) 

FS 690 Research Seminar 

Prerequisite: 30 graduate credit 
hours. A major research project 
under the supervision of the di- 
rector of the fire science program. 

FS 693 Internship 

The student's formal educational 
development complemented by 
field experience in various fire 
science settings or agencies. Un- 
der faculty supervision, the stu- 
dent engages in field experience 
and produces a comprehensive 
project report analyzing the in- 
ternship experience. 

FS 695 Independent Study 

A directed, independent learning 
experience with the topic and for- 
mat to be agreed upon by the stu- 
dent and supervising faculty. 

FS 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

FS 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



History 



HS 607 World History in the 
Twentieth Century 

A survey of major global events 
and trends since 1900. Advanced 
industrial societies emphasized, 
but coverage of major regions of 
the Third World also studied. In- 
cludes: the World Wars, patterns 
of economic cooperation and 
competition, decolonization and 
East- West conflicts. 



HS 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

HS 695 Independent Study 

A planned program of individual 
study or research under the su- 
pervision of a member of the fac- 
ulty. 



Hospitality and 
Tourism 

HT 600 Hospitality and 
Tourism Perspectives 

An introductory course designed 
to acquaint graduate students 
with the basic principles and phi- 
losophies of the hospitality and 
tourism industry. Emphasis on 
current and future trends in man- 
agement and operations. Includes 
the history and structure of hospi- 
tality and tourism organizations. 
No credit. 

HT 608 Food and Beverage 
Operations 

Prerequisite: HT 600 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Course pro- 
vides a solid foundation in the 
important aspects of food and 
beverage operations and manage- 
ment to include: menu planning 
with nutritional guidelines, safety 
and sanitation, financial and hu- 
man resource issues, service and 
production. Consumer and in- 
dustry trends are studied to pro- 
vide a focus of food and beverage 
market segmentation. Students 
participate in actual planning, 
service and production laborato- 
ries. 

HT 622 Lodging Operations 
and Management 

Prerequisite: HT 600 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Course pro- 
vides a solid foundation in the 
important aspects of lodging op- 
erations and management to in- 
clude: the rooms division, human 



resources, housekeeping, guest 
services and marketing. Con- 
sumer and industry trends are 
studied to provide a focus on 
lodging market segmentation and 
guest satisfaction. 

HT 625 Hospitality and 
Tourism Human Resources 

Prerequisite: HT 600. Examina- 
tion of human resource skills nec- 
essary for successful operation of 
hospitality and tourism facilities. 
Includes applications of organiza- 
tional behavior, selection, place- 
ment, training, supervision, 
evaluation, motivation and mo- 
rale, leadership and union-man- 
agement relations. 

HT 630 Dimensions in 
Tourism 

Prerequisite: HT 600. Study of the 
impact of tourism nationally and 
internationally. Exploration of 
factors related to significant in- 
creases of foreign visitors to a des- 
tination. Study of favorable bal- 
ance of payments created by more 
incoming tourists. Coping with 
fundamental change in a 
country's tourism industry and 
future directions in the industry. 

HT 635 Hospitality and 
Tourism Accounting 

Prerequisite: HT 600. Investi- 
gates financial management, 
planning and control at various 
levels within the hospitality and 
tourism industries. Includes in- 
terpretation of financial state- 
ments, working capital and cash 
management, investment deci- 
sion making, cost controls, and 
other financial topics related to 
hospitality and tourism. 

HT 642 Travel Markets: 
Business and Leisure 

Prerequisite: HT 630 or permis- 
sion of instructor. The study of 
business and leisure travelers 
through an investigation of their 
separate needs. Travelers' behav- 
ior is analyzed based on current 
trends, demographics, and edu- 



Courses 149 



cational and cultural situations. 
The expectations of both leisure 
and business travelers are ex- 
plored. Students will develop the 
knowledge and skills necessary to 
understand the creation of prod- 
ucts and marketing approaches as 
well as the management and ser- 
vice of these travel markets. 

HT 645 Philosophy of 
Service 

Prerequisite: HT 600. The philoso- 
phy of service from management, 
leadership and marketing per- 
spectives. Theories, concepts and 
models as well as industry-based 
procedures are studied as they 
relate to success in the service- 
oriented tourism and hospitality 
industries. The philosophy of ser- 
vice to both guests and employ- 
ees is discussed from the 
manager's and the employees' 
points of view. 

HT 650 Hospitality and 
Tourism Marketing 

Prerequisite: HT 630. Marketing 
strategies and concepts necessary 
for successful hospitality and 
tourism operations. Social, psy- 
chological, environmental, econ- 
omic and personal factors needed 
to develop marketing schemes for 
existing and new operations. 
Decision-making aspects of hos- 
pitality and tourism marketing. 

HT 655 Development of 
Hospitality and Tourism 
Operations 

Prerequisite: HT 635. Examina- 
tion of the process for developing 
profitable hospitality and tourism 
operations; feasibility planning 
and the formulation of the 
feasibility study are stressed. 
Characteristics, opportunities, 
risks and decisions involved in 
starting hospitality and tourism 
operations. 

HT 660 Hospitality and 
Tourism Information 
Systems 

Prerequisite: HT 600. Course is 



designed to introduce a variety of 
software applications for hospi- 
tality and tourism. Spreadsheet 
and database software of a cus- 
tomized and generalized nature 
will be utilized. Hospitality and 
travel reservations, food service 
management and nutritional ana- 
lysis form the basis of information 
systems approaches in hospitality 
and tourism. 

HT 670 Selected Topics 

An in-depth examination of top- 
ics in the field of hospitality and 
tourism which reflect the special 
interests of students and the 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

HT 678 Destinations: 
Resource Development and 
Management 

Prerequisite: HT 630 or permis- 
sion of instructor. This course 
studies the impact on resources 
resulting from tourism develop- 
ment-positive and negative. En- 
vironmental, economic and socio- 
cultural impacts on resources are 
emphasized. Course examines 
resource needs for the develop- 
ment of destinations. Further, the 
course investigates the concepts, 
theories and issues regarding the 
development and maturation of 
tourism destinations. Tourism 
master planning is studied as it 
guides development and subse- 
quent management of destina- 
tions. 

HT 680 Hospitality and 
Tourism Internship 

Prerequisite: completion of 24 
graduate credits and permission 
of the program coordinator. Struc 
tured, hands-on, supervisory 
work experience in a hospitality 
or tourism operation. Students 
work under the supervision of 
both personnel at the hospitality/ 
tourism operation and faculty 
members. 

HT 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 24 graduate credits 



and permission of the instructor. 
A structured, individual research 
project and study under the direct 
supervision of a research instruc- 
tor. May include both classroom 
discussion/presentation and 
independent research. 

HT 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
faculty member. 

HT 696 Independent 
Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study 1. 

HT 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 24 graduate credits. 
Periodic meetings and discussion 
of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

HT 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Humanities 

HU 651-658 Topics in 
Humanities 

A study of selected issues of par- 
hcular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

HU 659 Writing and 
Speaking for Professionals 

A practical, tool-oriented ap- 
proach for professionals who 
need to perfect writing and 
speaking skills for career ad- 
vancement or presentations in 
graduate courses. Students gener- 
ate work-related writing/speak- 
ing assignments and negotiate 
learning contracts based on edit- 
ing, writing and speaking meth- 
ods related to individual needs 
and objectives. (See also E 659.) 

HU 695 Independent Study 

A planned program of individual 
study or research under the su- 
pervision of a member of the fac- 
ulty 



150 



International 
Business 



IB 643 International 
Business 

Prerequisite: EC 601 . An introduc- 
tion to the political, economic, 
technological and cultural set- 
tings of international business. 
Examines the problems, policies 
and operational procedures of the 
multinational corporation, in- 
cluding the adjustment to foreign 
cultures and governments. Re- 
view of development, organiza- 
tion and structure of the interna- 
tional firm. 

IB 645 Comparative 
International Business 
Environments 

Prerequisites: IB 643, MK 609. A 
comparative approach to the 
study of the noneconomic aspects 
of foreign markets of several rep- 
resentative areas in the world. 
Focus on the interaction between 
the sociocultural environment of 
host nations and the multina- 
tional firm. 

IB 650 International 
Business Negotiating 

Prerequisite: IB 643. A description 
and analysis of the various stages 
involved in the international 
business negotiating process. 
Also, a survey of the different 
types of values and behaviors 
encountered in business negotiat- 
ing. Case studies of representa- 
tive countries are included. 

IB 651 International 
Marketing 

Prerequisites: IB 643, MK 609. The 
application of marketing prin- 
ciples and techniques in a global 
environment. A managerial ap- 
proach to international marketing 
as it pertains to product policies, 
market channels, pricing, adver- 
tising in a foreign market. Em- 
phasis on marketing in different 
cultural settings. 



IB 652 Multinational 
Business Management 

Prerequisites: IB 643, MK 609. An 
examination of global strategy, 
ownership control, organization 
and resource management. Major 
attention given to international 
risk analysis. 

IB 660 East and Southeast 
Asian Business Systems 

Prerequisites: IB 643 and MG 637, 
or permission of the adviser for 
international business. An analy- 
sis of the business systems of se- 
lected nations in East and South- 
east Asia. Emphasis on the his- 
torical, political and cultural un- 
derpinnings of business activi- 
ty. Negotiating strategies and 
techniques to be used with select- 
ed East and Southeast Asian gov- 
ernments and firms. 

IB 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the student and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

IB 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
and permission of the instructor. 
Independent study under the su- 
pervision of an adviser. 

IB 693 Internship 

Prerequisites: Six credits of IB 
concentration courses and ap- 
proval of internship coordinator. 
A program of field experience in 
selected organizations in interna- 
tional trade and marketing. 

IB 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

IB 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

IB 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Perioaic meetings and discus- 
sion of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 



IB 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Industrial 
Engineering 

IE 601 Introduction to 
Operations Research/ 
Management Science 

Prerequisite: IE 607. Introduction 
to the techniques and philoso- 
phies of management science and 
operations research. Includes: lin- 
ear programming, inventory 
analysis, queueing theory, dy- 
namic programming, decision 
analysis and other modeling tech- 
niques. 

IE 604 Management Systems 

Techniques of industrial and gov- 
ernmental systems management 
including general systems and 
organizational theory. 

IE 607 Probability Theory 

Prerequisite: M 610 or equivalent. 
Probability of events. Random 
variables and expectations; dis- 
crete and continuous distribu- 
tions; important standard distrib- 
utions and applications; moment 
generating functions; central limit 
theorem. 

IE 609 Descriptive and 
Inferential Statistics 

Prerequisite: IE 607 or equivalent. 
Inferential statistical designs, in- 
cluding basic statistical tests and 
analysis of variance. Statistical 
theories and application of cor- 
relation analysis, multiple linear 
regression, nonlinear regression 
and analysis of covariance. 

IE 611 Decisions in 
Operations Management 

Prerequisites: MG 637 and QA 
604, or equivalents. Study of orga- 
nizations as systems producing 
goods and services. Review of 
concepts, functions and basic 
techniques as applied to opera- 
tions management. Examination 



Courses 151 



of new trends and developments 
such as just-in-time, synchronous 
manufacturing, quaUty manage- 
ment, cycle-time reduction and 
concurrent engineering. Empha- 
sis on interrelations of different 
operational decisions on the final 
product and competitive position 
of the organization. (See also MG 
614.) 

IE 612 Managerial 
Interactions I 

An interdisciplinary systems ap- 
proach to human behavior in or- 
ganizations with emphasis on the 
impact of industrial engineering 
methods on organizational per- 
formance. Deals with individual 
motivation and face-to-face in- 
teraction in managerial roles. 

IE 613 Managerial 
Interactions II 

Prerequisite: IE 612. Continuation 
of IE 612. Organizational devel- 
opment, job enrichment and 
modern work attitudes. 

IE 614 Data Information 
Systems 

Prerequisites: any one of CS 603 
through CS 610 or equivalent, IE 
604. Introduction to automated 
information systems planning 
and operations and their impact 
on management decision making, 
control functions and communi- 
cation capabilities. An overview 
of concepts and procedures with 
applications in urban environ- 
ments, large organizations and 
governmental agencies. Tech- 
niques presented include PERT/ 
CPM, Gantt charting, cost-benefit 
analysis. 

IE 615 Transportation and 
Distribution 

Prerequisite: IE 601 or equivalent. 
Introduction to transportation 
science with emphasis on physi- 
cal distribuHon problems. Survey 
of operations research models 
and optimization strategies and 
their roles in transportation sys- 
tems management. 



IE 621 Linear Programming 

Prerequisite: IE 601 or equivalent. 
Thorough coverage of the tech- 
niques and applications of linear 
programming. Special simplex 
forms and optimality conditions, 
duality and sensitivity are cov- 
ered. Applications to network 
flow problems. 

IE 622 Queueing Theory 

Prerequisite: IE 601 or equivalent. 
Elements of queueing theory in- 
cluding finite and infinite cases. 
Single server and multiple server 
parallel channels/series queues 
and special cases are analyzed. 

IE 623 Decision Analysis 

Prerequisite: IE 609 or equivalent. 
Decision theory, game theory; 
benefit-cost analyses under un- 
certainty; advanced engineering 
economic analysis. 

IE 624 Quality Analysis 

Prerequisite: IE 609 or equivalent. 
Concepts of quality and statistical 
quality analysis. Sampling tech- 
niques and decision processes. 

IE 625 Advanced 
Mathematical Programming 

Prerequisites: CS 606, IE 621. Ad- 
vanced mathematical pro- 
gramming techniques. Integer 
programming, goal program- 
ming, and multiple objective lin- 
ear programming techniques will 
be covered. Computer applica- 
tions will be demonstrated. 

IE 643 Reliability and 
Maintainability 

Prerequisite: IE 609 or QA 604. 
The basic theory and methodolo- 
gy of reliability and main- 
tainability, including application 
of discrete and continuous distri- 
butions and statistical designs. 
Reliability, estimation, structure 
models and growth models. 

IE 651 Human Engineering I 

An introduction to the design of 
machines, jobs and environments 
with consideration of ergonomic 
principles. Coverage of behav- 



ioral, anatomical, physiological 
and organizational factors affect- 
ing performance, comfort and 
safety. 

IE 652 Human Engineering II 

Prerequisite: IE 651 or equivalent. 
Continuation of IE 651. In-depth 
analysis of selected topics in ergo- 
nomics including work physiol- 
ogy, anthropometry and signal 
detection theory. Laboratory ex- 
periments and reports included. 
Laboratory fee required. 

IE 655 Manufacturing 
Analysis 

Prerequisite: undergraduate courses 
in manufacturing or manufactur- 
ing work experience and consent 
of instructor. The principles of the 
theory of metal cutting and metal 
working for improving the manu- 
facturing operations involving 
metal machining and metal work- 
ing. An opportunity for the stu- 
dents to thoroughly understand 
the experimental approaches 
used in manufacturing. Labora- 
tory fee required. 

IE 671 Current Topics in 
Operations Research 

Prerequisite: IE 601 or permission 
of instructor. An examination of 
new developments or current 
practices in operations research. A 
topic will be selected for thorough 
study. Possible subject areas in- 
clude nonlinear programming, 
network theory, scheduling tech- 
niques, specialized techniques, 
specialized applications. Content 
may vary from trimester to tri- 
mester. 

IE 672 Current Topics in 
Industrial Engineering 

Prerequisite: IE 601 or permission 
of the instructor. An examination 
of new developments or current 
practices in industrial en- 
gineering. A topic will be selected 
for thorough study. Possible sub- 
ject areas include reliability, pro- 
duction engineering, human fac- 
tors, specialized applications. 



152 



Content may vary from trimester 
to trimester. 

IE 681 System Simulation 

Prerequisites: IE 601, CS 606 or 
permission of the instructor. 
Methods of modeling and simu- 
lating man-machine systems. 
Thorough coverage of discrete 
event simulation. Random num- 
ber generators and variate gen- 
erations discussed. Use of a simu- 
lation package and several 
projects will be required. 

IE 682 Advanced System 
Simulation 

Prerequisite: IE 681 or equivalent. 
Emphasis will be on model build- 
ing and on design and analysis of 
simulation experiments for service 
and manufacturing systems. Stu- 
dent projects in real environments 
are required. 

IE 683 Systems Analysis 

Prerequisites: IE 601 or QA605, IE 
614. Techniques and philosophies 
defining the concept of systems 
analysis presented in detail; illus- 
trated with large-scale case stud- 
ies. Diverse systems are analyzed 
covering the social, urban, indus- 
trial and military spheres. Tech- 
niques include utility theory, de- 
cision analysis and technological 
forecasting. 

IE 685 Theory of 
Optimization 

Prerequisites: IE 601; CS 606 or 
equivalent. Methods of nonlinear 
optimization and programming. 
Search methods including golden 
section and dichotomous; con- 
strained and unconstrained opti- 
mization including Rosenbrocks 
and Fletcher-Powell algorithms. 
Penalty and barrier function 
methods. 

IE 686 Inventory Analysis 

Prerequisites: IE 601, IE 607 or QA 
605. Inventory theory and practi- 
cal applications in operating in- 
ventory systems. Model construc- 
tion, optimization and computer 
simulation. 



IE 687 Stochastic Processes 

Prerequisite: IE 601 or equivalent. 
The theory and application of dis- 
crete and continuous-time sto- 
chastic processes. Areas of appli- 
cation include queueing, inven- 
tory, maintenance and probabilis- 
tic dynamic programming mod- 
els. 

IE 688 Design of 
Experiments 

Prerequisite: IE 609 or equiva- 
lent. Principles of modern 
statistical experimentation and 
practice in use of basic designs 
for scientific and industrial ex- 
periments; single factor experi- 
ments, randomized blocks, Latin 
squares; factorial and fractional 
factorial experiments, surface fit- 
ting designs. 

IE 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
and permission of the program 
coordinator. Independent study 
under the guidance of an adviser 
into an area of mutual interest, 
such study terminating in a tech- 
nical report of academic merit. 
Research may constitute a survey 
of a technical area in industrial 
engineering or operations re- 
search, or may involve the solu- 
tion of an actual or hypothetical 
technical problem. 

IE 695 Independent Study I 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
program coordinator. Indepen- 
dent study under the guidance of 
an adviser into an area designated 
by the program coordinator. 

IE 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

IE 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

IE 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



IE 704 Seminar in 
Management and Control 
Systems 

Enrollment limited to doctoral 
students only. See page 172 for 
course description. 



Business Law 

LA 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

LA 673 Business Law I: 
Contracts and Sales 

A study of the legal aspects of 
contracts and the results of con- 
tractual obligations. Legal prob- 
lems stemming from the sale of 
goods, including the rights and 
duties of buyers and sellers and 
the remedies available to them. 

LA 674 Business Law II: 
Business Organizations and 
Negotiable Instruments 

Prerequisite: LA 673. Introduction 
to problems of formation and op- 
eration of legal groups with par- 
ticular emphasis on the law of 
agencies, partnerships and corpo- 
rations. Includes the law of nego- 
tiable instruments. 

LA 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or 
permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under the 
supervision of an adviser. 

LA 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

LA 696 Independent 
Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

LA 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 



Courses 153 



sion of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

LA 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Logistics 



LG 660 Logistics Technology 
and Management 

Designed to provide to the stu- 
dent a broad survey of the wide 
range of logistics activities. Sub- 
jects covered: the concepts of the 
integrated logistics management 
system, customer interfaces, in- 
ventory management and sup- 
port of spares and supplies, 
physical distribution manage- 
ment as v^ell as the logistical orga- 
nization planning and adminis- 
tration. Includes the quantitative 
analytic techniques and computa- 
tional tools commonly used in the 
logistical decision-making pro- 
cess. 

LG 663 Logistics in 
Acquisition and 
Manufacturing 

Managing the logistics processes 
in system and equipment acquisi- 
tion; organizing the logistics func- 
tion in both single-plant and 
multisite, multinational manufac- 
turing. Customer support strate- 
gies and interfaces with 
multimodel transportation. 

LG 665 Integrated Logistics 
Support Analysis 

Designed to provide students 
with an opportunity to under- 
stand the concept of Integrated 
Logistics Support (ILS) and an 
overview of each of the elements 
of logistics specialties, their inter- 
face and interaction, as well as the 
integration of the separate logis- 
tics specialties into a coherent ef- 
fort and output. Includes: reliabil- 
ity, maintainability life-cycle cost, 
ILS management and major ILS 
decisions involved, test and sup- 



port equipment and personnel, 
and training warranties. 

LG 669 Life Cycle Cost 
Analysis 

Theory and application of life 
cycle cost analysis applicable to 
both defense and commercial de- 
cision support processes. Tech- 
niques for assessing the life char- 
acteristics, projected costs, recy- 
cling and salvage possibilities; 
income and investment streams 
of large capital projects including 
new factories, advanced weapons 
systems, new products and trans- 
portation/distribution systems. 
Coverage includes total lifetime 
cost structures, effectiveness and 
efficiency criteria, cost modeling 
and management decision mak- 
ing. 

LG 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

LG 672 Designing for 
Logistics Support 

Overview of strategies and tech- 
niques for securing good logistics 
support through product design, 
manufacturing, inventory man- 
agement, field maintenance, and 
customer education and training. 
Discussion of automation, smart 
systems, cost-effectiveness trade- 
offs and use of operations re- 
search optimization. 

LG 673 Human Engineering 
in Logistics Support 

Study of the human element in 
logistics and the role of human 
engineering in creating high per- 
formance supply, repair and re- 
placement activities. Adverse 
conditions and hostile environ- 
ments analyzed. User feedback, 
simulation and artificial intelli- 
gence in the framework of design, 
training and end-use perfor- 
mance. 

LG 675 Logistics Policy 

Review of developing logistics 



policy in both the defense and 
commercial sectors in the U.S. as 
well as in foreign countries. Stan- 
dardization, off-the-shelf and 
computer-assis ted logistics (CALS) 
policies are analyzed. Trends in 
TQM, JIT, ISO 9000, warranties, 
environmental impact and litiga- 
tion are included as topical areas. 

LG 676 Logistics Products 

Description of logistics products 
and systems in the context of de- 
liverable documents, databases, 
data acquisition, software and 
skilled manpower. Study of the 
logistics management function in 
defense-related organizations and 
the consequences of a growing lo- 
gistics emphasis, including orga- 
nizational design to meet cus- 
tomer needs and government reg- 
ulations. 

LG 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or 
permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under the 
supervision of an adviser. 

LG 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

LG 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

LG 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sion of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

LG 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Mathematics 

M 605 Biostatistics 

A non-calculus-based course 
which includes basic concepts of 
probability and statistics. These 
concepts are applied to problems 
in human biology, industrial/oc- 



154 



cupational health and epidem- 
iology. Introduction to and use of 
the computer package SPSSx for 
data analysis. (See also BI 605.) 

M 610 Fundamentals of 
Calculus 

Prerequisite: M 115 (pre-calculus 
mathematics) or equivalent. Re- 
view of algebra and trigonometric 
functions. Topics from calculus, 
including differentiation and in- 
tegration methods applied to 
problems in science, business and 
the social sciences. A review of 
series. 

M 615 Linear Mathematics 
and Combinatorics 

Prerequisite: M 610 or equivalent. 
Discrete mathematics topics used 
extensively in computer science, 
including linear algebra, graph 
theory and combinatorics. Em- 
phasis on applications to com- 
puter science. 

M 616 Applied Modem 
Algebra for Computer 
Science 

Prerequisite: M 615. Advanced 
topics in logic and combinatorics 
as well as an introduction to dis- 
crete modern algebra and its ap- 
plications to computer science. 

M 620 Numerical Analysis 

Prerequisites: a minimum of 12 
credit hours of undergraduate 
mathematics, including calculus 
and linear algebra; knowledge of 
a computer programming lan- 
guage such as Pascal, C program- 
ming, FORTRAN or BASIC. Top- 
ics include: solution of transcen- 
dental equations by iterative 
methods; solution of systems of 
linear equations (matrix inver- 
sion, etc.); interpolation, nu- 
merical differentiation and inte- 
gration; solution of ordinary dif- 
ferential equations. 

M 624 Applied Mathematics 

Prerequisite: a minimum of 12 
credit hours of undergraduate 
mathematics, including calculus 



and differential equations. Special 
functions; Fourier series and inte- 
grals; integral transforms (Fou- 
rier, Laplace, etc.) and their use in 
solution of boundary value prob- 
lems. 

M 632 Methods of Complex 
Analysis 

Prerequisite: graduate standing in 
engineering or mathematics. A 
study of the applications of the 
methods of complex variables to 
engineering and physical sci- 
ences. Includes: analytic function 
theory, contour integration and 
conformal mapping. 

M 670 Selected Topics 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
instructor. A study of selected 
topics of particular interest to the 
students and instructor. May be 
taken more than once. 

M 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or 
permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under the 
supervision of an adviser. 

M 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty 

M 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

M 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

M 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I 



Molecular Biology 

MB 601 Protein 
Biochemistry and 
Enzymology 

Prerequisites: undergraduate or- 
ganic chemistry and biochemis- 



try. This first of three basic bio- 
chemistry courses examines the 
relationship between protein 
structure and function. Topics in- 
cluded are properties of amino 
acids, peptides and proteins, pep- 
tide synthesis, protein isolation 
and sequencing, aspects of pro- 
tein folding, enzyme kinetics and 
enzyme regulation. 

MB 602 Biochemistry of 
Bioenergetics 

Prerequisites: undergraduate or- 
ganic chemistry. This course is 
strongly recommended for stu- 
dents lacking undergraduate bio- 
chemistry. Examination of the 
major anabolic and catabolic 
pathways and their regulation. 
Catabolic pathways for the oxida- 
tion of hexoses, lipids and amino 
acids are considered. These pro- 
cesses lead to the formation of a 
chemiosmotic gradient capable of 
driving ATP synthesis. Discus- 
sion of the anabolic pathways 
starts with the generation of a 
similar chemiosmotic gradient by 
light absorption or other energy 
releasing pathways leading to 
production of carbohydrates, lip- 
ids, amino acids and nucleotides. 

MB 603 Biochemistry of 
Information Pathways 

Prerequisites: undergraduate or- 
ganic chemistry and biochemis- 
try. Examination of the biochem- 
istry of information storage and 
retrieval within cells. Topics are 
divided into three major areas: 
nucleic acid biochemistry; control 
of gene expression; receptor-ef- 
fector interactions. 

MB 607 Cellular Biology 

An introduction to cellular struc- 
ture and function. Examination of 
the role of biological membranes 
in cellular activity and forming 
functional compartments within 
organelles. The function of other 
cellular and extracellular struc- 
tures, such as cytoskeleton and 
extracellular matrix. Additional 
topics include receptor structure 



and function, cellular signalling, 
differentiation and motility. 

MB 611 Molecular Biology 
of Proteins with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: MB 601 or under- 
graduate molecular biology and 
biochemistry. Techniques for 
working with proteins that are 
basic to the cell and molecular 
biologist and extend beyond the 
understanding of basic protein 
biochemistry. Course provides a 
theoretical understanding of 
methods commonly utilized for 
protein/peptide analysis. In the 
laboratory, students will isolate 
proteins from various tissues or 
expression systems and analyze 
them by one- and two-dimen- 
sional polyacrylamide gel electro- 
phoresis. 4 credits; laboratory fee. 

MB 613 Molecular Biology 
of Nucleic Acids with 
Laboratory 

Prerequisites: MB 603 or under- 
graduate molecular biology and 
biochemistry. An examination of 
gene expression and the tech- 
niques available for manipulating 
DNA and RNA. This course uti- 
lizes an intense laboratory com- 
ponent to instruct students in the 
practical and technical aspects of 
working with nucleic acids. 4 
credits; laboratory fee. 

MB 620 Computer 
Applications in Cell and 
Molecular Biology with 
Laboratory 

Prerequisite: MB 613 or under- 
graduate molecular biology. Pro- 
vides students with a working 
knowledge of computer applica- 
tions needed for research and 
teaching in molecular biology 
along with exposure to the rudi- 
ments of designing these pro- 
grams. Modern academic and in- 
dustrial research facilities increas- 
ingly depend on computer analy- 
sis for data acquisition and inter- 
pretation. It is therefore essential 
that students in molecular biol- 
ogy receive training in this area. 



Students will learn (in lecture and 
lab settings) DNA and protein 
data entry, analysis of gene struc- 
ture, and database searching. Stu- 
dents will also be taught decision- 
making skills in data interpreta- 
tion through the use of applica- 
tion software. 4 credits. 

MB 636 Immunology 

Study of the immune response in 
animals including cells and or- 
gans of the immune system, im- 
munogens, MHC, cytokines, 
TCR, antibodies and comple- 
ment. 3 credits. 

MB 644 Cellular 
Development 

Prerequisite: MB 607. The course 
covers control of differentiation 
and development at the cellular 
level. Topics include cell cycle con- 
trol, embryological development, 
programmed cell death, wound 
healing and chronic wounds. 

MB 648 Cytoskeleton and 
Extracellular Matrix 

Prerequisite: MB 607. The cy- 
toskeleton provides cues for pat- 
terns of division and the molecu- 
lar motors needed for cell motil- 
ity. The extracellular matrix also 
contains cues for the cells that are 
differentiating, providing highly 
localized signals and pathways 
for cellular migration. This course 
examines the roles of the cytosk- 
eleton and extracellular matrix in 
cellular movement, differentia- 
tion and function. 

MB 650 Oncogenes and 
Cytokines 

Prerequisite: MB 607. The prod- 
ucts of oncogenes induce cancer 
in animals and transformed phe- 
notypes in cultured cells. Often 
the products are analogues of 
cytokines or cytokine receptors. 
This course examines oncogenes 
and their role in transformation, 
cell cycle control and cellular dif- 
ferentiation. 

MB 656 Receptor Effector 
Systems 

Prerequisite: MB 603. Cellular re- 



Courses 155 

ceptors and their effector systems 
are responsible for the ability of 
cells to detect and respond to 
stimuli. These proteins are of criti- 
cal importance to the develop- 
ment of drugs to control the func- 
tion of cells. This course examines 
the structure of receptors from ion 
channels to DNA binding pro- 
teins, followed by an examination 
of the signalling pathways that 
propagate the signal through the 
cell. Also covered, the design and 
interpretation of binding studies 
for receptor ligand interactions. 

MB 670 Selected Topics 

Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. An examination of topics 
of special interest to students and 
faculty. May be taken more than 
once. 

MB 680 Graduate Seminar 

Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. Weekly discussions of 
current scientific literature and 
student and faculty research 
projects. May be taken more than 
once. 1 credit. 

MB 688 Internship I 

Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. Laboratory and research 
experience will be developed un- 
der the supervision of an outside 
researcher. A portion of the in- 
ternship must be devoted to the 
completion of a research report. 
The instructor will monitor the 
student's progress through regu- 
lar meetings and evaluation of the 
final report. 

MB 689 Internship II 

A continuation of Internship I. 

MB 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. An independent research 
project/program under the su- 
pervision of a member of the fac- 
ulty. 

MB 695 Independent 
Study I 

Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. A planned program of 



156 



independent study under the 
supervision of a member of the 
faculty. 

MB 696 Independent 
Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

MB 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
and permission of coordinator. 
Supervised preparation of a thesis 
describing the student's research. 

MB 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Mechanical 
Engineering 

ME 602 Mechanical 
Engineering Analysis 

Topics in vector calculus and com- 
plex variables. Solution of partial 
differential equations as applied to 
mechanical engineering. 

ME 604 Numerical 
Techniques in Mechanical 
Engineering 

Prerequisite: knowledge of C pro- 
gramming or FORTRAN. Review 
of matrix algebra and simulta- 
neous equations. Numerical inte- 
gration and differentiation, in- 
cluding techniques such as Euler, 
Runge-Kutta, Milne, shooting, 
Crank-Nicolson and FEM. Em- 
phasis on numerical solutions to 
ordinary and partial differential 
equations relevant to mechanical 
engineering. 

ME 605 Finite Element 
Methods in Engineering 

Prerequisite: ME 604. Basic con- 
cepts underlying the FEM. Dis- 
placement and weighted residual 
formulations of the finite element 
approach to numerical solutions. 
Applications to one- and two-di- 
mensional problems in areas such 
as elasticity, heat transfer and 
fluid mechanics. 



ME 610 Advanced Dynamics 

Kinematics and dynamics of 
single particles and systems of 
particles. Lagrange's equations. 
Hamilton's principle and canoni- 
cal transformation theory. The in- 
ertia tensor and rigid body mo- 
tion. 

ME 611 System Vibrations 

Advanced techniques for analysis 
of vibrations in mechanical sys- 
tems. Multiple degrees of free- 
dom and random noise inputs 
among topics covered. 

ME 612 Random Vibrations 

Prerequisite: ME 602 or consent of 
the instructor. Review of the 
theory of stochastic processes. 
Stationary and nonstationary sto- 
chastic excitations. Random 
vibrations of single degree-of- 
freedom systems. Response of 
multiple degree-of-freedom sys- 
tems to random loads. Random 
vibrations of continuous systems. 
Nonlinear system analysis. 
Method of averaging and multi- 
scales. Introduction to nonlinear 
random vibrations. Method of 
Fokker-Planck equation. Pertur- 
bation, equivalent linearization, 
stochastic averaging and other 
approximate techniques. Applica- 
tions to mechanical, civil and 
earthquake engineering problems. 

ME 613 Fundamentals of 
Acoustics 

Basic theory of acoustics in sta- 
tionary media; plane, cylindrical 
and spherical waves; reflection, 
transmission and absorption 
characteristics; sources of sound; 
propagation and attenuation in 
ducts and enclosures. 

ME 615 Theory of Elasticity 

Index notation; Cartesian tensors 
and coordinate transformation; 
stress tensor and field equation; 
analysis of stress and strain in two 
and three dimensions; Airy stress 
function; applications to prob- 
lems of torsion and bending; ex- 
perimental methods. 



ME 620 Classical 
Thermodynamics 

Phenomenological equilibrium 
and nonequilibrium thermody- 
namics. Formulation and applica- 
tion of fundamental laws and con- 
cepts; chemical thermodynamics. 

ME 625 Mechanics of 
Continua 

Tensor analysis, stress vector and 
stress tensor, kinematics of defor- 
mation, material derivative, fun- 
damental laws of continuum me- 
chanics, conservation theorems, 
constitutive laws and representa- 
tive applications. 

ME 627 Computer-Aided 
Engineering 

Prerequisite: consent of instruc- 
tor. Integration of computers into 
the design cycle. Interactive com- 
puter modeling and analysis. 
Geometrical modeling with wire 
frame, surface and solid models. 
Finite element modeling and 
analysis. Problems solved involv- 
ing structural, dynamic and ther- 
mal characteristics of mechanical 
devices. 

ME 630 Advanced Fluid 
Mechanics 

Advanced topics from among the 
following areas: perfect fluids, 
viscous fluids, turbulence, 
boundary layer theory, surface 
phenomena, shock waves and gas 
dynamics. 

ME 632 Advanced Heat 
Transfer 

Review of the basic concepts of 
conduction and radiation. De- 
tailed treatment of laminar, 
turbulent, free and forced convec- 
tional flows. Computer projects. 

ME 635 Dynamic Systems 
and Control 

Introduction to the modeling of 
dynamic systems. Emphasis on 
the analysis of first and higher 
order continuous-time linear mo- 
dels. Feedback techniques with 
examples from various branches 
of mechanical engineering. 



Courses 157 



ME 638 Measurement and 
Instrumentation in 
Mechanical Engineering 

Measurement principles, in- 
cluding error analysis. Instru- 
ment systems: sensing, transmit- 
ting and terminating devices. 
Typical systems and devices for 
measuring motion, force, stress, 
strain, pressure, flow and tem- 
perature. 

ME 645 Computational 
Fluid Dynamics and Heat 
Transfer 

Prerequisites: ME 604, ME 630. 
Current methods of computer 
solutions of the conservation 
equations of fluid dynamics. Vis- 
cous, incompressible, compress- 
ible and shock flows. Real gas 
equations of state. Computer 
projects. 

ME 655 Interfacing 
Mechanical Devices 

Prerequisite: knowledge of C pro- 
gramming. Interfacing the real 
world of mechanical devices to a 
stand-alone PC. How to write C 
programs for monitoring and 
control of PC motors, encoders, 
stepper motors, AC heaters and 
AC fans. Practical uses of thermal, 
mechanical, optical and Hall Ef- 
fect sensors. 

ME 670 Selected Topics 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
instructor. A study of selected 
topics of particular interest to the 
students and instructor. May be 
taken more than once. 

ME 690 Research Project 

Prerequisites: 15 graduate hours 
and written permission of pro- 
gram coordinator. Independent 
study under the guidance of a fac- 
ulty adviser, such study ter- 
minating in a technical report of 
academic merit. Research may 
constitute a survey of a technical 
area in mechanical engineering, 
or may involve the solution of an 
actual or hypothetical technical 
problem. 



ME 695 Independent 
Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

ME 696 Independent 
Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

ME 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 18 graduate credit 
hours. Periodic meetings and dis- 
cussions of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the preparation 
of a thesis. 

ME 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Management 

MG 610 The Sports Industry 

Prerequisite: MG 637. Focuses on 
management concepts and busi- 
ness skills as they relate to the 
sports industry. An in-depth look 
at the organizational structure 
and method of operation of major 
sectors of the sport enterprise; ex- 
amination of important contem- 
porary issues in the sports indus- 
try. 

MG 611 Sport Industry 
Marketing, Promotion and 
Public Relations 

A study of marketing, promotion 
and public relations strategies 
utilized in various aspects of the 
sport industry. Marketing sport 
as a product and marketing of 
nonsport products using sport as 
a promotional tool are exanuned. 

MG 612 Sports Law 

An analysis of contract law, tort 
law, antitrust law, labor law, col- 
lective bargaining and adminis- 
trative law as they apply to sport. 
Provides sport managers with the 
fundamental legal knowledge 
necessary to operate in the in- 
creasingly complex sport envi- 
ronment. 



MG 613 Sports Facility 
Management 

An examination of how sports 
facilities such as coliseums, mu- 
nicipal and college stadiums, and 
multipurpose civic centers are 
managed. Among the topics in- 
cluded: booking and scheduling 
of events, box office management, 
staging and event production, 
personnel management, conces- 
sions and merchandising man- 
agement. 

MG 614 Decisions in 
Operations Management 

Prerequisites: MG 637 and QA 
604, or equivalents. Study of orga- 
nizations as systems producing 
goods and services. Review of 
concepts, functions and basic 
techniques as applied to opera- 
tions management. Examination 
of new trends and developments 
such as just-in-time, synchronous 
manufacturing, quality manage- 
ment, cycle-time reduction and 
concurrent engineering. Empha- 
sis on interrelations of different 
operational decisions on the final 
product and competitive position 
of the organization. (See also IE 
611.) 

MG 630 Management 
Information Systems in 
Health Care 

Introduction to the use of com- 
puters in the health care field. 
The inner components of comput- 
ers; various types of software 
available for health care. Review 
of the history of information sys- 
tems and their applications in 
health care settings. 

MG 637 Management 
Process 

A study of the traditional func- 
tions of management: planning, 
organizing, directing, controlling 
and coordinating along with an 
analysis of human behavior in or- 
ganizations and the exploration 
of new paradigms in business and 
management systems. 



158 



MG 638 Cost Benefit 
Management 

Prerequisites: EC 601, FI 601 and 
QA 604. An introduction to and 
overview of the field of cost/ben- 
efit management. Fundamental 
theoretical evaluation of cost/ 
benefit of a project. Includes: the 
selection of the best investment 
criteria, the external environmen- 
tal spillover effects and the appli- 
cation of cost/benefit manage- 
ment in decision making under 
uncertainty. 

MG 640 Management of 
Health Care Organizations 

Identification of the character- 
istics of health care organizations 
and the dimensions of manage- 
ment in such organizations. Ex- 
amination and application of the 
principles of management neces- 
sary for the successful operation 
of health care organizations. 

MG 641 Managing the 
Quality Process 

Prerequisites: MG 637, QA 604. 
Views and scope of an emerging 
total quality management para- 
digm. Topics include achieving 
total customer satisfaction; the 
teachings of total quality manage- 
ment (underlying principles, 
methodologies and techniques in 
establishing, operating and man- 
aging quality programs in a com- 
pany); requirements, specifica- 
tions and costs of quality and qual- 
ity assurance; Deming's rules; 
Motorola's Six-Sigma program; 
creating a quality climate. 

MG 642 New Business 
Development from 
Technology 

Prerequisite: MG 637. The process 
of commercializing technology 
and the managerial skills and pro- 
fessional expertise needed to sup- 
port a strong commercial de- 
velopment effort. Intrapreneur- 
ing; factors that affect success and 
failure of product innovations, 
enhancements and incremental 
changes; alternative approaches 



to coupling the R and D function 
to the marketing function and the 
marketplace; cycle-time reduc- 
tion; concurrent engineering; cost 
leadership;produchvity improve- 
ment. 

MG 645 Management of 
Human Resources 

A study of organizational prac- 
tices in the management of hu- 
man resources. Manpower plan- 
ning, recruitment, selection, train- 
ing, compensation and con- 
temporary problems of the field. 

MG 650 Entrepreneurship 

Prerequisites: A 621, FI 601, MG 
637, MK 609, or permission of the 
instructor. Deals with the es- 
tablishment of a new business 
venture, covering such topics as 
site development, market analy- 
sis, staffing, inventory control, 
personnel relations and funding. 

MG 655 Corporate 
Governance and Business 
Strategy 

Prerequisites: MG 637. The pri- 
mary participants who determine 
the direction and performance 
(i.e., governance) of corporations 
are the shareholders, the manage- 
ment and the board of directors. 
The rights, obligations and im- 
pacts of these direct participants 
in corporate governance are ex- 
plored along with the roles that 
various corporate constituents 
can, do and should play in deter- 
mining corporate direction, strat- 
egy and performance. 

MG 660 Comparative 
Management 

Prerequisite: MG 637. A study 
and comparison of managerial 
systems and practices in different 
organizations and/or countries 
throughout the world. A concep- 
tual framework is developed to 
analyze the interaction between 
managerial processes and cul- 
tural factors as they affect busi- 
ness activity. 



MG 661 Development of 
Management Thought 

Prerequisite: MG 637. Study of the 
literature from various disciplines 
in order to determine the thinking 
and practices of leaders of organi- 
zations, past and present. The his- 
torical perspective of man- 
agement thought. The contribu- 
tions of religion, philosophy, eco- 
nomics, sociology and psychol- 
ogy to management thought and 
practice. Emphasis on pioneering 
works in the management of or- 
ganizations. Case studies of the 
thinking and practices of famous 
leaders of American business en- 
terprises. 

MG 662 Organization 
Theory 

Prerequisite: MG 637. A survey of 
the literature on theories of or- 
ganization with emphasis on con- 
temporary theories. Application 
of the theories to management 
and organizational problems will 
be attempted. Difficulties arising 
between theory and practice will 
be examined. 

MG 663 Leadership and 
Team Building 

Prerequisite: MG 637. Exami- 
nation of the impact of theories 
and research findings that are rel- 
evant to leadership and team 
building in organizations. The 
role of the leader and teams in 
organizations; the knowledge 
and skills required for successful 
leadership and team building. 
Assessment of one's own leader- 
ship and team-building capabili- 
ties. 

MG 664 Organizational 
Effectiveness 

Prerequisite: MG 637. Identifi- 
cation of the criteria necessary for 
developing and maintaining ef- 
fective organizations. A stuay of 
the concepts that may be utilized 
in the management of these crite- 
ria. Approaches that may be ex- 
aminee: and applied to problem 
situations through cases and role 
playing. 



Courses 159 



MG 665 Compensation 
Administration 

Prerequisites: EC 625 and MG 645 
or permission of instructor. A 
study of the compensation func- 
tion in organizations. Estab- 
lishing wages and salaries, fringe 
benefits and incentives. 

MG 667 Multicultural 
Issues in the Workplace 

Overview of theory and practice of 
diversity in the workplace; exami- 
nation of the impact of changing 
workforce demographics on cur- 
rent and future productivity and 
competitiveness of organizations. 
Various forms of bias; methods for 
overcoming negative impact. 
Implementation of diversity pro- 
grams; self-awareness of attitudes 
and behavior toward diverse 
groups. Issues addressed include 
gender, race, age, religion, sexual 
orientation, physical ability, vet- 
eran status. 

MG 669 Strategic 
Management 

Prerequisite: completion of all 
core and advanced courses in the 
M.B.A. curriculum. This course 
examines management policies 
and strategies for the complex 
organization operating in a dy- 
namic environment from the 
viewpoint of top-level executives 
of the organization. It also devel- 
ops analytic and systemic frame- 
works for the management of 
numerous elements involved in 
assuring the fulfillment of the 
goals of the total organization and 
integrates the student's general 
business knowledge with knowl- 
edge acquired in the M.B.A. cur- 
riculum. Emphasis on develop- 
ment of oral and written skills by 
examination and discussion of 
cases and by other appropriate 
instructional methods. Comple- 
tion of a significant project is re- 
quired as part of this course. 

MG 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 



instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

MG 678 Personnel 
Management Seminar 

Prerequisites: EC 625, MG 637, 
MG 645 and P 619, or permission 
of instructor. A seminar in the per- 
sonnel and manpower manage- 
ment function of the modern 
work organization. The use of an 
integrated behavioral, quanti- 
tative and systems approach per- 
mits an applied multidisciplinary 
synthesis of the various aggregate 
manpower management subsys- 
tems required in the modern 
work organization. 

MG 679 Industrial Relations 
Seminar 

Prerequisites: EC 625, EC 687, MG 
637 and P 619, or permission of 
instructor. A seminar in industrial 
relations and the labor- 
management relations function of 
the modern work organization. 
The use of an integrated behav- 
ioral, economic and legal ap- 
proach permits an applied multi- 
disciplinary synthesis of the em- 
ployee relations function required 
in either nonunionized or union- 
ized work organizations. 

MG 680 Current Topics in 
Business Administration 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or 
permission of the instructor. An 
integrative course examining the 
role of business in society and re- 
lating the business firm to its so- 
cial, political, legal and economic 
environments. While the exact 
content of this seminar is ex- 
pected to vary from trimester to 
trimester in accordance with the 
varied academic interests and 
professional backgrounds of dif- 
ferent faculty handling the 
course, the basic theme is the role 
of the business firm as the 
"keeper" of the market mecha- 
nism and the means for organiz- 
ing resources in the economy. 



MG 685 Research Methods 
in Business Administration 

Prerequisite: At least 24 graduate 
hours including QA 604 or 
equivalent. Designed to familiar- 
ize administrators with methods 
of business and social research 
and to assist them in the presenta- 
tion, interpretation and applica- 
tion of research data. 

MG 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or 
permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under the su- 
pervision of an adviser. 

MG 694 Internship 

Prerequisite: 24 credits of gradu- 
ate work. An on-the-job learning 
experience with a selected organi- 
zation, arranged for course credit 
and under the supervision of a 
faculty adviser. 

MG 695 Independent 
Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

MG 696 Independent 
Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

MG 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sion of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

MG 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 

MG 701 Research Design I 

Enrollment limited to doctoral 
students only. See page 172 for 
course description. 

MG 702 Research Design II 

Enrollment limited to doctoral 
students only. See page 172 for 
course description. 

MG 737 Seminar in 
Management 

Enrollment limited to doctoral 



260 



students only. See page 172 for 
course description. 

MG 738 Policy and Strategic 
Decision Making 

Enrollment limited to doctoral 
students only. See page 172 for 
course description. 

MG 801 Dissertation I 

Enrollment limited to doctoral 
students only. See page 172 for 
course description. 

MG 802 Dissertation II 

Enrollment limited to doctoral 
students only. See page 172 for 
course description. 

MG 803 Dissertation III 

Enrollment limited to doctoral 
students only. See page 172 for 
course description. 

MG 804 Dissertation IV 

Enrollment limited to doctoral 
students only. See page 172 for 
course description. 



Marketing 



MK 609 Marketing 

An intensive study of modern 
marketing fundamentals in a di- 
verse, global economy; study of 
the decision-making problems 
encountered by marketing man- 
agers, using lectures and case 
studies. 

MK 616 Buyer Behavior 

Prerequisite: MK 609. An ex- 
amination of the principal com- 
prehensive household and 
organizational buyer behavior 
models and the behavioral sci- 
ence theories on which such ap- 
plied models are based. Analysis 
of the buyer at the individual 
level, at the social level and at the 
organizational level. 

MK 621 Marketing 
Financial Services 

Prerequisites: PI 601, MK 609. An 
intensive study of the modern 
marketing fundamentals and 



how they apply to the financial 
services industry. Special atten- 
tion on the insurance, banking 
and securities industries. 

MK 632 Nonprofit and 
Services Marketing 

Prerequisite: MK 609. An exami- 
nation of the service product in 
for-profit and not-for-profit orga- 
nizations. Unique tools for analy- 
sis of service quality and the ser- 
vice encounter, including the 
roles of the customer and the ser- 
vice provider in service produc- 
tion, service expectations and 
scripts, and positioning. Commu- 
nication and management strate- 
gies for service expectations, de- 
mand management and organiza- 
tional flexibility. 

MK 638 Competitive 
Marketing Strategy 

Prerequisites: MK 609 plus three 
additional graduate credits in 
marketing. Focuses on product, 
price distribution and promotion 
strategies that will give a com- 
pany a competitive advantage. 
Also, corporate self-appraisal, 
market segmentation and com- 
petitor evaluation. 

MK 639 Marketing Research 
and Information Systems 

Prerequisites: MK 609, QA604. A 
managerial approach to mar- 
keting information flow, includ- 
ing recognition of information 
needs and an overview of market- 
ing research as part of an informa- 
tion system. Special attention to 
evaluation of research design and 
measurement methods, effective 
utilization of research output and 
problems encountered in estab- 
lishing a marketing information 
system. 

MK 641 Marketing 
Management 

Prerequisite: MK 609. The treat- 
ment of the basic decision prob- 
lems of marketing management 
in terms of a conceptual frame- 
work for analysis. Consideration 



of the role played by human judg- 
ments and the mathematical tools 
available to aid in these judg- 
ments in a number of marketing 
areas, notably market analysis, 
pricing decisions, advertising de- 
cisions, promotional decisions 
and selection of distribution 
channels. 

MK 643 Product 
Management 

Prerequisite: MK 609. The search 
for new product ideas and their 
evaluation; the organization 
structure necessary to the devel- 
opment and introduction of new 
products and the management of 
a product line; the commercial as- 
pects of product design, packag- 
ing, labeling and branding; con- 
siderations involved in making 
product deletion decisions; and 
the social and economic effects of 
managing product innovation. 

MK 645 Distribution 
Strategy 

Prerequisite: MK 609. Analysis of 
channel strategies, theory and 
economic justification of distribu- 
tion channels, direct and indirect 
methods of control, behavioral 
states of channel members, cost- 
ing the channel and management 
of changes in distribution. 

MK 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

MK 680 Marketing 
Workshop 

Centers around a structural model 
of a business firm. The major ob- 
jective is to provide the student 
with an opportunity to develop 
managerial insights and skills in 
dealing with marketing problems 
in a competitive environment. Par- 
ticipants are grouped into deci- 
sion-making units (companies) 
and each student assumes the role 
of a marketing executive operating 
a business firm. These executives 



Courses 161 



will be responsible for planning, 
organizing, staffing, directing and 
controlling their firm's resources. 

MK 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or 
permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under the 
supervision of an adviser. 

MK 693 Internship 

Prerequisites: Six credits of MK 
concentration courses and ap- 
proval of internship coordinator. 
A program of field experience in 
selected organizaHons in market- 
ing and public relations. 

MK 695 Independent 
Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

MK 696 Independent 
Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

MK 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

MK 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 

MK 701 Seminar in Strategic 
Marketing 

Enrollment limited to doctoral 
students only. See page 172 for 
course description. 



Nutrition 

NU 601 Nutritional 
Biochemistry I — 
Fundamentals 

Prerequisite: undergraduate course 
in organic chemistry or introduc- 
tory biochemistry. Lectures exam- 
ining the structures, properties 
and metabolism of four major 
classes of bio-organics (carbohy- 



drates, lipids, proteins/amino ac- 
ids, nucleic acids/nucleotides) 
with special attention to their bio- 
logic roles and nutritional aspects 
of their metabolism. 

NU 602 Nutritional 
Biochemistry II — 
Applications 

Prerequisite: NU 601. Lectures 
emphasize integration and con- 
trol of metabolic pathways and 
also survey certain areas of 
biochemistry and molecular biol- 
ogy with their interconnections 
with genetics, disease and patient 
management, including dietary 
modifications. 

NU 603 Nutritional 
Physiology 

Prerequisites: undergraduate 
course in organic chemistry or in- 
troductory biochemistry plus a 
course in human physiology or 
cell biology. Selected tissue/or- 
gan systems and their specific re- 
lation to nutrition. Overview of 
renal physiology, the endocrine 
system, essentials of gastrointes- 
tinal tract physiology, cardiovas- 
cular system, excitable tissues 
(nerve and muscle), cell physiol- 
ogy, cell membranes and trans- 
port functions. 

NU 604 Vitamin Metabolism 

Prerequisites: NU 601, NU 603. 
Study and integration of the 
chemistry, biochemistry, physi- 
ology, pharmacology, and nutri- 
tional aspects of vitamin metabo- 
lism in humans. Chemical no- 
menclature, structure-function 
relationships; structural analogs 
and antagonists; methods and 
principles of measurement and 
assessment of status; food 
sources; digestion; absorption; 
transport; tissue uptake and dis- 
tribution; intracellular meta- 
bolism; storage; excretion; bio- 
chemical function(s); correlation 
of clinical features of excess and 
deficiency with metabolic roles; 
vitamin-nutrient and vitamin- 
drug interactions; the role of vita- 



mins in therapeutics and prophy- 
laxis. 

NU 605 Mineral Metabolism 

Prerequisites: NU 602, NU 604. 
Study and integration of the 
chemistry, biochemistry, physi- 
ology, and nutritional aspects of 
mineral metabolism in humans. 
Chemical forms; structural ana- 
logs and antagonists; methods 
and principles of measurement 
and assessment of status; food 
sources; digestion; factors influ- 
encing bioavailability; absorp- 
tion; transport; tissue uptake and 
distribution; intracellular me- 
tabolism; storage; excretion; bio- 
chemical function(s); correlation 
of clinical features of excess and 
deficiency with metabolic roles; 
mineral-nutrient and mineral- 
drug interactions; and the role of 
minerals in therapeutics and pro- 
phylaxis. 

NU 609 Research 
Methodology in Nutrition 

The course focuses on under- 
standing the methods of nutrition 
research. Topics include advan- 
tages/disadvantages of various 
study designs; tools used in di- 
etary assessment; measurement 
and interpretation; concepts and 
applications in nutrition from bio- 
statistics and epidemiology. 

NU 610 Nutrition and 
Disease I 

Prerequisites: NU 602, NU 604. 
Discussion of certain disorders 
having nutritional implications; 
particular emphasis on the etiolo- 
gy and pathogenesis (including 
dietary factors), as well as diagno- 
sis and treatment approaches (past 
and current). Rationales for inclu- 
sion of dietary alterations in the 
prophylacHc and therapeutic ap- 
proaches. Disorders include renal 
disease and hypertension; athero- 
sclerosis and cardiovascular dis- 
ease; energy balance, obesity and 
eating disorders; metabolic bone 
disease, osteoporosis; diabetes 
mellitus. 



162 



NU 611 Nutrition and 
Disease II 

Prerequisites: NU 602, NU 604. 
Continuation of discussion of nu- 
tritionally related disorders be- 
gun in Nutrition 610: cancer; 
gastrointestinal disorders, hepa- 
tobiliary disease; acquired im- 
mune deficiency syndrome 
(AIDS); connective tissue disor- 
ders, arthritis; trauma and infec- 
tion in the critically ill; other dis- 
orders, depending on significance 
and student interest. 

NU 612 Nutrition and 
Health — Contemporary 
Issues and Controversies 

Prerequisite: NU 605. Application 
of nutritional science to the main- 
tenance of good health and body 
function after childhood. Topics 
will vary with student/faculty 
interests and current issues in 
nutritional science. 

NU 613 Maternal and Child 
Nutrition 

Prerequisite: NU 605, or per- 
mission of program director. 
Physiology of pregnancy; mater- 
nal nutrition and outcomes of 
pregnancy, at-risk pregnancies: 
teratogens and teratogenic effect 
of nutrient deficiency or excess; 
nutrition and lactation, breast 
milk vs. formulas; nutrition and 
fertility; nutrition in growth and 
development; nutrient needs of 
infants and children; infant feed- 
ing and nutrition. 

NU 614 Public Health 
Nutrition and Assessment 

Prerequisite: NU 605. Interface 
between nutritional science and 
the broad area known as public 
health. Quantity, quality and 
safety of the food supply; food ad- 
ditives and labeling; regulatory 
agencies; research approaches to 
food, nutrition, and disease; pro- 
cedures used in nutritional assess- 
ment of individuals. 

NU 670 Selected Topics 
Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or 



permission of program director. A 
study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. 

NU 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or 
permission of program director. 
Independent research/project car- 
ried out under the supervision of 
a faculty adviser and resulting in 
a written research report in the 
area of human nutrition. 

NU 695 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or 
permission of program director. A 
planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 



Psychology 



P 605 Survey of Community 
Psychology 

An examination of historical roots 
and current concepts. A social- 
problems approach to psy- 
chological dysfunction. Changing 
professional roles. Community 
organization and human service 
delivery; strategies of interven- 
tion and community change. 

P 607 Special Problems in 
Community Psychology 

Theory and practice of com- 
munity psychology with selected 
problems, populations and set- 
tings. Emphasis on community 
psychology service issues and 
problems in the Connecticut area. 

P 608 Psychometrics and 
Statistics 

Prerequisite: intermediate under- 
graduate course in statistics. 
Comprehensive introduction to 
fundamental conceptual and 
technical aspects of measurement 
and psychological description of 
individuals. In-depth treatment 
of statistical issues such as ad- 
vanced correlation and regression 
techniques using SPSSx statistical 
software to enhance understand- 



ing of key concepts. Emphasis on 
application of measurement and 
statistics to psychological assess- 
ment in field settings. 

P 609 Research Methods 

Prerequisite: undergraduate course 
in statistical methods. Intro- 
duction to analytic concepts per- 
tinent to sampling techniques, 
research design, variable control 
and criterion definition. Basic 
problems of measurement, re- 
search paradigms, sources of er- 
ror in research interpretation, 
problems of variable identifica- 
tion and control, and consider- 
ation of the logic of inference. 

P 610 Program Evaluation 

Prerequisite: P 609. A systematic 
study of the processes involved in 
planning, implementing and 
evaluating organizational pro- 
grams. Focus on action research 
strategies which integrate the en- 
tire process from planning to 
evaluation of the program. 

Practicum Seminars and 
Fieldwork (P 611 - P 616): 

An apprenticeship or on-the-job 
role in an ongoing program or 
center. Emphasis on developing 
conceptualizations and insights 
as a result of involvement in the 
apprenticeship. Placement at a 
field site for eight to 10 hours per 
week. Weekly class meetings 
serve two purposes: to present 
specific theoretical material and 
research findings appropriate to 
each seminar and to allow stu- 
dents to discuss their field train- 
ing experiences. A comprehen- 
sive project report is required in 
which each student will analyze 
and integrate fieldwork experi- 
ence with relevant research and 
coursework. 

P 611 Individual 
Intervention Seminar 

An examination of strategies for 
providing direct helping services 
to individuals in the context of 
formal and informal networks of 



social and community support. 
Includes: the nature of the dyadic 
relationship, development of 
therapeutic and case manage- 
ment skills, professional ethics 
and supervision. Applications to 
a wide range of problems, popu- 
lations and settings. 

P 612 Consultation Seminar 

An examination of the consul- 
tation process. Includes: the role 
of the consultant, stages of 
consultation, the development of 
consulting skills and political/ 
ethical issues. Different ap- 
proaches to consultation practice 
are analyzed, along with their as- 
sociated interventions. 

P 613 Systems Intervention 
Seminar 

An examination of the dynamics 
of planned, system-level change 
in the field of human services. 
The distinctive characteristics of 
human service organizations are 
analyzed; and an overall inter- 
vention model is developed, ap- 
plied and discussed. Of special 
interest to those with responsibili- 
ties in program planning and im- 
plementation. 

P 614 Individual 
Intervention Fieldwork 

Supervised field training in the 
provision of direct services to in- 
dividual clients. Supervision is 
jointly provided by tne field set- 
ting and the psychology depart- 
ment. Students must be available 
for at least one day per week. Per- 
mission of instructor is required. 

P 615 Consultation 
Fieldwork 

Supervised field training in the 
development of consultation 
skills. Supervision is jointly pro- 
vided by the field setting and the 
psychology department. Students 
must be availaole for at least one 
day per week. Permission of in- 
structor is required. 

P 616 Systems Intervention 
Fieldwork 

Supervised field training in pro- 



gram planning and development. 
Supervision is jointly provided by 
the field setting and the psychol- 
ogy department. Students must 
be available for at least one day 
per week. Permission of in- 
structor is required. 

P 619 Organizational 
Behavior 

Analysis of various theories of 
business and managerial behav- 
ior emphasizing the business 
organization and its internal pro- 
cesses. Psychological factors in 
business and industry, including 
motivation, incentives and con- 
flict. A study of research findings 
relevant to an understanding and 
prediction of human behavior in 
organizations. 

P 620 Industrial Psychology 

Prerequisite: P 608 or QA 604. 
Psychological theories and re- 
search applied to business and 
other organizations. Problems 
and methods in selection and 
placement, training, performance 
appraisal, criterion development 
and ergonomics. 

P 621 Behavior Modification 
I: Principles, Theories and 
Applications 

Theory and research in behavior 
modification. Aversive learning, 
desensitization, operant condi- 
tioning. Applications in clinical 
and nonclinical settings. 

P 622 Behavior Modification 
II: Advanced Theory, 
Assessment and Application 
in Mental Retardation 
Settings 

Prerequisites: P 621 and P637. 
Behavior modification and be- 
havioral assessment applied to 
the mentally retarded. Use of to- 
ken economies, cognitive behav- 
ior modification, problems in- 
volved in the use of aversive tech- 
niques, advanced assessment 
techniques. 

P 623 Psychology of the 
Small Group 

Analyses of the behavior and in- 



Courses 163 

teraction of people in mutual 
gratification groups, committees, 
work groups and clubs. 

P 624 Experiential Self- 
Analytic Group 

This experiential group develops 
understanding of group and in- 
terpersonal dynamics through 
analysis of ongoing interaction 
and improves participants' inter- 
personal abilities relevant to orga- 
nizational consulting and diagno- 
sis. Written permission to register 
for this course must be obtained 
directly from the program coordi- 
nator and /or instructor. 

P 625 Life Span 
Developmental Psychology 

In-depth exploration of normal 
and abnormal development 
through the life cycle. Emphasis 
on childhood, adolescence, adult- 
hood and later years. Develop- 
mental impact of family, neigh- 
borhood, schooling, work, culture. 
Issues of class, ethnicity, gender, 
age, etc. Applications of theory 
and research to community treat- 
ment and prevention. 

P 628 The Interview 

The interview as a tool for in- 
formation gathering, diagnoses, 
mutual decision making and be- 
havior change. Use of role play- 
ing provides the student with in- 
sights into nuances of interper- 
sonal relationships. Applications 
to selection, counseling and other 
situations. 

P 629 Introduction to 
Psychotherapy and 
Counseling 

Theory, research and practice of 
psychotherapy and counseling. 
Examination of the assumptions, 
roles and processes of the thera- 
peutic relationship. 

P 632 Group Treatment and 
Family Therapy 

Introduction to group and family 
approaches to psychotherapy. 
Factors important to the success- 
ful therapeutic group are dis- 
cussed. 



164 



P 634 Personality 
Assessment 

A critical survey of the theories 
and issues of personality assess- 
ment. Includes: intelligence, 
achievement and ability assess- 
ment. Personality tests and ethi- 
cal questions associated with 
psychological testing. Laboratory 
fee required. 

P 635 Assessment of Human 
Performance with 
Standardized Tests 

Prerequisite: P 608. Theories, as- 
sumptions and constraints un- 
derlying construction and appli- 
cation of standardized tests em- 
ployed in clinical, educational, 
governmental and industrial set- 
tings. Emphasis on selection of 
appropriate standardized tests 
for specific applications. 

P 636 Abnormal Psychology 

Etiological factors in psycho-pa- 
thology dynamics and classifi- 
cation of neuroses, psychophysio- 
logic conditions, psychoses, per- 
sonality disorders, organic illness, 
retardation and childhood dis- 
eases. 

P 637 Mental Retardation: 
History, Theory and Practice 

Definition of mental retardation, 
criteria for legal diagnosis, classi- 
fication systems, causes of retar- 
dation and syndrome descrip- 
tions. Structure of the care and 
management system in Con- 
necticut, the philosophy govern- 
ing the system, detailed descrip- 
tion of the system and of how it is 
financed. 

P 638 Psychology of 
Communication and 
Opinion Change 

Characteristics of the source, the 
situation and the content of mes- 
sages, along with other variables 
influencing attitudinal mod- 
ification. Cognitive factors and 
social settings in attitude change. 



P 640 Industrial Motivation 
and Morale 

Prerequisite: P 619 . The meaning 
of work, theories of motivation, 
values and expectations, per- 
formance and reinforcement, job 
satisfaction and motivation, pay 
as an incentive, interventions to 
increase work motivation. 

P 641 Personnel 
Development and Training 

Identification of skills and devel- 
opmental needs, both from an or- 
ganizational and individual per- 
spective. Techniques for assess- 
ment and development of skills, 
especially at the managerial level. 
Training approaches. Evaluation 
of training efforts. 

P 642 Organizational 
Change and Development 

Prerequisite: P 619 or MG 637. The 
nature of organization develop- 
ment, intervention by third-party 
consultation, change in organiza- 
tion structure and role relation- 
ships, evaluation of change ef- 
forts, participation, conformity 
and deviation. 

P 643 The Psychology of 
Conflict Management I 

The constructive management of 
conflict at the individual, cor- 
porate and multicultural levels. 
Theories on the etiology of con- 
flict as well as various conflict res- 
olution models. The role of com- 
munication and perspective-tak- 
ing in the constructive resolution 
of conflict. Students will learn 
how to manage more construc- 
tively their own personal conflicts 
as well as conflicts occurring at 
the corporate and multicultural 
levels. 

P 644 Performance 
Measurement 

Theory and applications associ- 
ated with performance appraisal 
systems in organizations. Empha- 
sis is on the development and 
implementation of valid ap- 
praisal systems. 



P 645 Seminar in Industrial/ 
Organizational Psychology 

Prerequisites: P 609 and P 619. An 
examination of the professional 
psychologist at work in organi- 
zations. Regular subjects include: 
measurement methods, predic- 
tion, validation, selection, train- 
ing and employee assistance pro- 
grams, group dynamics, organ- 
izational change, stress, perfor- 
mance appraisal. Practitioners in 
business, industry, research org- 
anizations and government will 
provide insights into the applica- 
tion of psychological principles 
and methods. 

P 646 The Psychology of 
Conflict Management II 

Prerequisite: P 643. Students will 
be trained in basic negotiation 
and mediation skills with super- 
vised practice of these skills. Skill 
development will enable students 
to resolve conflicts more effec- 
tively as well as help build the 
tools necessary for those inter- 
ested in becoming a mediator or 
organizational consultant special- 
izing in conflict management. 

P 660 Contemporary Issues 
in Industrial/Organizational 
Psychology 

Prerequisite: 12 hours in psy- 
chology or consent of the instruc- 
tor. In-depth investigation of topi- 
cal areas of concern in industrial / 
organizational psychology. Top- 
ics may include, but are not lim- 
ited to, the impact of EEOC regu- 
lations on selection and pro- 
motion; assessment centers; the 
role of the consultant in organiza- 
tions; flextime, day care and other 
strategies to accommodate family 
needs of employees; stress in 
work settings; women in manage- 
ment. Content will be stated at the 
time the course is scheduled. Stu- 
dents may petition for a particu- 
lar topic they feel would fit their 
academic goals. May be taken 
twice. 

P 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 



Courses 165 



instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

P 678 Practicum I 

For students already employed in 
a managerial or supervisory role. 
A job-related research project is 
carried out under faculty super- 
vision. 

P 679 Practicum II 

A continuation of Practicum I. 

P 693 Organizational 
Internship I 

For students without experience 
at the managerial or supervisory 
level. Under faculty supervision, 
the student engages in field expe- 
rience in an industrial setting and 
produces a comprehensive pro- 
ject report analyzing the in- 
ternship experience. 

P 694 Organizational 
Internship II 

A continuation of Organizational 
Internship I. 

P 695 Individual Intensive 
Study I 

Prerequisite: completion of re- 
quired courses or 24 graduate 
hours and written approval of de- 
partment chair. Provides the 
graduate student with the oppor- 
tunity to delve more deeply into 
a particular area of study under 
faculty supervision. 

P 696 Individual Intensive 
Study II 

A continuation of Individual In- 
tensive Study I. 

P 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: completion of all re- 
quired courses or 24 graduate 
hours and written approval of de- 
partment chair. Periodic meetings 
and discussions of the individual 
student's progress in the prepara- 
tion of a thesis. 

P 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



P 719 Topics in Applied 
Behavioral Science 

Enrollment limited to doctoral 
students only. See page 172 for 
course description. 



Public 

Administration/ 
Health Care 

PA 601 Principles of Public 
Administration 

The development, organization, 
functions and problems of na- 
tional, state and local govern- 
mental administration. 

PA 602 Public Policy 
Formulation and 
Implementation 

The relationship between public 
administration and the formu- 
lation of public policy is studied. 
The implementation of public 
policy by administrators based on 
the politics of the administrator is 
examined in terms of interaction 
between various group 
representatives such as legisla- 
tors, politicians and pressure- 
group leaders. 

PA 604 Communities and 
Social Change 

Interactions among the com- 
munity as a social organization 
and education, police and welfare 
institutions within it; special at- 
tention to conceptual frameworks 
and current research or action 
programs that particularly affect 
minority groups. 

PA 611 Research Methods in 
Public Administration 

Recommended prerequisite: un- 
dergraduate course in quantita- 
tive methods or introductory sta- 
tisHcs. Designed to familiarize ad- 
ministrators with the tools and 
potentialities of social research, 
and to assist them in the presenta- 
tion, interpretation and applica- 
tion of research data. 



PA 620 Personnel 
Administration and 
Collective Bargaining in the 
Public Sector 

Study of the civil service systems 
in the United States and the state 
governments, including a system- 
atic review of the methods of re- 
cruitment, promotion, discipline, 
control and removal. Explores the 
effects on work relationships of 
collective bargaining statutes 
which have been adopted by leg- 
islatures. Emphasis is placed on 
collective bargaining case studies 
from state and local governments 
and hospitals. 

PA 625 Administrative 
Behavior 

Recommended prerequisite: PA 
601. The problems faced by an 
administrator in dealing with in- 
terpersonal relationships and hu- 
man processes. Analysis of in- 
dividual and group behavior in 
various governmental and busi- 
ness settings to determine the ad- 
ministrative action for the promo- 
tion of desired work perfor- 
mance. Emphasis given to the 
public sector. Participation in ac- 
tual problem situation discus- 
sions and case studies. 

PA 630 Fiscal Management 
for Local Government 

Recommended prerequisite: PA 
601. The problems faced by a sur- 
vey of the essential principles of 
governmental accounting, bud- 
geting, cost accounting and finan- 
cial reporting. The various 
operating funds, bonded debt, 
fixed assets, investments, classifi- 
cation of revenue and expendi- 
tures, general property taxes and 
interfund relationships. 

PA 632 Public Finance and 
Budgeting 

Recommended prerequisite: PA 
601. State and local expenditure 
patterns, state and local revenue 
sources, income taxation at the 
state and local levels, excise taxa- 
tion, sales taxation, taxation of 



166 



capital and the property tax. Em- 
phasis on fiscal and economic as- 
pects of federalism and federal/ 
state fiscal coordination. The role 
of the budget in the determina- 
tion of policy, in administrative 
integration and in control of 
government operations. 

PA 641 Financial 
Management of Health Care 
Organizations 

Theory and application of fi- 
nancial planning and manage- 
ment techniques in health care or- 
ganizations. Emphasis on finan- 
cial decision making and on 
preparation of short-term and 
long-term cash, capital, revenue 
and expense budgets and finan- 
cial plans to meet the require- 
ments of HCFA and other third 
parties. 

PA 642 Health Care Delivery 
Systems 

A contemporary analysis of 
health care delivery systems in 
the U.S. Financial, cost, economic, 
political and organizational is- 
sues will be discussed. 

PA 643 Health and 
Institutional Planning 

Designed to develop skills and 
understanding of the dynamics of 
health and social planning pro- 
cesses with respect to consumer 
demand, national and local health 
goals and the optimal location of 
facilities, services and manpower. 

PA 644 Administration of 
Programs and Services for 
the Aged 

The structure, function and prop- 
erties of publicly and privately 
funded programs and service or- 
ganizations providing health ser- 
vices to the aged. The economic, 
political, legal and social issues 
which affect the administration 
of human service organizations 
will be studied, with emphasis 
on administration of health care 
services. 



PA 645 Health Care 
Economics and Finance 

Recommended prerequisite: PA 
641. Integration of accounting, 
economics, finance, budgeting 
and health insurance principles, 
concepts and analytic tools which 
are essential to the decision-mak- 
ing processes of health care orga- 
nizations. 

PA 646 Organization and 
Management of Long-Term 
Care Facilities 

Examines the variety of systems 
providing long-term care services 
for the aged. Special concentration 
on the ways various facilities are 
managed and on the impact of 
state bylaws. Case studies illus- 
trate decision making and prob- 
lem solving within health in- 
stitutions. 

PA 647 Alternative Health 
Care Delivery Systems 

A survey of nontraditional ap- 
proaches to health care. Includes: 
cost shifting, cost sharing, the de- 
velopment of outpatient facilities 
and the impact of cost contain- 
ment regulation in a systems-ori- 
ented framework. 

PA 648 Contemporary Issues 
in Health Care 

Gives health care professionals a 
broad view of current topics in 
their field. The students will view 
current videotapes, work on case 
studies, participate in class exer- 
cises and present several reports. 
Current articles illustrate the is- 
sues under discussion. 

PA 649 History and 
Development of Health 
Care Institutions 

Historical development of health 
care institutions and its effect on 
the current economic and social 
status of those institutions. 

PA 651 Health Care Ethics 

Explores and defines wide spec- 
trum of critical ethical issues; fac- 
tors that should be considered in 



resolving these issues; investi- 
gation of ways in which organiza- 
tions can anticipate and plan for 
future ethical problems. 

PA 652 Introduction to 
Managed Care 

Managed care concepts including 
types, structures, financial in- 
centives, administrative tools and 
marketing approaches; relation- 
ships between provision of med- 
ical care and various types of 
managed care organizations; em- 
phasis on health maintenance or- 
ganizations (HMOs) and pre- 
ferred provider organizations. 
Management structures, quality 
assurance, utilization manage- 
ment, financial functions and 
health insurance alternatives. 

PA 653 Cost Containment in 
Health Care 

Overview of methods used to at- 
tempt to constrain the rise of 
health care costs; practical ap- 
proaches to cost containment as 
well as skills necessary to imple- 
ment and evaluate cost contain- 
ment strategies. 

PA 657 Health Care 
Reimbursements 

Ways reimbursements are reg- 
ulated and collected; financial im- 
plications of third party reim- 
bursements for all types of health 
care providers. Focus on history 
as well as current and future pro- 
grams related to the most compli- 
cated payment methods in any in- 
dustry. 

PA 659 Human Resource 
Planning in Health Care 

Exploration of principles and 
functions of human resource 
planning in a health care organi- 
zation. Topics include legal and 
public policy parameters, demo- 
graphics and the health care 
workforce, disparate employee 
groups and their special concerns, 
implementation and evaluation 
of human resource planning in 
health care settings. 



Courses 167 



PA 660 Urban Planning: 
Theory and Practice 

Explores the concept of physical 
planning within the urban de- 
velopmental framework. The 
function of planning in its rela- 
tionship to the environment. 
Comprehensive planning with its 
many ramifications involving the 
various sections of our society. 
Methods for analyzing problems 
as well as design methods for 
problem solving 

PA 661 Problems of 
Metropolitan Areas 

Analysis of the problems of gov- 
ernment and administration aris- 
ing from the population patterns 
and physical and social structures 
of contemporary metropolitan 
communities. 

PA 662 Recruitment and 
Retention of Health Care 
Professionals 

Theories, techniques and meth- 
ods related to recruiting and re- 
taining professional health care 
employees, especially in situa- 
tions of labor shortages. 

PA 664 Survey of Medical 
Group Management 

Business management in the phy- 
sicians' group practice arena. Be- 
ginning with the start-up phase, 
complete coverage of the process. 
Current as well as future direc- 
tions in physician group manage- 
ment and ways to enhance its 
profitability. 

PA 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

PA 680 Seminar in Public 
Administration 

Exact material to be covered will 
be announced. 

PA 681 Long-Term Health 
Care Internship I 

Prerequisites: PA 641, PA 646. 



First of two state-required intern- 
ships required to be eligible to 
take the State of Connecticut li- 
censing examination in long-term 
care administration. Course is 
composed of a 450-hour nursing 
home internship. 

PA 682 Long-Term Health 
Care Internship II 

A continuation of Long-Term 
Health Care Internship I. 

PA 690 Research Seminar 

Recommended prerequisite: PA 
6n. Requirements include a ma- 
jor independent research study 
and participation in an integra- 
tive seminar on research and its 
uses in public administration. 

PA 691 Research Project 

Prerequisites: 15 graduate hours 
and permission of the public ad- 
ministration graduate program 
coordinator. Independent study 
for advanced graduate students 
on selected problems in public 
administration. May be taken 
more than once. 

PA 692 Readings in Public 
Administration 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or 
permission of the instructor. 

PA 693 Public 
Administration Internship 

Prerequisites: 15 graduate hours 
and permission of the public ad- 
ministration graduate program 
coordinator. A supervised work 
experience in a cooperating pub- 
lic service agency. Students must 
be available for at least one day 
per week. 

PA 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

PA 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

PA 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 



Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

PA 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Physics 



PH 613 Radioactivity and 
Radiation in the 
Environment 

Prerequisites: EN 600 and CH 
601, or permission of instructor. 
Basic principles of nuclear struc- 
ture and radioactivity; the inter- 
action of radiation with matter 
and biological effects of radiation; 
natural and man-made sources of 
radiation in the environment. The 
second half of the course will fo- 
cus on long-term environmental 
effects of radiation accidents (e.g., 
Chernobyl and others) and the 
problems of nuclear waste dis- 
posal, plutonium inventories 
from nuclear weapons, natural 
radon in buildings and similar 
concerns. (See also EN 613.) 

PH 670 Selected Topics- 
Physics 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
instructor. A study of selected 
topics of particular interest to stu- 
dents and instructor. Course may 
be taken more than once. 



Philosophy 



PL 601 Business Ethics 

Problems include the nature of 
the corporation, the values of 
business activity, corporate social 
responsibility, the proper rela- 
tionship between the corporation 
and government, employee rights 
and related matters. Problems are 
analyzed using the most impor- 
tant current theories of social and 
economic justice. 



168 



PL 614 Philosophy of 
Education 

A critical analysis of education in 
contemporary society as reflected 
in the thinking of modern and 
early philosophers. (See also ED 
614.) 



Political Science 

PS 601 Constitutional Law 

A study of the judicial process 
and its relation to the Constitu- 
tion and the political system in 
the United States. Examines the 
role of the Supreme Court in 
shaping judicial review, federal- 
ism, civil rights and liberties, 
equal protection and due process. 

PS 602 Civil Liberties and 
Rights 

An analysis of civil liberties, civil 
rights, due process and equal pro- 
tection of the law. An examination 
of the role of the public official in 
the protection, denial or abridg- 
ment of the constitutional and le- 
gal rights of individuals. 

PS 603 International Law 

A study of the role of international 
law in the modern state system 
with particular reference to indi- 
viduals; territorial jurisdiction; 
law of the sea, air and space; and 
the development of law through 
international organizations. 

PS 604 Human Rights and 
the Law 

An examination of the devel- 
opment of the international and 
national laws establishing human 
rights, the laws of war, war/crim- 
inality, crimes against humanity 
and the application of the univer- 
sal declaration of human rights, 
of the Helsinki Accords, and of 
the concept of the individual as 
the basis of law. 

PS 605 Criminal Law 

Scope, purpose, definition and 
classification of criminal law. Of- 



fense against the person; habita- 
tion and occupancy offenses 
against property and other offens- 
es. Special defenses. Emphasis on 
the Connecticut penal code. 

PS 606 Advanced 
International Relations 

Basic elements of international life 
relevant to the growth of a stable 
and peaceful global political- 
economic system. Includes: pow- 
er, diplomacy, law, trade, aid, 
monetary affairs, multinational 
corporations and differing geo- 
graphical and cultural characteris- 
tics. 

PS 608 The Legislative 
Process 

An analysis of the legislative pro- 
cess in the American political sys- 
tem. Stress on legislative politics 
in state and local government. 
Includes: legislative functions, se- 
lection and recruitment of legisla- 
tive candidates, legislative role 
orientahons, the legislative social- 
ization process, the committee 
system, the legislators and their 
constituencies, legislative lobby- 
ists, legislative decision making, 
legislative-executive relations 
and legislative organization and 
procedures. 

PS 610 Legal Methods I 

A study of procedure and process 
of the law as it applies in the 
American system and an intro- 
duction to legal research and 
writing. 

PS 612 Contracts, Torts and 
the Practice of Law 

An introduction to the most im- 
portant components of private 
law — contracts, torts and civil 
procedure and their application 
to business, government and in- 
dividuals. 

PS 615 Jurisprudence 

The general philosophical frame- 
work for the law. Includes the 
background and development of 
the common law, sources of the 



law and the court system. Special 
problems in Anglo-American ju- 
risprudence are reviewed. 

PS 616 Urban Government 

An examination of the urban po- 
litical system. Stress on the po- 
litical aspects of urban govern- 
ment structures. Includes: formal 
and informal decision making in 
urban government, community 
power structures, types of urban 
government structures, the poli- 
tics of intergovernmental rela- 
tions and the politics of servicing 
the urban environment (social 
services, planning agencies, edu- 
cation, housing, transportation, 
health, pollution control and ecol- 
ogy, revenue sharing, public safe- 
ty, neighborhood corporations, 
etc.). 

PS 617 Law, Science and 
Ethics 

The intersection of law, science 
and ethics in a variety of contexts, 
including experimentation with 
human subjects, psychosurgery, 
genetic engineering, organ trans- 
plants, abortion and the right to 
die. 

PS 619 Legal Protection of 
Computer Software 

Prerequisite: CS 602 or equiva- 
lent. The legal principles involved 
in the protection of proprietary 
computer software and hardware 
by means of patents, copyrights 
and trade secrets. Considers soft- 
ware licensing and employer-em- 
ployee relationships involving cre- 
ative work. (See also CS 619.) 

PS 625 Transnational Legal 
Structures 

An introduction to the basic struc- 
ture of legal systems in other 
countries, their relationship to 
Anglo-American law and tneir 
contextual development. Special 
topics include: legal status of for- 
eign and multinational corpora- 
tions, rights and responsibilities 
of aliens, protections for inves- 
tors, expropriation and proce- 
dural due process. 



Courses 169 



PS 626 Decision Making in 
the Political Process 

An in-depth study of decision 
making in the American system 
with special emphasis on the vari- 
ous types of mechanisms: execu- 
tive, legislative, judicial, bureau- 
cratic, organizational and mili- 
tary. The influence of intelligence, 
economic and psychological fac- 
tors and social pressure on deci- 
sions and decision makers will be 
examined. 

PS 628 Change and 
Government 

A study of the major processes of 
change and their consequences 
for the functioning of govern- 
ment. Concentrates on changes 
that may occur through violence, 
evolution or technology and 
which may alter the effective op- 
eration of government. 

PS 633 The Political Process 
and the Aged 

A study of the political process as 
it relates to the aged. Govern- 
mental decision making on feder- 
al, state and local levels including 
legislation and its implications. 

PS 635 Law and Public 
Health 

A course for the civil servant or 
health professional concerned 
with the laws relating to the pub- 
lic health at the federal, state and 
local level as well as the practical 
administration of those laws. 

PS 640 Law and Education 

An examination of the legal and 
educational issues arising from 
factors such as EEO, students' 
rights, student financing and the 
relationships between schools 
and government. 

PS 641 The Politics of the 
World Economy 

An examination of the global po- 
litico-economic system and the 
challenges facing world diplo- 
macy. Multinational corporations 
and political structures designed 



to coordinate global policies for 
the monetary and trade systems, 
international organizations and 
their impact on Third World de- 
velopment and problems facing 
industrialized nations. 

PS 645 Government and the 
Industrial Sector 

The various impacts of govern- 
ment regulation on the corporate 
sector and the major legal and 
regulatory requirements affecting 
business and industry. 

PS 655 Conflict Resolution 

Essential features and methods 
available within the legal system 
to resolve disputes, including the 
uses of law, equity, administrative 
agencies, bureaucracies, arbitra- 
tion, mediation, special commis- 
sions and private self-help. Ap- 
plicability of those methods to 
various types of disputes and the 
choice of law in instances when 
no single rule may govern in a 
federal system. 

PS 670 Selected Topics 

A study of items of special in- 
terest may include: First Amend- 
ment problems, energy and the 
law, law and the environment, 
labor legislation and the law, law 
and commercial paper and stock 
issues. May be taken more than 
once. 

PS 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

PS 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 



Quantitative 
Analysis 

QA 604 Probability and 
Statistics 

Statistical methods and theories 
used in solving business prob- 



lems. Topics include data analy- 
sis, discrete and continuous prob- 
ability distributions, statistical 
inference and estimation, regres- 
sion and correlation analysis, the 
analysis of variance, decision 
theory and nonparametric tests 
including chi-square. Students 
will use computers to conduct 
statistical tests using the informa- 
tion presented. 

QA 605 Advanced Statistics 

A continuation of QA 604. In- 
cludes: regression and correla- 
tion, multiple regression, analysis 
of variance, the general linear 
model and an introduction to 
time series analysis and forecast- 
ing techniques. 

QA 606 Advanced 
Management Science 

Prerequisites: IE 601, QA 604, QA 
605. An examination, from a man- 
agement viewpoint, of the scope 
of applicability of the methods 
and models developed in IE 601 
Introduction to Operations Re- 
search/Management Science, QA 
604 Probability and Statistics, and 
QA 605 Advanced Statistics. In- 
cludes: parametric programming 
and economic interpretation of 
the dual LP problem, marginal 
costs and revenues, shadow 
prices, opportunity costs, incre- 
mental costs, costs of deviation 
from optimal solution point(s) 
and location or construction of 
desirable alternate optimal solu- 
tions. 

QA 607 Forecasting 

Prerequisite: QA605 or permission 
of the instructor. A wide range of 
forecasting methods useful to stu- 
dents and practitioners of man- 
agement, economics and other dis- 
ciplines requiring forecasting. Fo- 
cus on quantitative techniques of 
forecasting; will include smooth- 
ing and decomposition ap- 
proaches, multiple regression and 
econometric models, and 
autoregressive/ moving average 
methods including generalized 
adaptive filtering and Box-Jenkins 
methodology. 



170 



QA 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. Courses may cover 
decision science methods such as 
experimental design, nonpara- 
metrics, data analysis with SPSS, 
Bayesian decision theory and 
simulation. May be taken more 
than once. 

QA 675 Computer-Aided 
Multivariate Analysis 

Prerequisite: QA 604 or equiv- 
alent. Summary, for students and 
researchers, of several widely 
used multivariate statistical 
analysis techniques and com- 
puter packages. Topics include 
the nature and concept of scien- 
tific problem solving, applied 
regression analysis and its limita- 
tions, multiple frequency analy- 
sis, profile analysis of repeated 
measures canonical correlation 
analysis, discriminant analysis, 
cluster analysis, principal compo- 
nents analysis and factor analysis. 

QA 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or 
permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under the 
supervision of an adviser. 

QA 695 Independent 
Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

QA 696 Independent 
Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

QA 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

QA 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Occupational Safety 
and Health 

SH 602 Safety Organization 
and Administration 

Intensive study of the occupa- 
tional safety and health field as it 
currently exists. History and 
growth of industrial safety. Moti- 
vational and psychological as- 
pects of accident prevention. Le- 
gal aspects of safety, including 
worker compensation and state 
and federal regulations. Engi- 
neering needs. Development of 
voluntary standard systems. Fire 
prevention, industrial hygiene 
and future directions. 

SH 605 Industrial Safety 
Engineering 

An analysis of the major physical 
hazards in industrial work and 
the attendant safety practices 
employed to eliminate the haz- 
ardous condition or minimize the 
likelihood and extent of injury. In- 
cludes the hazards associated 
with machinery, combustion, 
electricity, material handling and 
fire. 

SH 608 Industrial Hygiene 
Practices 

Prerequisite: introductory chem- 
istry. Recognition of the magni- 
tude and extent of the health haz- 
ards characteristic of industrial 
work. An evaluation of the dan- 
ger, the control of the hazard and 
the protection of the worker. 

SH 611 OSH Research 
Methods and Techniques 

The students and OSH faculty 
will meet once a week throughout 
the trimester. The student will se- 
lect a topic directly related to oc- 
cupational safety and health, con- 
duct a literature search, do a re- 
search project, and prepare and 
defend a mini thesis. 

SH 615 Toxicology 

Prerequisite: introductory chem- 
istry. Introduction to environ- 



mental and industrial toxicology; 
toxicologic evaluation; the mode 
of entry, absorption and distribu- 
tion of toxicants; the metabolism 
and excretion of toxic substances; 
interactions between substances 
in toxicology; toxicologic data 
extrapolation; particulates; sol- 
vents and metals; agricultural 
chemicals — insecticides and pes- 
ticides; toxicology of plastics; 
gases; food additives; plant and 
animal toxins; carcinogens, muta- 
gens and teratogens. (See also EN 
615.) 

SH 620 Occupational Safety 
and Health Law 

A survey of the major federal oc- 
cupational safety and health laws 
with an emphasis on the Oc- 
cupational Safety and Health Act 
of 1970 as well as state workers' 
compensation laws. Studies focus 
on the administration of the laws, 
their major provisions, the en- 
forcement process as well as the 
federal/state interrelationships in 
this milieu. 

SH 630 Product Safety and 
Liability 

An investigation into the legal 
pitfalls and the human concerns 
inherent in the marketing and 
consumption of goods: sellers re- 
sponsibility, product liability, in- 
surance, labeling requirements. 
The Consumer Product Safety Act 
and related acts, the proceclures 
for minimizing legal risk and 
maximizing human safety and 
health. 

SH 660 Industrial 
Ventilation 

A thorough study of industrial 
ventilation systems including the- 
ory of design, air pollution con- 
trol, life-cycle costs, automatic 
controls, instrumentation, rele- 
vant codes and standards, and the 
evaluation of system perfor- 
mance. 

SH 661 Microcomputers in 
Occupational Safety and 
Health 

Introductory course on using mi- 



crocomputers in occupational 
safety and health. Instruction in 
techniques used for data process- 
ing, statistical analysis, interfac- 
ing with instrumentation and 
linking with mini- and main- 
frame computers. 

SH 665 Industrial Hygiene 
Measurements 

Theory and practice of current 
methods and techniques applica- 
ble to industrial hygiene. Experi- 
ments in ventilation, nonionizing 
radiation, measurement of air- 
borne contaminants, noise and 
heat stress. 



SH 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



SH 667 Control of 
Occupational Health 
Hazards 

Advanced study of method- 
ologies used to control exposures 
to those workplace agents which 
cause illness and /or disease. Pri- ~ ; ~ 
mary focus on techniques used to ^OClOlOgy 
minimize employee exposures; 
full discussion of personal protec- 
tive devices. 



SH 694 OSH Internship II 

A continuation of Internship 1. 1- 
3 credits. 

SH 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 1-3 credits. 

SH 696 Independent 
Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 1-3 credits. 

SH 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 



SH 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

SH 690 Research Project I 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
instructor. Independent study 
under the supervision of an 
adviser. 1-3 credits. 

SH 691 Research Project II 

A continuation of Research 
Project I. 1-3 credits. 

SH 693 OSH Internship I 

Coordinated with local industry 
or governmental agencies. Prac- 
tical problems in occupational 
safety or industrial hygiene and 
approaches to solving these prob- 
lems under the supervision of a 
practicing professional. At the 
end of the project a report will be 
prepared by the student and will 
be presented to the OSH faculty 
for grade evaluation. 1-3 credits. 



SO 601 Minority Group 
Relations 

An interdisciplinary survey of 
minority groups in the United 
States with special reference to 
ethnic, religious and racial factors 
that influence interaction. 

SO 610 Urban Sociology 

Prerequisite: PA 604. The pro- 
blems of urban growth and devel- 
opment. Residential patterns to- 
gether with the physical develop- 
ment of cities and their 
redevelopment. An examination 
of the people and their relation- 
ships to the environment. 

SO 620 Sociology of 
Bureaucracy 

A study of some of the classic 
conceptualizations of bureau- 
cracy and their relevance to the 
structure and functioning of 
American economic and govern- 
mental institutions. Gives stu- 
dents informational and experi- 
ential resources with which they, 
as planners and managers, can 
improve their abilities to make 
effective policy decisions. 



Courses 171 

SO 641 Death and Suicide 

In-depth analysis of suicide. Tra- 
ditional theories of suicide are 
analyzed regarding the psycho- 
logical approach as well as the de- 
mographic and group analysis of 
sociology. The goal of the course 
is both academic and practical, 
stressing community application. 

SO 649 Seminar in Health 
and Social Policy 

Analysis of the legal, political, 
social, economic and organiza- 
tional factors in planning and 
providing health care services 
with emphasis on policy formula- 
tion and implementation. Current 
health policy issues. 

SO 651 Social Gerontology 

Basic introduction to the field of 
gerontology. Discusses the his- 
tory and definition of the field, 
the contributions of academic 
disciplines to the field, various 
perceptions of aging; explores the 
basic theories, problems and 
prospects of gerontology. 

SO 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

SO 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

SO 696 Independent 
Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

SO 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

SO 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



171 



Doctoral Program 
Course Descriptions 

EC 703 Forecasting and 
Econometrics 

Prerequisites: MG 701 and MG 
702. Contemporary use of ad- 
vanced forecasting and econo- 
metric techniques in modern 
corporations and in nonprofit/ 
public sector organizations. Com- 
puter-aided modeling will be 
stressed within the framework of 
corporate planning. 

EC 704 Public and Private 
Policy Interfaces 

Descriptions of the varied and 
complex interfaces and interde- 
pendence between public and 
private organizations. Roles of 
regulatory agencies and the re- 
sultant responses of regulated 
organizations. 

FI 701 Seminar in Financial 
Policy 

Review of contemporary thought 
relevant to financial policy for- 
mulation within organizations. 
Analysis of capital markets, regu- 
lation and resource availability in 
the context of contributors to 
overall corporate policy and stra- 
tegic decision making. 

IE 704 Seminar in 
Management and Control 
Systems 

Topical coverage of contempo- 
rary management information 
systems and their roles in corpo- 
rate planning and control func- 
tions. Resource control systems 
are reviewed in conjunction with 
budgeting, cost accounting, orga- 
nizational communication and 
managerial decision making. 

MG 701 and MG 702 
Research Design I and II 

Prerequisite: MG 701 for MG 702. 
These two courses are designed to 
provide students with basic train- 
ing in research. Participants will 
have ample opportunities to ex- 



amine relationships among ideas, 
question the basic assumptions, 
learn methodology and measure- 
ments of variables, test hypoth- 
eses and interpret the findings. 
Major focus is also on the applica- 
tion of the advanced statistics top- 
ics (including design of experi- 
ments, factor analysis and non- 
parametric analysis) to public and 
private management problems. 
Intensive training, guidance and 
experience in library research, as 
well as statistical computing by 
SPSS and other computer statisti- 
cal package programs, will be 
provided. 

MG 737 Seminar in 
Management 

Review of the state of the art of 
the management process. Topical 
coverage of contemporary man- 
agement theories, trends, devel- 
opments, successes and failures. 

MG 738 Policy and Strategic 
Decision Making 

Intensive review of policy for- 
mulation and strategic decision 
making in large and small organi- 
zaHons, with emphasis on private 
corporations. Interfaces with gov- 
ernment, special interest, labor 
and foreign organizations are in- 
corporated into the overall policy 
review process. 

MK 701 Seminar in Strategic 
Marketing 

Role of marketing and marketing 
research in the development of 
organizational policy and cor- 
porate decision making. 

P 719 Topics in Applied 
Behavioral Science 

Review of contemporary research 
relevant to the management pro- 
cess in organizations of all types. 
Topics include specific contribu- 
tions from behavioral science, or- 
ganizational development, indus- 
trial relations and group dynam- 
ics. 



MG 801 Dissertation I 

Prerequisite: successful com- 
pletion of the written and oral doc- 
toral comprehensive examina- 
tions. Periodic meetings and dis- 
cussions of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the preparation 
of the doctoral dissertation. 

MG 802 Dissertation II 

A continuation of Dissertation I. 

MG 803 Dissertation III 

A continuation of Dissertation II. 

MG 804 Dissertation IV 

A continuation of Dissertation III. 



BOARD, ADMINISTRATION 
AND FACULTY 

Board of Governors 



Henry E. Bartels, former president, MMRM Industries, subsidiary of Insilco Corporation 

David Beckerman, chairman and chief executive officer. Starter Sportswear, Inc. 

Samuel S. Bergami, Jr., president, AUnabal Incorporated 

Nan Birdwhistell, former first selectwoman. Town of Woodbridge 

Carroll W. Brewster, executive director. The Hole in the Wall Gang 

William L. Bucknall, Jr., senior vice president, human resources and organization. United 

Technologies Corporation 
James J. Cullen, president and chief executive officer. Hospital of Saint Raphael 
Lawrence J. DeNardis, Ph.D., president, University of New Haven 
Charlotte G. Denenberg, vice president-network technology and chief technology officer. 

Southern New England Telephone 
Isabella Dodds, co-chair. Friends of the UNH Library 
Orest T. Dubno, chief financial officer. Lex Atlantic Corporation 
Robert L. Fiscus, president and chief financial officer. United lUuminating 
Murray A. Gerber, vice chairman; president. Prototype and Plastic Mold Company, Inc. 
Jean M. Handley, principal, Handley Consulting 

Terry M. Holcombe, vice-president for development and alumni affairs, Yale University 
Barbara P. Johnson, senior vice president. People's Bank 

Henry C. Lee, Ph.D., director. Forensic Science Laboratory, State of Connecticut 
Mark S. Levy, president, Fire-Lite Alarms, Inc., Notifier and Notifier Europe 
Alexander W. Nicholson, Jr., president and chief executive officer. The Nicholson Group 
Charles E. Pompea, president. Primary Steel Inc. 
M. Wallace Rubin, chairman. Wayside Furniture Shops, Inc. 
William J. Rush, publisher and chief executive office. New Haven Register 
Jay W. Ryerson, executive vice president and chief operating officer. Analysis & Technology, Inc. 
Francis A. Schneiders, former president, Enthone-OMI Inc. 
R.C. Taylor, III, president, Tay-Mac Corporation 
Harry J. Torrelo, president and chief operating officer. Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield 

of Connecticut 
Cheever Tyler, chairman; president. The Partnership for Connecticut Cities, Inc. 
Reuben Vine, president. Railroad Salvage Stores 
Wallack, Milton, D.D.S. 
Robert F. Wilson, former chairman of the board, Wallace International Silversmiths, Inc. 



274 

Corporate Secretary and General Counsel 

William C. Bruce, attorney at law 

Emeritus Board 

James Q. Bensen, retired Connecticut sales manager, Bethlehem Steel Corporation 

Roland M. Bixler, retired president and co-founder, J-B-T Instruments, Inc. 

Norman I. Botwinik, Botwinik Associates 

Joseph F. Duplinsky, honorary chairman of the board, AnthemBlue Cross Blue Shield of 

Connecticut 
John E. Echlin, Jr., retired account executive, Paine Webber 
John A. Frey, president, Hershey Metal Products, Inc. 
Robert M. Gordon, retired president, Raybestos-Manhattan, Inc. 
Robert J. Lyons, chairman of the board. The Bilco Company 
Flemming L, Norcott, Jr., associate justice of the Supreme Court of Connecticut 
Herbert H, Pearce, chairman of the board and chief executive officer, H. Pearce Company 
Fenmore R. Seton, retired president, Seton Name Plate Corporation 
George R. Tieman, attorney at law 



Representatives of the alumni/ae, full-time faculty and adjunct faculty serve two-year terms on the Board 
of Governors; representatives from undergraduate student government organizations and the Graduate 
Student Council serve one-year terms on the Board of Governors. 



Board, Administration, and Faculty 175 

Administration 
Office of the President 

Lawrence J. DeNardis, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., president 

Lorraine A. Guidone, assistant to the president and to the chairman of the board 

Lucy Wendland, executive secretary 

Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs 
and Provost 

James W. Uebelacker, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., vice president for academic affairs and provost 

Silvia L Hyde, executive secretary 

Brenda R. Williams, B.A., M.A.Ed., Ph.D., associate provost 

Ira H. Kleinfeld, B.S., M.S., Eng.Sc.D., assistant provost for external operations 

D.C. Reams, B.Ch.E., M.Eng., D.Eng., special assistant for institutional research 

Letitia H. Bingham, B.A., M.A., coordinator, graduate services and academic scheduling 



College of Arts & Sciences 

Nancy Carriuolo, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., dean 

Thomas L. Mentzer, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., associate dean 

Beverly A. Bentivegna, B.S., M.Ed., assistant dean for administrative affairs and chair. School of 

Hotel, Restaurant, Tourism and Dietetics Administration 

Nancy Ronne, assistant to the dean, student ombudsperson 

Paul Alpert, executive director, UNH art gallery 

Susan Cusano, executive secretary 

Michael J. Rossi, Ph.D., coordinator, master of science in cellular and molecular biology 

Robert J. Hoffnung, Ph.D., coordinator, master of arts in community psychology 

Louise M. Soares, Ph.D., director, education programs 

Roman N. Zajac, Ph.D., coordinator, master of science in environmental science 

Robert W. FitzGerald, Ph.D., director, human nutrition program 

Tara L'Heureux, Ph.D., coordinator, master of arts in industrial /organizational psychology 



Faculty of the College of Arts & Sciences 

Bell, Srilekha, Professor, English 

B.A., M.A., University of Madras, India; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Boardman, Susan, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.S., St. Lawrence University; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University 



176 

Carriuolo, Nancy, Professor, English 

B.A., M.S., State University of New York College at Brockport; Ph.D., State University of New 

York at Buffalo 

Carriuolo, Ralf E., Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.A., Yale University; M.M., Hartt School of Music; Ph.D., Wesleyan University 

Celotto, Albert, Assistant Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.M., Western Connecticut State College; M.M., Indiana University School of Music 

Chepaitis, Joseph B., Professor, History 

A.B., Loyola College; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 

Davis, R. Laurence, Professor, Earth and Environmental Science 

A.B., A.M., Washington University; Ph.D., University of Rochester 

Davis, Wesley J., Lecturer, English 

B.A., M.A., Southern Connecticut State University 

DeNardis, Lawrence J., Professor, Political Science 

B.S., Holy Cross CoUege; M. A., Ph.D., New York University 

Dinegar, Caroline A., Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Dull, James W ., Professor, Political Science 

B. A., Wilkes College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Farrell, Richard J., Lecturer, English 

B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.A., University of Virginia; M.Phil., Yale University 

Ferringer, Natalie J., Professor, Political Science 

B.S., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of \^ginia 

French, Bruce A., Professor, English 

A.B., University of Missouri; M.A., Western Reserve University; M.A., Middlebury College; 

M. A., Harvard University; Ph.D., New York University 

Glen, Robert A., Professor, History 

B.A., University of Washington; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

Gordon, Judith Bograd, Associate Professor, Sociology 

B.A., Brandeis University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Greene, Jeffrey, Associate Professor, English 

B. A., Goddard College; M.F.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Houston 

Guido, Alice A., Lecturer, English 

A.B., Mount Holyoke College; M.A.L.S., Wesleyan University 

Hoffnung, Robert J., Professor, Psychology 

A.B., Lafayette College; M. A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Hyman, Arnold, Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Brooklyn College; M.S., City College of New York; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Jafarian, AH A., Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., Tehran University; M.S., Pahlavi University; Ph.D., University of Toronto 

Jayaswal, Shakuntala, Associate Professor, English 

B. A., Ripon College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Jensen, Heather, Instructor, Dental Hygiene 

A.S., Springfield Technical Community CoUege, B.S., University of New Haven 

Kaloyanides, Michael G., Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.A., Ph.D., Wesleyan University 

Kane, Susan P., Assistant Professor, Dental Hygiene 

B. A., University of Connecticut; M.S., Boston University Goldman School of Graduate Dentistry 

Katsaros, Thomas, Professor, History 

B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 



Board, Administration, and Faculty 177 

L'Heureux, Tara, Assistant Professor, Psychology 

B.A., State University of New York College at Plattsburgh; M.A., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Mager, Guillermo E., Assistant Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.S., M.A., New York University 

Maloney, Jeanne, Associate Professor, Dental Hygiene 

G.D.H., B.S., University of Minnesota; M.S., University of Missouri at Kansas City 

Marks, Joel, Professor, Philosophy 

B.A., Cornell University; Ph.D., University of Cormecticut 

Marx, Paul, Professor, English 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.F.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., New York University 

Mautner, Raeleen, Instructor, Education 

B.A., M.A., Southern Connecticut State College 

Mentzer, Thomas L., Professor, Psychology 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., Ph.D., Brown University 

Morris, Michael A., Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Boston College 

Morrison, Richard C, Professor, Physics 

A.B., Princeton University; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 

Osgood, David, Assistant Professor, Environmental Science 

B.S., University of North Carolina, Wilmington; M.S., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Palumbo, Sandy, Assistant Professor, Dental Hygiene 

B.S., University of Bridgeport; M.P.S., Quinnipiac College 

Pepin, Paulette L., Assistant Professor, Education 

B.A., Western Connecticut State University; M.A., Ph.D., Fordham University 

Rosenthal, Erik, Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., Queens College, City University of New York; M.S., State University of New York at 

Albany; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

Rossi, Michael J., Assistant Professor, Biology and Environmental Science 

B.S., Xavier University; Ph.D., University of Kentucky 

Sachdeva, Baldev K., Professor, Mathematics 

M.S., M.A., Delhi University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Sack, Allen L., Professor, [Management and] Sociology 

B. A., University of Notre Dame; M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Sandman, Joshua H., Professor, Political Science 

B. A., M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Sharma, Ramesh, Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Banaras Hindu University, India; Ph.D., University of Windsor 

Simerson, Gordon R., Associate Professor, Psychology 

B. A., University of Delaware; M. A., Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Sloane, David E. E., Professor, English 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University 

Smith, Donald M., Professor, English 

A.B., Guilford College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., New York University 

Scares, Louise M., Professor, Education 

B.A., M.A., Boston University; Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Somerville, Christy A., Visiting Assistant Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

A.A., Fullerton College; B.A., M.A., California State University, Long Beach 

Todd, Edmund N., Associate Professor, History 

B.A., M.A., University of Florida; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Tyndall, Bruce, Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., M.S., University of Iowa 



178 

Uebelacker, James W., Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., LeMoyne College; M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Vigue, Charles L., Professor, Biology and Environmental Science 

B.A., M.S., University of Maine; Ph.D., North Carolina State University 

Voegeli, Henry E., Professor, Biology and Environmental Science 

B. A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Rhode Island 

Wakin, Shirley, Professor, Mathematics and Education 

B. A., University of Bridgeport; M. A., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Whitley, W . Thurmon, Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., Stetson University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ph.D., Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute and State University 

Williams, Brenda R., Associate Professor, English 

B.A., Howard University; M.A.Ed., Ph.D., Washington University 

York, Michael W,, Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., University of Maryland 

Zajac, Roman N., Associate Professor, Biology and Environmental Science 

B.S., Tufts University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Zinser, Jerry T., Associate Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.F.A., University of Hartford; M.F.A., Rutgers University 

Faculty Professional Licensure and Accreditation 

Davis, R. Laurence, Professional Geologist, South Carolina, Kentucky; Certified Professional 

Geologist, American Institute of Professional Geologists; Certified Professional Hydrogeologist, 

American Institute of Hydrology; Certified, Wilderness First Aid 

Everhart, Deborah, Clinical Psychologist, Connecticut 

Hoffnung, Robert J., Clinical Psychologist, Connecticut 

Hyman, Arnold, Licensed Psychologist, Connecticut 

Jensen, Heather, Registered Dental Hygienist, Connecticut, Massachusetts 

Kane, Susan P., Registered Dental Hygienist, Connecticut, Massachusetts 

Maloney, Jeanne, Registered Dental Hygienist, Connecticut 

Palumbo, Sandra, Registered Dental Hygienist, Connecticut 

York, Michael W., Clinical Psychologist, Connecticut 



Practitioners-in-Residence 

Abell, Norman, Biology 

B.S., Villanova University; D.P.M., Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine 

Bush, James, Biology 

M.S., Rutgers University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Liu, Ming-Chung, Mathematics 

B.S., Fu-Jen Catholic University, Taiwan; M.S., University of South Carolina; Ph.D., University of 

Georgia 

Prisloe, Michael P., Jr., Biology and Environmental Science 

B.A., Colby College; M.S., University of New Haven 



Board, Administration, and Faculty 179 

School of Hotel, Restaurant, Tourism & Dietetics Administration 

Beverly A. Bentivegna, B.S., M.Ed., assistant dean for administrative affairs of the College of 

Arts and Sciences and chair of the School of Hotel, Restaurant, Tourism and Dietetics 

Administration 

Marie Sacco, executive secretary 

Sherie Brezina, M.A., coordinator, master of science in hospitality and tourism 

Faculty of the School of HRTDA 

Bentivegna, Beverly A., Associate Professor, Dietetics 

B.S., M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University; R.D., Shadyside Hospital 

Brezina, Sherie, Assistant Professor, Tourism and Travel Administration 

B.A., M.A., University of Florida 

Chavent, Georgia, Assistant Professor, Dietetics 

B.S., University of New Hampshire; M.S., Columbia University; R.D., Medical College of 

Virginia 

Cryder, Victoria, Instructor, Tourism and Travel Administration 

B.S., University of New Haven; M.S., Southern Connecticut State University 

Rowland, Patrick B., Instructor, Hotel and Restaurant Management 

A.S., Culinary institute of America; B.S. University of New Haven; M.S., University of New 

Haven; CPA 

Vlisides, Constantine E., Associate Professor, Hotel and Restaurant Management 

B.S., Eastern Michigan University; M.A., University of Houston-Clear Lake; Ph.D., University of 

North Texas 



Faculty Professional Licensure and Accreditation 

Bentivegna, Beverly A., Registered Dietitian, American Dietetic Association 

Chavent, Georgia, Registered Dietitian, American Dietetic Association 

Bowman, Earl, Certified Hospitality Educator, Educational Institute of the American Hotel and 

Motel Association 

Rowland, Patrick B., Certified Public Accountant 



Practitioners-in-Residence 

Bowman, Earl, Hotel and Restaurant Management 

B.S., Northeastern University; M.S., Rochester Institute of Technology 

Sluder, LeRoy, Hotel and Restaurant Management 

B. A., University of Colorado; M.B.A., Uruversity of New Haven 



180 

School of Business 

Linda R. Martin, B.A., Ph.D., dean 

Zeljan E. Suster, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., associate dean 

Pauline Hill, executive secretary 

Omid Nodoushani, Ph.D., director, M.B.A. program 

Robert G. McDonald, M.B.A., CMA, CIA, CFA, CPA, coordinator, master of science in 

accounting 

Robert Rainish, Ph.D., coordinator, master of science in finance and financial services 

Charles N. Coleman, M.P.A., coordinator, master of science in health care administration and 

master of public administration (M.P.A.) programs 

Joseph A. Parker, Ph.D., coordinator, master of science in industrial relations 

Robert E. Wnek, J.D., LL.M., CPA, coordinator, master of science in taxation 

Omid Nodoushani, Ph.D., director, doctoral program (Sc.D. in management systems) 

James E. Shapiro, J.D., director, executive M.B.A. program 

Linda Carlone, B.S., recruiting coordinator, executive M.B.A. program 

Faculty of the School of Business 

Abel, Ivan, Assistant Professor, International Business and Marketing 

B.E.E., City College, New York; M.B.A., Bernard M. Baruch College; Ph.D., City University of 

New York 

Allen, Jerry L., Professor, Communication 

B.S., Southeast Missouri State College; M.S., Ph.D., Southern lUinois University at Carbondale 

Berman, Peter L, Professor, Finance 

A.B., Cornell University; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 

Burke, W. Vincent, Instructor, Communication 

B.S., M.Ed., Springfield College 

Chandra, Satish, Professor, Law and International Business 

B. A., University of Delhi; M.A., Delhi School of Economics; L.L.B., Lucknow Law School, India; 

L.L.M., J.S.D., Yale University 

Coleman, Charles N., Assistant Professor, Public Administration 

B.A., University of Maryland; M.P.A., West Virginia University 

Dichele, Ernest M., Professor, Tax Law 

B.S., University of New Haven; J.D., Boston College Law School; L.L.M., Boston University 

School of Law; CPA 

Downe, Edward, Associate Professor, Finance 

B. A., Bowling Green State University; M.A., Ph.D., New School for Social Research; A.P.C., New 

York University 

Falcone, Paul C., Instructor, Communication 

B.S., M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Finn, Dale Marie, Assistant Professor, Management 

B.A., M.Ed., University of Delaware; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Frank, Margaret L., Associate Professor, Public Administration 

B.S.W., University of Southern Maine; M.S., New Hampshire College; Ph.D., University of Texas 

Health Science Center at Houston 



Board, Administration, and Faculty 181 

Gersony, Neal, Assistant Professor, Management 

B.A., Columbia College; M.B.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Goulet, Laurel R., Assistant Professor, Management 

B.A., Rhode Island College; M.B. A., University of Rhode Island; Ph.D., University of Cormecticut 

Judd, Ben B., Professor, Marketing 

B. A., University of Texas; M.S., Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington 

Kaplan, Phillip, Professor, Economics 

B. A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 

Kublin, Michael, Professor, Marketing and International Business 

B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., Indiana University; M.B.A., Pace University; Ph.D., New York 

University 

Machnik, Joseph A., Associate Professor, Management 

B.S., M.S., Long Island University; Ph.D., University of Utah 

Martin, Linda R., Professor, Management and Quantitative Analysis 

B.A., Regis College; Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

McDonald, Robert G., Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.S., City College, New York; M.B.A., New York University; CMA, CIA, CFA, CPA 

McLaughlin, Marilou, Professor, Communciation 

B.A., M.A., Villanova University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Mensz, Pawel, Associate Professor, Management and Quantitative Analysis 

B.S., M.E., M.S., Warsaw Politechnic; Ph.D., Systems Research Institute of the Polish Academv of 

Sciences 

Morris, David J., Jr., Professor, Marketing 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Nadim, Abbas, Professor, Management 

B.A., Abadan Institute of Technology, Iran; M.B.A., University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D., 

University of Pennsylvania 

Neal, Judith A., Associate Professor, Management 

B.S., Quinnipiac College; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

Nodoushani, Omid, Associate Professor, Management 

B. A., National University of Iran; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

O'Connor, Matthew L., Assistant Professor, Finance 

B.A., University of Connecticut; M.B.A., University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Pan, William, Professor, Management and Quantitative Analysis 

B.S., National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan; M.B.A., Auburn University; Ph.D., Columbia 

University 

Parker, Joseph A., Professor, Economics 

B.A., Lehigh University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 

Phelan, John J., Associate Professor, Economics 

B.S., M.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., George Washington University 

Prasad, Anshuman, Assistant Professor, Management 

B. A., University of Delhi; M.B. A., University of Jamshedpur; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Pushner, George M., Assistant Professor, Finance 

A.B., M.P.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., Columbia Uruversity, CFP 

Rainish, Robert, Professor, Finance 

B.A., City College, New York; M.B.A., Bernard M. Baruch College; Ph.D., City University of 

New York 

Raucher, Steven A., Professor, Communication 

B. A., Queens College; M.S., Brooklyn College; Ph.D., Wayne State University; J.D., Bridgeport 

School of Law at Quinnipiac College 



182 

Rolleri, Michael, Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.S., University of Bridgeport; M.B.A., University of Connecticut; CPA 

Sack, Allen L., Professor, Management [and Sociology] 

B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Santomier, James, Visiting Professor, Management 

B. A., M. A., Montclair State University; Ph.D., University of Utah 

Shapiro, Steven J., Associate Professor, Economics and Finance 

B. A., University of Virginia; M. A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 

Small, Michael, Assistant Professor, Management 

B.A. University of the West Indies; M.B.A., Howard University; D.B.A., Cleveland 

State University 

Smith, Donald C, Professor, Communication 

B.A., Southern Connecticut State University; M.S., Emerson College; Ph.D., University of 

Massachusetts at Amherst 

Suster, Zeljan E., Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Belgrade, Yugoslavia 

Torello, Robert J., Assistant Professor, Management and Quantitative Analysis 

B. A., University of Connecticut; M.S., Southern Connecticut State University; M.B.A., University 

of New Haven 

Werblow, Jack, Professor, Public Administration 

B. A., Cornell University; M.B. A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Wnek, Robert E., Professor, Tax Law, Accounting and Business Law 

B.S.B. A., Villanova University; J.D., Delaware Law School of Widener University; LL.M., Boston 

University School of Law; CPA 

Woodruff, Martha, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.S., M.A., Murray State University; M.S., University of New Haven; Ed.D., University of 

Bridgeport 

Faculty Professional Licensure and Accreditation 

Dichele, Ernest M., Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut, Massachusetts; Attorney at Law, 

Connecticut, Massachusetts 

McDonald, Robert G., Certified Public Accountant, New York; CMA; CIA; CFA 

Parker, Joseph A., Accredited Personnel Specialist; National Panel Member, American 

Arbitration Association; Neutral Panel Member, State of Connecticut Board of Arbitration and 

Mediation 

Pushner, George M., Certified Financial Planner 

Rolleri, Michael, Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 

Wnek, Robert E., Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut; Member of the Bar, Connecticut, 

Pennsylvania 

Practitioners-in-Residence 

Coviello, Salvatore C, Accounting 

B.S., University of Bridgeport; M.S., University of Hartford; CPA 

Dudley-Smith, Clotilde, Public Administration 

B.S., University of Bridgeport; M.PA., University of New Haven 

Sandel, Susan, Public Administration 

B.A., Barnard College, Columbia University; M.A., Goddard College; Ph.D., Union Graduate 

School 



Board, Administration, and Faculty 183 



School of Engineering & Applied Science 

M. Jerry Kenig, B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., M.A., Ph.D., dear\ 
John Sarris, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., associate dean 
Matthew S. Sanders, Ph.D., special assistant to the dean 
Lucille P. Lamberti, executive secretary 

Roger G. Frey, Ph.D., J.D., coordinator, master of science in computer and information science 

Bouzid Aliane, Ph.D., coordinator, master of science in electrical engineering 

David J. Wall, Ph.D., coordinator, master of science in environmental engineering 

M. Ali Montazer, Ph.D., coordinator, master of science in industrial engineering and master of 

science in operations research 

Konstantine C. Lambrakis^ Ph.D., coordinator, master of science in mechanical engineering 



Faculty of the School of Engineering & Applied Science 

Adams, William R., Associate Professor, Computer Science 

B.S.E.E., M.S., University of New Haven; Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Aliane, Bouzid, Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S.E.E., Ecole Polytechnique d'Alger; M.S.E.E., Ph.D., Polytechnic Institute of New York 

Barratt, Carl, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.Sc, University of Bristol, England; Ph.D., University of Cambridge, England 

Bogan, Samuel D., Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Boston University 

Broderick, Gregory P., Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Northeastern University; Ph.D., University of Texas 

Chandra, Barun, Assistant Professor, Computer and Information Science 

B.S., St. Stephen's CoUege; M.S., Colorado State University; M.S., University of Rochester; Ph.D., 

University of Chicago 

Collura, Michael A., Professor, Chemical Engineering 

B.S., Lafayette CoUege; M.S., Ph.D., Lehigh University 

Desio, Peter J., Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Boston College; Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 

Eggert, David, Assistant Professor, Computer and Information Science 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of South Florida 

Faigel, Oleg, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Moscow Polytechnic Institute 

Fergany, Tahany, Assistant Professor, Computer Science 

B.S.E.E., Cairo University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Fischer, Alice, Professor, Computer Science 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Fish, Andrew J., Jr., Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S.E.E., Worcester Polytechnic Institute; M.S., University of Iowa; M.S., St. Mary's University; 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Frey, Roger G., Professor, Computer Science 

B. A., Yale College; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University; J.D., Yale Law School 



184 

Golbazi, AH M., Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S., Detroit Institute of Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Gow, Arthur S., Ill, Assistant Professor, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering 

B. A., Muhlenberg College; B.A., B.S., University of Rhode Island; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 

University 

Griscom, Priscilla, Senior Lecturer, Computer Science 

B.A., St. John's College; M.A., University of Rhode Island; M.S., University of New Haven 

Harding, W. David, Assistant Professor, Chemical Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Homing, Darrell W., Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S., South Dakota School of Mines; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Hosay, Norman, Associate Professor, Computer Science 

B.A., Wayne State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Karimi, Bijan, Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S., Aryamehr University of Technology, Iran; M.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State University 

Kenig, M. Jerry, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., Drexel University; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 

Kleinfeld, Ira H., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Eng.Sc.D., Columbia University 

Koutsospyros, Agamemnon D., Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering 

B.S., M.S., National Technical University, Athens; M.S., Polytechnic Institute of New York; Ph.D., 

Polytechnic University 

Lambrakis, Konstantine C, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., M.S.M.E., University of Bridgeport; Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Lanius, Ross M., Jr., Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering 

B.S.C.E., University of Delaware; M.S., University of New Haven; M.S.C.E., University of 

Connecticut 

Montazer, M. All, Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo 

Nocito-Gobel, Jean, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering 

B.S., Manhattan College; M.S., Ohio State University; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

O'Keefe, Daniel C, Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.E.E., City University of New York; M.S.E.E., Carnegie-Mellon University; Ph.D., Worcester 

Polytechnic Institute 

Okrent, Howard, Associate Professor, Computer Science 

B.Sc, University of California, Los Angeles; S.M., Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Orabi, Ismail, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Helwan University, Egypt; M.S., State University of New York at Buffalo; Ph.D., Clarkson 

University 

Ross, Stephen M., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E., New York University; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 

Saleeby, B. Badri, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., Cooper Union; M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Saliby, Michael J., Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Union College; Ph.D., State University of New York at Binghamton 

Sanders, Matthew S., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Indiana State University; Ph.D., Texas Tech Uruversity 

Sarris, John, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.A., Hamilton College; M.S., Ph.D., Tufts University 

Sommers, Alexis N., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.M.E., Cornell University; M.S., Rutgers University; Ph.D., Purdue University 



Board, Administration, and Faculty 185 

Sonderegger, Elaine L., Lecturer, Computer Science 

B.S., M.S., E.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Stanley, Richard M., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E.S., Johns Hopkins University; M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

Surti, Kantilal K., Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.E., University of Gujarat, India; M.E.E., University of Delaware; Ph.D., University of 

Connecticut 

Wall, David J., Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering 

B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Wentworth, Ronald N., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S.M.E., Northeastern University; M.S.I.E., University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., Purdue 

University 

Wheeler, George L., Jacob Finley Buckman Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering 

B. A., Catholic University of America; Ph.D., University of Maryland 

Wolfe, F. Andrew, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering 

A. Eng., Vermont Technical College; B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 



Faculty Professional Licensure and Accreditation 

Broderick, Gregory P., EFT, Massachusetts 

Collura, Michael, Professional Engineer, Pennsylvania 

Faigel, Oleg, Professional Engineer, Connecticut 

Harding, W. David, Professional Engineer, Indiana 

Kenig, M. Jerry, Professional Engineer, Pennsylvania, Michigan 

Lanius, Ross M., Jr., Professional Engineer, Connecticut, Massachusetts 

Surti, Kantilal K., Chartered Engineer, United Kingdom 

Wall, David J., Professional Engineer, Connecticut, Pennsylvania 

Wolfe, F. Andrew, Professional Engineer, Connecticut 



Practitioners-in-Residence 

Balba, Hamdy, Chemistry and Fire Science 

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

Schwartz, Pauline M., Chemistry and Chemical Engineering 

Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Pharmacologist, Veterans Administration Medical Center; Research Scientist, Department of 

Dermatology, Yale University School of Medicine 



School of Public Safety & Professional Studies 

Thomas A. Johnson, B.S., M.S., D.Crim., dean 
Sandra Villano, executive secretary 

William M. Norton, Ph.D., J.D., coordinator, master of science in criminal justice 



186 

Robert G. Sawyer, III, M.S., director, master of science in fire science 

Howard A. Harris, Ph.D., J.D., director, master of science in forensic science 

Brad T. Garber, Ph.D., coordinator, master of science in occupational safety and health 

management and master of science in industrial hygiene 

David P. Hunter, M.P.A., director, aviation 

Caroline A. Dinegar, Ph.D., director, Institute of Law and Public Affairs 

Faculty of the School of Public Safety & Professional Studies 

Cohen, Howard J., Associate Professor, Occupational Safety and Health 

B. A., Boston University; M.P.H., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Gaboury, Mario T., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., University of Connecticut; M.A., University of Maryland; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 

University; J.D., Georgetown University Law Center 

Garber, Brad T., Professor, Occupational Safety and Health 

B.S., M.S., Drexel University; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

Harris, Howard A., Associate Professor, Forensic Science 

A.B., Western Reserve University; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University; J.D., St. Louis University Law 

School 

Hunter, David P., Associate Professor, Aviation Management 

B.S., Wagner College; M.P.A., University of New Haven 

Iliescu, Sorin, Assistant Professor, Fire Science 

B.S.M.E., University of Bucharest, Romania; M.S., University of New Haven 

Johnson, Thomas A., Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.S., M.S., Michigan State University; D.Crim., University of California, Berkeley 

Maxwell, David A., Professor, Criminal Justice 

M. A., John Jay College of Criminal Justice; B.B.A., J.D., University of Miami 

Miller, Marilyn, Instructor, Forensic Science 

B.A., Florida Southern College; M.S. University of Pittsburgh 

Monahan, Lynn, Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

B. A., McGill University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oregon 

Norton, William M., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.S., Louisiana State University; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University; J.D., University of 

Connecticut School of Law 

O'Connor, Martin J., Associate Professor, Fire Science 

B. A., University of New Haven; J.D., University of Connecticut School of Law 

Parker, L. Craig, Jr., Professor, Criminal Justice 

A.B., Bates College; M.Ed., Springfield College; Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo 

Robin, Gerald D., Professor, Criminal Justice 

B. A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Sawyer, Robert G., Ill, Associate Professor, Fire Science 

B.S., M.S., University of New Haven 

Shain, Ralph, Visiting Professor, Occupational Safety and Health 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Hebrew University, Israel 

Vieira, Frank, Professor, Professional Studies 

B.S., Quinnipiac College; M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 



Board, Administration, and Faculty 187 

Faculty Professional Licensure and Accreditation 

Cohen, Howard J., Certified in the Comprehensive Practice of Industrial Hygiene 
Gaboury, Mario T., Attorney at Law, Connecticut; Connecticut Bar Association 
Garber, Brad T., Certified in General Toxicology, Certified in the Comprehensive Practice of 
Industrial Hygiene, Certified Safety Professional 

Hunter, David P., AirUne Transport Rated Pilot, Certified Flight Instructor, Certified Ground 
Instructor 

Krause, Leonard A., Occupational Safety and Health 

Certified in the Comprehensive Practice of Industrial Hygiene, Certified Safety Professional 
Maxwell, David A., Certified Protection Professional 
Monahan, Lynn, Licensed Psychologist, Connecticut, Massachusetts 

Norton, William M., Attorney at Law, Connecticut, Georgia; American Bar Association, Con- 
necticut Bar Association 

Parker, L. Craig, Jr., Consulting Psychologist, Wisconsin; Certified Psychologist, Province of 
Alberta, Canada 

Sawyer, Robert G., Ill, Certified Fire Protection Specialist; Associate in Underwriting, Insurance 
Institute of America 
Tsolis, Ronald, Airline Transport Rated Pilot; Certified Flight Instructor, FAA Line-Check Airman 



Practitioners-in-Residence 

Balba, Hamdy, Chemistry and Fire Science 

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

Carbone, William H., Criminal Justice 

B. A., Providence College; M.P. A., University of New Haven 

Director, Office of Alternative Sanctions Judicial Branch, State of Connecticut 

Cioffi, Nicholas A., Criminal Justice 

B.S., St. Michael's CoUege; J.D., University of Connecticut School of Law 

Director, Center for Judicial Technology, Information Management and Public Policy 

Haskins, Mark B., Occupational Safety and Health 

B.S., State University CoUege at Brockport; M.S., University of New Haven 

Manager, Safety and Health, Pfizer Groton Production Division 

Krause, Leonard A., Occupational Safety and Health 

Sc.D., University of Cincinnati 

Director, Environmental Hygiene and Toxicology, Olin Corporation 

Lawlor, Michael P., Criminal Justice 

M.A., University of London, England; J.D., George Washington University National Law Center 

Lee, Henry C, Forensic Science 

Ph.D., New York University 

Director, Forensic Science Laboratory, State of Connecticut 

Norcott, Flemming L., Jr., Criminal Justice 

B.A., Columbia CoUege; LL.B., Columbia Law School 

Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Cormecticut; Connecticut Bar Association; National Bar 

Association 

Tsolis, Ronald, Aviation 

B.S., University of New Haven 

Director, Flight Operations 



188 



Distinguished Special Lecturers 

Anderson, Michael R., Center for Judicial Technology, hiformation Management & Public Policy 

B.S., Weber State University 

Special Agent/Computer Specialist, Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation Division 

Kohler, Richard E., Center for Judicial Technology, Information Management & Public Policy 

B.A., San Jose State CoUege; M.A., Catholic University of America 

Private Investigator /Consultant/ Expert Witness 

Kolodney, Steve E., Center for Judicial Technology, Information Management & Public Policy 

B.S., New York University; M.B.A., University of California, Berkeley 

Director, Office of Information Technology and Program Budget Manager, Office of State Audits 

and Evaluations, California Department of Finance 

Perlee, Lorah, Forensic Science 

B.S., Cornell University; M.S., John Jay CoUege of Criminal Justice; Ph.D., New York Medical 

College, Principal Investigator, Lifecodes Corporation 



The Graduate School 

Office of the Dean 

Jerry L. Allen, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., dean of graduate studies & professional development 
Letitia H. Bingham, B.A., M.A., coordinator, graduate services & academic scheduling 
Jane Joseph, executive secretary 



Student Records 



Joseph Macionus, B.S., M.P.A., university registrar 

Nancy A. Carroll, B.S., M.S., associate registrar 

Virginia D. Klump, registrar for graduate records 

Alice R. Perrelli, administrative secretary for graduate records 

Linda Marino, graduate student records /information 



The Library 

Hanko H. Dobi, university librarian, B.A., M.L.S. 

Xaio Jun Cheng, head of circulation, B. A., M.L.S. 

Paula Pini, head of reference, B.S., M.L.S. 

Marion Hamilton Sachdeva, head of technical services, B.A., M.S.L.S. 

Diane Stackpole, reference librarian, B.A., M.A.L.S., M.L.S. 

Denise Golde, executive secretary 



Board, Administration, and Faculty 189 

UNH — Southeastern Connecticut 

Jerry C. Lamb, Ph.D., campus dean 

Martha M. Fox, B.A., associate director 

Oliver H. Porter, B.S., M.A., M.S., graduate coordinator 

Sandra Ash, administrative assistant 



Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs and 
Athletics 

William M. Leete, B.S., M.Ed., vice president for student affairs and athletics 
Ann Massini, executive secretary 

Rebecca D. Johnson, B.A., M.A., associate dean and director, residential life 
Steven T. Briggs, B. A., M.Ed., dean of admissions 
Deborah Chin, B.S.E., M.S., athletic director 
Henry A. Starkel, chief of campus police 



Graduate Admissions 



Joseph F. Spellman, B.S., M.A., director of graduate admissions 

Doreen J. Kasarda, administrative secretary 

Francine Burrows, admissions information 

Karen Cifaldi, student admissions 

Sybil J. Merritt, international student adnussions 



Financial Aid 

Jane C. Sangeloty, B.A., director 

Karen Flynn, B.A., M.A., assistant director 

Robin D'Errico, A.S., counselor 

Vanessa Ort, B.S., counselor 

Geraldine Flanders, administrative secretary 



190 

Undergraduate Admissions 

Midge Bumette, B.S., M.S., director of international admissions 
Darcy A. Stevens, B.S., director of part-time admissions 
David Beaton, B.S., assistant director of admissions 
Tony Carberry, B.A., assistant director of admissions 
Tyrone Black, B.A., admissions counselor 
Sheila Whitington, B.S., admissions counselor 



Office of the Vice President for Finance and 
Administration 

Duncan P. Gifford, B.S., M.B.A., CPA, vice president for finance and administration, secretary to 

the university 

Elsie Calandro, executive secretary 

Diane Devine, B.S., M.B.A., CPA, controller 

David C. Hennessey, A.B., M.B. A., director of human resources 

Justin T. McManus, B.S., director of facilities 

Frances A. MacMillan, bursar 



Office of the Vice President for University 
Advancement 

Donald J. Ibsen, B.S., M.B.A., vice president for university advancement 

Cynthia E. Avery, B.A., director of marketing and public relations 

Patricia J. Rooney, R.S.M., B.S., M.A., director of development 

Virginia D. Zawoy, B.A., associate director of corporate and foundation relations 

Bruce Maccabe, B.S., director of grants, research and sponsored programs 

Matthew S. Sanders, Ph.D., grants liaison 

Deborah J. Van Lenten, B.A., M.S., director of alumni relations 

William S. DeMayo, B.S., M.B.A., C.P.A., planned giving officer 

Jacqueline Koral, B.A., M.A., capital campaign director 

Department of Information Services 

William R. Adams, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., chief information officer 
William McLaughlin, B.Mus., M.S., director of computing services 
James K. Trella, B.S., M.S., director of technical support 
Johann Stanton, senior administrative assistant 



Board, Administration, and Faculty 191 

Departments and Services for Students 

Audiovisual Services: Paul Falcone, B.S., M.B.A., coordinator 

Business Office: Frances A. MacMillan, bursar 

Campus Center & Student Activities: Laura Hurley, B.S., M.S., director 

Career Development/Cooperative Education: Pamela Sommers, B.S., M.A., Ed.D., director 

Center for Learning Resources: Loretta K. Smith, B.A., M.A., director 

Counseling Center: Deborah Everhart, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., director 

Disability Accommodation Services: Linda Copney-Okeke, B.S., director 

Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action: P. Penny Pecka, B.S., equal opportunity /affirmative 

action officer 

Health Services: Paula Cappuccia, R.N., director 

International Student Services: Lisa Carraretto, B.A., M.S., director 

Library: Hanko Dobi, B.A., M.L.S., director 

Multicultural Affairs: Johnnie M. Fryer, B.A., M.A., M.S., director 

Residential Life: Rebecca D. Johnson, B.A., M.A., associate dean and director 

Patricia S. Christiano, assistant director 
Veterans' Affairs Officer: Joseph Macionus, university registrar 
WNHU Radio Station: W. Vincent Burke, B.S., M.Ed., general manager 



392 



INDEX 



Academic advising 29 

Academic calendar 7 

Academic honesty and ethics .... 23 

Academic probation 25 

Academic programs 9, 45 

Academic publications 38 

Academic schools 15 

Academic services 35 

Academic standards 24 

Access to academic records 23 

Accounting 45, 107 

Certificate 107 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 
program 49 

M.S. degree program 45 

Specializations 46 

Accounting and taxation course 

descriptions (A) 120 

Accounting certificate 107 

Accreditation 14 

Administration 

Concentration in fire science 

program 81 

Administration, board of governors 

and faculty 173 

Admission 18 

Admission categories 19 

Admission, international 

students 20 

Admission procedure 18 

Advanced Applications 

Concentration in computer 
and information science 

program 63 

Advanced investigation 

Concentration in forensic science 

program 83 

Advanced programs in professional 

education 68 

Advising 29 

Affirmative action 2 

Aid, financial 32 

Alliance Theater, The 18 

Alpha Epsilon Lambda 42 

Alumni auditor 20 



Alimini relations 41 

American Business Review 38 

Applications of psychology 

certificate 108 

Arson investigation certificate .. 108 

Athletics 38 

Attendance 23 

Auditor 20 

Awarding of degrees 25 



B 



Biology course descriptions 

(BI) 122 

Black Graduate Association 42 

Board of governors, administration 
and faculty 173 

Bookstore (see campus store) 

Bureau for Business Research .... 35 

Business administration 46 

Advanced courses 48 

Concentrations 49 

M.B.A 47 

Business administration/ 
industrial engineering dual 
degree program 56 

Business administration/public 
administration dual degree 
program 57 

Business law course descriptions 
(LA) 152 

Business Management 

Certificate 108 

Business policy and strategy 
Concentration in the M.B.A. 
program 49 

Business, school of 16 



Calendar 7 

Campus 17 

Campus Copy, Inc 35 

Campus Security Act 30 

Campus police office 38 



Campus store 35 

Career development 39 

Cellular and molecular biology . 58 
Course descriptions (MB) .... 154 

M.S., degree program 59 

Center for Dispute Resolution 35 

Center for Family Business 37 

Center for Learning Resources .. 36 
Center for the Study of Crime, 
Victims' Rights, Remedies and 

Resources 38 

Certificates 107 

Accounting 107 

Applications of psychology 108 

Arson investigation 108 

Business Management 108 

Civil engineering design 109 

Computer and information 

science 109 

Criminal justice/security 

management 110 

Finance 110 

Fire science/administration and 

technology 110 

Forensic science /advanced 

investigation Ill 

Forensic science/ 

criminalistics Ill 

Forensic science/fire science 111 
Geographical information 

systems Ill 

Health care management 112 

Hospitality and tourism 112 

Human resources 

management 113 

Industrial hygiene 113 

International business 113 

International relations 114 

Legal studies 114 

Logistics 115 

Logistics/advanced 115 

Long-term health care 115 

Marketing 115 

Mental retardation services . 116 

Occupational safety 116 

Public administration 117 

Public management 117 

Public safety management .. 117 



194 

Taxation 118 

Technology management 118 

CFA 79 

CFM 79 

CFP 79 

Charger Bulletin, The 43 

Chariot, The 43 

Chemical engineering 

course descriptions (CM) 128 

Chemistry course descriptions 

(CH) 125 

City management 

Concentration in public 

administration program.. 102 
Civil and environmental 
engineering course 

descriptions (CE) 122 

Civil engineering design 

certificate 109 

College of Arts & Sciences 15 

Commencement 25 

Communication course 

descriptions (CO) 128 

Community psychology 59 

Community-clinical services 

concentration 61 

M.A. degree program 60 

Mental retardation services 

concentration 61 

Program development 

concentration 61 

Community-clinical services 
Concentration in community 

psychology program 61 

Concentration in public 

administration program.. 102 
Comprehensive examinations 

28, 97 

Computer and information 

science 61 

Certificate 108 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 50 

Concentrations 63 

M.S. degree program 62 

Computer engineering option in 

electrical engineering 72 

Computer science course 

descriptions (CS) 129 

Computer services 36 

Cooperative education 34 

Coordinated courses 27 

Copy services (see Campus 

Copy, Inc.) 
Corporate taxation 

specialization 105 

Correctional counseling 

Concentration in criminal justice 

program 65 

Counseling Center 39 

Course descriptions 119 

Crediting examinations 28 

Criminal justice 64 



Concentrations 65 

M.S. degree program 64 

Course descriptions (CJ) 125 

Criminal justice management 
Concentration in criminal 

justice program 65 

Criminal justice/security 

management certificate 110 

Criminalistics 

Concentration in forensic 

science program 83 



D 



Degrees, awarding of 25 

Dental Center 40 

Development office 41 

Disability accommodation 

services 40 

Dissertation 97 

Diversity policy 30 

Doctor of science in management 

systems 97 

Doctoral program course 

descriptions 172 

Dropping/adding a class 28 

Drug-free and smoke-free 

environment 30 

Dual degree programs 

M.B.A./M.P.A 57 

M.B.A. /M.S.I.E 56 



E.M.B.A 77 

Economics course descriptions 

(EC) 133 

Education course descriptions 

(ED) 134 

Education programs 66 

Advanced programs in 
professional education, 
M.S 68 

Applying for state certification 68 

School administration, sixth year 
professional 69 

Teacher certification, M.S 66 

Educational administration 

Concentration in public 

administration program.. 103 
Electrical and computer 

engineering course 

descriptions (EE) 138 

Electrical engineering 70 

Computer engineering option 72 

M.S. degree program 71 

Elm City Review, The 43 

Engineering & Applied Science, 

school of 16 

English course descriptions (E) 133 



English proficiency 20 

Environmental ecology 

Concentration in environmental 

science program 76 

Environmental engineering 73 

Concentrations 74 

M.S. degree program 73 

Environmental geoscience 

Concentration in environmental 

science program 76 

Environmental health and 

management 

Concentration in environmental 

science program 77 

Environmental science 75 

Concentrations 76 

Course descriptions (EN) .... 140 

M.S. degree program 75 

Equal opportunity statement 2 

Essays in Arts and Sciences 38 

Examinations, crediting 28 

Executive M.B.A. course 

descriptions (EXID) 143 

Executive master of business 

administration 77 

External assistance programs .... 34 



Faculty 173 

Fees (nonrefundable) 31 

Finance 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 50 

Finance and financial services ... 78 

Concentrations 79 

M.S. degree program 79 

Finance certificate 110 

Finance course descriptions 

(FI) 144 

Financial aid 32 

Financial assistance 32 

Corporate Financial management 

(CFM option) 79 

Concentration in finance and 
financial services 

program 79 

Financial services management 

(CFA option) 79 

Concentration in finance and 
financial services program 79 

Fire science 80 

Concentrations 81 

Course descriptions (FS) 146 

M.S. degree program 80 

Fire science/administration and 

technology certificate 110 

Food services 39 

Forensic science 81 

Concentrations 83 

Course descriptions (CJ) 125 



Index 195 



M.S. degree program 82 

Forensic science/advanced 

investigation certificate Ill 

Forensic science/criminalistics 

certificate Ill 

Forensic science/fire science 

certificate Ill 

Full-time study 26 

Fully accepted 19 



Geographical information systems 

and applications 

Concentration in environmental 

science program 77 

Geographical information systems 

certificate Ill 

Grade reports 24 

Grading system 24 

Graduate certificates 6, 107 

Graduate degree programs 5 

Graduate housing 39 

Graduate housing costs 32 

Graduate School, general 

information 14 

Graduate Student Council 42 

Graduation petition 26 

Grievance procedure 29 



H 



Health care administration 83 

Concentrations 84 

M.S. degree program 84 

Health care management 

Certificate 112 

Concentration in public 

administration program.. 103 
Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 51 

Health care marketing 

Concentration in health care 

administration program.... 84 
Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 51 

Health examination report ... 18, 40 
Health policy and finance 
Concentration in health care 
administration program.... 84 

Health services 40 

History course descriptions 

(HS) 148 

History of UNH 15 

Honesty and ethics 23 

Hospitality 

Concentration in hospitality 

and tourism program 87 

Hospitality and tourism 85 

Concentrations 87 



Course descriptions (HT) .... 148 

M.S. degree program 87 

Hospitality and tourism 

certificate 112 

Hotel, Restaurant, Tourism & 

Dietetics, school of 17 

Housing 39 

Human nutrition 88 

M.S. degree program 88 

Human resource management in 

health care 

Concentration in health care 
administration program.... 84 
Human resources management 

Certificate 113 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 52 

Humanities course descriptions 

(HU) 149 



I 



Immunizations 18 

In-process students 21 

Incomplete coursework 24 

Independent study 28 

Industrial engineering 88 

Course descriptions (IE) 150 

M.B.A./M.S.I.E. dual degree 
program 56 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 52 

Industrial hygiene 90 

Concentration in occupational 
safety and health 
management 100 

M.S. degree program 90 

Industrial hygiene certificate ... 113 
Industrial-personnel psychology 

Concentration in industrial/ 
organizational psychology 93 
Industrial /organizational 

psychology 91 

Concentrations 93 

M.A. degree program 92 

Industrial relations 94 

M.S. degree program 94 

Insight 41 

Institute of Analytical and 

Environmental Chemistry 37 

International application 

process 20 

International business 

Certificate 113 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 
program 52 

Course descriptions (IB) 150 

International relations 

certificate 114 

International Sports Journal 38 

International student services ... 40 



International students, 

admission 20 

Internships 28 



Lambda Pi Eta 43 

Legal studies certificate 114 

Library 36 

Logistics 

Certificate 115 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 
program 53 

Course descriptions (LG) 153 

Logistics/advanced certificate 115 
Long-term care 

Certificate 115 

Concentration in health care 
administration program.... 84 

Concentration in public 

administration program.. 102 

Certificates 107 



M 



M.A., see master of arts degree 

M.B.A 47 

M.B.A./M.P.A 57 

M.B.A./M.S.I.E 56 

M.P.A 102 

M.S, see master of science degree 

M.S.I.E 89 

M.S.M.E 98 

Main campus 17 

Make-up policy 23 

Managed care 

Concentration in health care 
administration program.... 85 
Management and organization 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 53 

Management course descriptions 

(MG) 157 

Management information systems 

Concentration in computer and 
information science 

program 63 

Management science 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 54 

Management systems (Sc.D.) 95 

Marketing 

Certificate 115 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 
program 54 

Course descriptions (MK) .... 160 

Marvin K. Peterson Library 36 

Master of arts degree programs 

Community psychology 60 



196 

Industrial /organizational 

psychology 91 

Master of business administration 
degree programs 

Executive M.B.A 77 

M.B.A 47 

Master of public administration 
degree 102 

Master of science degree programs 

Accounting 45 

Cellular and molecular 

biology 58 

Computer and information 

science 61 

Criminal justice 64 

Education programs 68 

Electrical engineering 70 

Environmental engineering .. 73 

Environmental science 75 

Finance and financial services 79 

Fire science 80 

Forensic science 82 

Health care administration.... 84 

Hospitality and tourism 87 

Human nutrition 88 

Industrial engineering 88 

Industrial hygiene 90 

Industrial relations 94 

Mechanical engineering 98 

Occupational safety and health 

management 99 

Operations research 101 

Taxation 105 

Master's in business administration 
program 47 

Mathematics course descriptions 
(M) 148 

Master's Tuition 31 

Measles immunization 18 

Measles immunization form 40 

Mechanical engineering 98 

Course descriptions (ME) .... 156 

Medical group management 
Concentration in health care 
administration program.... 85 

Mental retardation services 
Concentration in community 
psychology program 61 

Mental retardation services 

certificate 116 

Minority affairs ( see Mulitcultural 
Affairs and services) 

Molecular biology, cellular and . 58 

Molecular biology course 

descriptions (MB) 154 

Multicultural Affairs and 

Services 41 



New Haven 17 

North Campus 17 

Nutrition course descriptions 

(NU) 161 



O 



N 



NAGPS affiliation 42 



Occupational safety and health 

management 99 

Concentrations 100 

Course descriptions (SH) 170 

M.S. degree program 100 

Occupational safety certificate 116 

Off-campus locations 14 

Operations research 101 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 54 

M.S. degree program 101 

Orchestra New England 18 

Organizational psychology 
Concentration in industrial/ 
organizational psychology 
program 93 



Part-time study 27 

Payment 32 

Personal financial planning (CFP 

option) 79 

Concentration in finance and 
financial services 

program 79 

Personnel and labor relations 

Concentration in public 

administration program.. 104 

Peterson Library 36 

Petition for graduation 26 

Philosophy course descriptions 

(PL) 167 

Physics course descriptions 

(PH) 167 

Political science 

course descriptions (PS) 168 

Prerequisites 28 

Probation, academic 25 

Professional education 68 

Program development 

Concentration in community 

psychology program 61 

Provisionally accepted 19 

PsiChi 43 

Psychology 

Community 59 

Industrial/organizational 91 

Psychology course descriptions 

(P) 162 

Psychology of conflict management 

Concentration in the I/O 

psychology program 93 



Public Administration 

Course descriptions (PA) 165 

M.B.A. /M.PA. dual degree 

program 57 

Public administration 102 

Concentrations 102 

Public administration certificate 117 
Public management certificate 117 
Public relations 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 55 

Public Safety and Professional 

Studies, School of 17 

Public safety management 

certificate 117 

Public taxation specialization .. 106 



Q 



QPR 25 

Quahty point ratio 25 

Quantitative analysis 

course descriptions (QA) 169 



R 



Radio station 43 

Refund policy for federal loans . 34 

Refunds 32 

Registration 21 

Repetition of work 25 

Research projects 28 

Residency requirements 26 

Residential life (see graduate 

Housing) 

Rubella immunization 41 



Sc.D., management systems 96 

Sc.D. Tuition and fees 31 

School administration 69 

Security management 

Concentration in criminal justice 

program 65 

Services for students with 

disabilities 40 

Sigma Beta Delta 43 

Sixth year professional diploma, 

school administration 70 

Smoke-free environment 30 

Sociology course descriptions 

(SO) 171 

South campus 17 

Special (nonmatriculated) 19 

Sports Management 

Concentration in M.B.A. 

program 55 



Index 197 



Standards, academic 24 

Store, campus 35 

Student and academic services .. 35 

Student organizations 42 

Student publications 43 

Student Right-to-Know and 

Campus Security Act 30 

Systems software 

Concentration in computer and 

information science 

program 62 



Taxation 104 

Certificate 118 

M.S. degree program 105 

Specializations 105 

Teacher certification 66 

Technology 

Concentration in fire science 

program 81 

Technology management 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 55 

Technology management 

certificate 118 

Telecommunication management 

certificate 118 

Test of English as a Foreign 

Language 20 

Thesis 29 

Time limit for completion of 

degree 26 

Title IX 2 

TOEFL 20 

Tourism 

Concentration in hospitality 

and tourism program 87 

Transfer credit 27 

Tuition, fees and financial aid ... 32 



U 



UNH Foundation 37 

University of New Haven 

Press/Academic Publications 39 
University, the 13 



V 



Veteran's affairs 41 



W 



Waiver of courses 27 

Withdrawal 32 

WNHU radio 43 



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University of New Haven 

Graduate School 
300 Orange Avenue 
West Haven, CT 06516 



SECOND CLASS 
POSTAGE 

PAID 

NEW HAVEN, CT 



CALL TOLL FREE 

1.800. DIAL UNH 

ADMISSIONS OFFICE: 

Graduate: 203. 932. 7135 
Email; gradinfo@chargernewhaven.edu 
FINANCIAL AID OFFICE: 

203.932.7314 

INTERNET: 

http://www.newhaven.edu